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Old 08-04-2017, 05:27 PM   #1
Stacy
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Default Hello from Idaho

I attended a course by Barrett Dorko in Twin Falls, ID over ten years ago and what he taught has never left me. I took his information home and put it into my own life and into the pain clinic. I worked in the pain clinic for maybe a year after his course. I changed to pediatric PT after that and again what he taught never left me. But I initially did not know how to apply it to children and I wanted to apply it to children. I wanted to figure out why developmentally delayed children did not generate basic stability, mobility, and strength of movement. So I moved more into birth to three years-old population to study and see if I could find where it originates and if I could tap into it. Ten years later, I am bursting with connections and insight, that really hit me this past December. I wanted to catch up with Barrett and see where his thoughts are now. I have been out of touch with Barrett's writings for many years. I appreciate his response to my recent email and guidance to SomaSimple. As I put together my thoughts and connections I would love to share them and get feedback. I just spent some time reading on SomaSimple and now say Hello.

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Old 08-04-2017, 05:35 PM   #2
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Hello Stacy. I appreciate your writing here.

Any experiences you care to write about? Are any of the therapists you've worked with familiar with anything said here?

If "shouting at clouds" is a thing, there seems to be a lot of that here. A note like yours is appreciated.
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Old 08-04-2017, 06:31 PM   #3
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I do not directly work with any physical therapists. I go into homes and help mom's and dad's develop strategies for progressing babies and toddlers through developmental milestones. What drives me is an intense love of movement. I work from the premise, what does it take to help the developmentally delayed child put together the stability, mobility, strength of movement. I incorporate all aspects of development and early learning. What I do is accepted as gross motor development by the other disciplines I coordinate with on a transdisciplinary team. I would say my deeper connection to movement is what I have been logging in my head through experience. There is a lot in there. Where do I start. I started by re-connecting with you...I will also be meeting in May with the pain clinic doctor I worked with over ten years ago. We spoke on the phone and plan to meet.

Well, I found my place in helping infants through age three years to develop our basic, original movements. I have observed the subtle nuances of Movement progression and have a pretty good idea of how and why to intervene by simple touch to insist that the child does not keep going down the path of Movement that will hinder putting together what infancy-toddler movements are there to do.
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Old 08-04-2017, 07:12 PM   #4
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Stacy,

You do remember that I call it Simple Contact, don't you? I think that all of our ways of communicating with others is potentially effective. You probably already know that.

Anyway, I'm glad you found your niche and look forward to hearing how you find the "pain" doctor.
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:06 AM   #5
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Hello Stacy,

I am a PT long retired, but went OS to attend Barret's classes in 2005

I have used Simple Contact many times since, now mainly on myself (no more patients!) I think you made a good choice to go into paediatrics before the patient's brain has set too far into concrete; best wishes for the future.

Regards,

Nari --- a member of SS for quite a long time.
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Old 09-04-2017, 03:46 PM   #6
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Welcome, Stacy.

Much of what Barrett teaches and writes about with respect to his method and its application to patients has to do with the subtle influences of the culture on how we move in way that allows us to express our authentic selves. I'd be interested to hear from your perspective how you might see this influence in your very young patients.

I spent 2 years in West Africa, which was several years before I became a PT. In retrospect, however, persistent pain problems were not part of my experience in that culture. People didn't complain of aches and pains, which isn't to say they didn't experience injuries. That happened quite often due to the rigorous and often hazardous demands of daily agrarian life. The children that survived infancy and very early childhood (a significantly smaller number than we see in the West), struck me with an ability for graceful and agile movement. And the love for dance to those infectious West African rhythms was universal. I wonder now if this seemingly inherent ability to move well had more to do with cultural influences or the fact that children with neuromuscular impairments were less likely to survive infancy. I suspect both factors are relevant. I'd be interested in your thoughts on this given your experience and interest in Barrett's work.

You may be interested in the link to an upcoming international conference on pediatric pain that was linked to by a longtime member of SomaSimple in this thread.
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Old 09-04-2017, 04:23 PM   #7
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John,

I was hoping that someone would point Stacy to Mike's thread. My work has been about a complaint of pain and how the culture often contributes to that. I was raised, and, again, reside in Northeast Ohio, which explains a lot about me. You, however, traveled to Africa. You lived there too. Despite being raised in St Louis, I think of you as part African.

That's a compliment, by the way.

My efforts to start some discussion about how powerful things are hasn't generated anything to speak of. I notice that I'm speaking of cultural things mainly, and those are remarkably powerful. I probably shouldn't put too fine a point on it.

We all aren't lucky enough to be raised in Northeast Ohio.
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Old 09-04-2017, 05:04 PM   #8
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Barrett,
I'm intrigued by the possibility that cultural impositions on instinctive movement begin very early in Western cultures. I recall a certain teacher when I was in the second grade issuing frequent warnings to "sit still". I dreaded entering that classroom and recall staring at the clock waiting for the merciful release from bondage provided by recess. Today, I'd probably be diagnosed with "hyperactivity disorder".

