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Old 22-03-2017, 12:46 PM   #51
TonyG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by proud View Post

On a blog someone asked him about chronic back pain and this is his response:


"sympathize, because I have had similar back pain over the past 20 years. The thing that has made the most difference for me is that about 4 years ago I began diligently stretching my hamstrings every time I train. I have used back extensions, reverse hypers, and deadlifts all successfully to rehab this problem, but since I have been stretching my hamstrings I can get my back in the correct position to lift with much greater reliability, and have had FAR less trouble than I used to have with my back. Hip flexors are NOT the trouble -- if your hamstrings are tight you cannot get into proper lumbar extension. Give it a try, and you'll know in a couple of weeks. "


Uh...
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This bloke is describing his experience re: LBP.
Which part/s perturb you the most?

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Old 22-03-2017, 02:23 PM   #52
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For me there are two big hiccups in that statement.

Tight hamstrings limiting lumbar extension? even the most biomechanically oriented person should know that if hamstrings are THAT tight that the spine can't flex - they.can. not. walk.

Second, he had already "successfully" rehabbed the problem.....but still needed those hammies stretched to have "FAR less trouble". I wonder what successful means to him.
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Old 22-03-2017, 06:51 PM   #53
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His "HS tightness" became his reassuring, pat on the back, positive feedback loop that his brain could check in on and get reassured his exercise routine would be safe and successful. For some its a foam roll, some a manip, some needling.......add it to the list.

Just my take on it from a far.
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Old 22-03-2017, 07:39 PM   #54
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Quote:
Tight hamstrings limiting lumbar extension? even the most biomechanically oriented person should know that if hamstrings are THAT tight that the spine can't flex - they.can. not. walk.
Bas,
I think he meant he was not able to maintain an adequate neutral lumbar spinal position while performing deadlifts. Maybe he thought his HS were so tight that he was starting back extensions and reverse hypers in an excessively flexed position? I don't know- that doesn't make much sense. Like you said, if your HS were that tight, you wouldn't be able to walk.
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Old Yesterday, 04:41 AM   #55
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In Rippetoe’s statement, he ignores the CNS and instead puts forward a biomechanical model as the catalyst for his improvement.

Who’s to say that his actions/behaviour (hammy stretching) did not create some kind of safe platform for him to perform; even though he probably doesn’t see it that way? His experience is unique to him, after all.

FWIW I don’t prescribe conventional stretching because I see it as the CNS being bullied by its host. Unless it’s a spontaneous movement, in which case I say go with it.

John, I imagine Rippetoe is reffering to passive insufficiency in straight leg dead lifts.

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Old Yesterday, 11:37 AM   #56
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If you listen or work with powerlifters or those trying to achieve absolute strength, many will talk about pain. While their self management or suggestions for rehab and treatment may not pass muster, they typically take an active, self efficacious approach. For that I have to give them credit. Its better than many in the "rehab" profession.

I also like that Rip calls out the outpatient rehab setting. To me, he does have a point.
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