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Old 25-01-2007, 09:07 PM   #1
Diane
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Default Six ways to cope with stress

Article.
Excerpt:
Quote:
Take a deep breath. Now exhale slowly. You're probably not aware of it, but your heart has just slowed down a bit. Not to worry; it will speed up again when you inhale. This regular-irregular beat is a sign of a healthy interaction between heart and head. Each time you exhale, your brain sends a signal down the vagus nerve to slow the cardiac muscle. With each inhale, the signal gets weaker and your heart revs up. Inhale, beat faster. Exhale, beat slower. It's an ancient rhythm that helps your heart last a lifetime. And it leads to lesson No. 1 in how to manage stress and avoid burnout.
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"Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

“Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

“If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

"In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

"Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire
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Old 21-11-2009, 12:21 PM   #2
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Hello
Following link is the best trips to cope of stress
1. Try to adapt - strive to get away from much of what produces stress. Use waiting at the office or anywhere to read, study or write letters. But, more importantly, by adapting in this way you gain confidence that you are in control of your lives.
2. Talk out stress - don't keep all your worries and stress bottled up inside. Discuss your worries with a sympathetic friend whom you respect and who may be able to help or advise. You naturally don't want to be a complainer or whiner about troubles real or imagined. But you do not become that by confiding in a trusted friend.
3. Exercise will help you - your body often manifests the "fight or flight" response to stress; it is prepared for strenuous effort. Regular physical exercise will help you to use up the extra sugars and fats in your blood caused by stress, thus counteracting the biochemical effects of stress and restoring your body's healthy balance. So, you need to do more exercise, as swimming, hiking or playing tennis.
4. Balance work and play - work is not an evil plague. It is physically and mentally good for you to be active and productive, such as in earning a living and the means to enjoy play.Even when you are working, take a few moments regularly to "play" by stretching. That can relieve the muscles of your face, neck, shoulders and back, lessening any buildup of stress.
5. Get enough sleep - it is vital to get enough rest and sleep since this is vital to a good physical well being. Sleep lets your body repair itself, restoring the balanced biochemical state.
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Old 22-11-2009, 01:08 PM   #3
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Diane:
It is a bit challenge for me as a junior member whose mother tongue is not english to whrite a reply in english threads in SS but I assume it. I come here on the SS"arena" to thank you for the trip to cope with stress.
For me and for our patients, it ist more a "way of healing" the nervous sistem in general.
I tried yesterday the "ancient rythm". It functions. I find amazing the dialogue brain heart. Really... I exaled and I had the "proprioception" of the nerve vagus (?) conveying the sinal to the heart. I found very funny this "ping pong" head heart. I mean I had the "propriocetion" of this, IMHO.
Before we pass those information to our patients, it is wise to try it "in" ourselves.
Diane, you can see my presentation in the francophone forum ( the so called "patatas fritas" thread). Maybe one day we would be able to exchange "ey-deas" in a portuguese forum here in SS considering your spanish competences and the similarities between both langues.
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Old 22-11-2009, 01:09 PM   #4
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Diane:
A big not a bit challenge.
Benjamim
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Old 22-11-2009, 02:25 PM   #5
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Hi Benjamin,

Muchas gracias por escribir en Inglés.
My French is terrible and Español solamente un pocito mejor - tengo casi 60 años - probablement no va llegar mejor.

Anyway, yes, I also thought the news story on tips for controlling stress was useful.
The breathing hypothesis makes sense - I was able to control my own heart variability on a direct feedback test, once, by simply (and slowly!) deep breathing for about 10 minutes straight - heart rate variability stayed way up in the "healthy" zone on the graph, in a nice smooth sinusoidal line, rather than a jagged line plunging downward into 'danger' zones.

A curious side effect from all that deliberate deep breathing was that I had a vivid sensory experience that my nose was just one large phantom nostril, and that the nostril was situated at the bridge of the nose. It went back to normal straight after. Probably if I practiced every day, the virtual nostril would adapt or something.
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"Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

“Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

“If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

"In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

"Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire
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Old 22-11-2009, 09:32 PM   #6
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I believe that the decreased HR with exhalation is due to negative intra-thoracic pressure which increases blood return in the vena cava and hence assists more efficient filling of the heart.

Vice versa for the increase with breathing in.

Not trying to nit-pick though I'm a huge avocate of breathing "low and slow".
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Old 09-07-2011, 07:13 AM   #7
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Its a good information. I think it will help me a lot. Thanks for this useful post.




[URL="http://www.discoverholistichealth.org/"]holistic health
[URL="http://www.discoverholistichealth.org/"]holistic digestion
[URL="http://www.discoverholistichealth.org/"]holistic heart health

Last edited by Diane; 09-07-2011 at 07:36 AM. Reason: links deactivated.
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Old 09-07-2011, 01:52 PM   #8
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Default NO2 ways about it.

Thanks for this Diane.

I am presently treating three clients going through depression. All three have mentioned how much they worry about their heartbeat ''going crazy'' on them.

I have pointed them to your splendid, Alpha dog, Humanantigravity blog post. (one day, I'll learn to link properly, one day.) They get it, They love it. They feel less isolated, empowered (cheesy word , but hey). They feel like they are making a difference in getting themselves out of this scary and painful situation.

And breathing? Doesn't cost a dime.
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Old 09-07-2011, 02:01 PM   #9
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Carol Lynn,

Clever title to the post.

Reading the right stuff can certainly help and I appreciate all you have on the list.

It occurs to me that though breathing is free, teaching people how best to do it can be legitimately charged for. And that's a good thing.
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Old 09-07-2011, 02:14 PM   #10
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Hi Caro, wish I knew which post you meant. Anyway, glad you were able to help your patients find whatever it was they needed to read to help themselves learn how to help themselves.
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"Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

“Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

“If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

"In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

"Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire
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Old 09-07-2011, 05:23 PM   #11
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Hi Diane,

The gem to which I am referring :

http://humanantigravitysuit.blogspot...with+a+patient

Hi Barrett,

Quote:
It occurs to me that though breathing is free, teaching people how best to do it can be legitimately charged for. And that's a good thing.
Very good point indeed.
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Old 09-07-2011, 05:25 PM   #12
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Ah. Thank you Caro.
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Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
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"Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

“Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

“If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

"In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

"Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire
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Old 09-07-2011, 05:26 PM   #13
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Old 10-05-2017, 10:16 AM   #14
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Thanks for this useful information.
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Old 10-05-2017, 03:34 PM   #15
Diane
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Hi marnathall,
Please start a thread in the welcome forum and introduce yourself.
Thanks.
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www.dermoneuromodulation.com
SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
Neurotonics PT Teamblog
Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
@PainPhysiosCan
WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
@WCPTPTPN
Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

@dfjpt
SomaSimple on Facebook
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"Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

“Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

“If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

"In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

"Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire
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