It seems plausible that acculturation to the suppression of ideomotor activity occurs along a continuum that can reach a point capable of producing mechanical deformation sufficient, although not necessary, to produce a complaint of pain.

I think most would agree that it's important for children to move not only frequently but with a certain amount of abandon. And by that I mean allowing their thoughts to wander in such a way that promotes creativity and exploration of the self and environment. I would think this is critical in developing one's authentic self.
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Old 09-04-2017, 07:08 PM   #9
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John,

Well said. I tend to be more of a storyteller, not that it ever made much of a difference.

People always wanted references. I provided them but nobody (well, almost nobody) read them.

Oh yes, story tellers don't make money. Well, hardly ever.
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Old 09-04-2017, 07:47 PM   #10
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Default Subtle judgements of Movement on children

John,

I remember first starting in the pediatric clinic and getting a small patient load of children handed over to me from other PTs, keep in mind these were the children that they chose to turn over to me, but I also started new children into therapy as well and the same observation applies. I said to myself where is the movement, where is the fluidity, strength, any athletic ability at all, and any fundamental ability? I did not just say this to myself. It showed on my face, my sighs, my body communication. I felt horrible for portraying this. It would of course not just be me throughout their day doing this. I loosened up and tried to make things fun and made efforts to be the best supporter of how awesome my kiddos were and a cheerleader and coach for the cool movements they could create. Then I worked my way into a position to work with the infant to toddler population so that I could, as I said before, try to find the basic structural framework that seemed missing. I am less frustrated now. I found how to really help by starting younger and figuring so much out! My next move is to bring this information that is processing in my head back to the older kiddos. That is why I am reaching out, to see where I am in the bigger picture neuroscience, study of Movement, neural plasticity, etc and I respect Barrett's perspective and he lead me to your insights.

Your insights are great and make me smile. I am happy to re-connect with Barrett in this way.
I had kind of forgotten Barrett's words on social or cultural connections to Movement. My next age group is shown (in the African version)... YouTube Federacao Mundial de Capoeira's video, African kids dancing or search Masada Kids Africana. I would think there is a better way to link that video, but no known to me.

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Old 09-04-2017, 11:52 PM   #11
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John,

I remember first starting in the pediatric clinic and getting a small patient load of children handed over to me from other PTs, keep in mind these were the children that they chose to turn over to me, but I also started new children into therapy as well and the same observation applies. I said to myself where is the movement, where is the fluidity, strength, any athletic ability at all, and any fundamental ability? I did not just say this to myself. It showed on my face, my sighs, my body communication. I felt horrible for portraying this. It would of course not just be me throughout their day doing this. I loosened up and tried to make things fun and made efforts to be the best supporter of how awesome my kiddos were and a cheerleader and coach for the cool movements they could create. Then I worked my way into a position to work with the infant to toddler population so that I could, as I said before, try to find the basic structural framework that seemed missing. I am less frustrated now. I found how to really help by starting younger and figuring so much out! My next move is to bring this information that is processing in my head back to The children three years and older. That is why I am reaching out.

Your insights about Africa are great and make me smile. I am happy to re-connect with Barrett in this way. I apprecite the reminder of Barrett's words on social or cultural connections to Movement. I also now remember the term simple contact.

Thanks,
Stacy

Last edited by Stacy; 09-04-2017 at 11:55 PM.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:20 PM   #12
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A belated warm welcome, Stacy. I already like your contributions to Soma; we need more contributing members who0 work with the youngest people!
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Old 21-04-2017, 04:19 PM   #13
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Hello Barrett and the welcome crew,

In catching up with you, after all these years, I am remembering your words and thoughts. I see that I am at the right place for some guidance and input, dialog. I am trying to put together my thoughts, as I have mentioned. I will be meeting the doctor I worked with in the pain clinic soon and need to practice what it is I am trying to say, you had expressed an interest in this encounter. By the way the doctor is retired and is way into horses now. She and I are going to catch up as well. I think I left out in my introduction that I am an artist. I have been dedicated to developing my fine art of watercolor, print making and drawing for the past 8 years. I would like to run some things by you, if I may? Here is my first, kind of statement, for now I am calling it ART of Movement.

ART of Movement is the coming together of my pediatric knowledge, pain management knowledge, and my art:

Develop the connection between primal movements, primitive reflex integration, myofascial lines, vestibular and ocular input, stability with dynamic strength and mobility, ideomotion/subconscious motion, self mobilization of myofascia, visual imagery, recognition of compensatory movement patterns and use art to illlustrate, tell a story, and see movement.

If the connection to ideomotion or subconscious movement is not immediately evident, I feel I can bring that out as I practice explaining what I have learned. Your insight would be appreciated.

Stacy
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