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Old 18-04-2017, 01:40 PM   #1
Barrett Dorko
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Default Yes, I'm still here

I haven't written as much as I used to. My editing is prolific. That probably tells you something.

I don't talk much and my speech is rehearsed. I walk with care but haven't fallen recently. I see from looking at old posts that I had anticipated this, but understand that prediction is problematic. To me, that's why weather forecasters have gotten better looking. I've seen the way people look grow and become increasingly powerful and absurd as my own life has progressed. The confusion that has followed this trend has simply overwhelmed me. I see it with more clarity now but I'm pretty silent about that.

I may have mentioned that.

I still watch and listen to stuff. I seem addicted to the screen and my iPod, which is a little irritating to those wishing to actually speak to me.

I've been watching a lot of the tributes to House recently, and find them fascinating. Perhaps it is his curmudgeonly nature that attracts me, his lack of "salesmanship" and his overall way of being that compels me. I haven't had the pain he endured, but living is enough.

Interestingly, I've delved (via video) into the actor (Hugh Laurie) the past few weeks. He said in an interview that "some" things were done well on the show over its many seasons. It was the end result of a team effort.

Like the treatment of painful complaint it takes a team. Are you the member of a team?
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Old 18-04-2017, 09:41 PM   #2
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I always enjoyed doing something that might be done alone; harmonica, tennis (well, against a wall) and drumming. House was pretty much alone, unless he wasn't. He thought alone and I know what that's like.

When asked (well, told) to join a team in order to treat painful complaint I found it difficult to find teammates that had some of the ideas and defensible methods I brought with me.

Has anybody found a similar problem?
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Old 18-04-2017, 10:06 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
I always enjoyed doing something that might be done alone; harmonica, tennis (well, against a wall) and drumming. House was pretty much alone, unless he wasn't. He thought alone and I know what that's like.

When asked (well, told) to join a team in order to treat painful complaint I found it difficult to find teammates that had some of the ideas and defensible methods I brought with me.

Has anybody found a similar problem?
My new favorite (and it seems to be catching hold) is this notion that "you can't talk pain away"

I heard this on a recent dry needling course I took and the instructor was quoting Gwendylyn Jull apparently. The instructor was practically giddy when she quoted it...in a sort of "take that you dumb pain folks...you don't know the power of dry needling"

Her inability to see the silliness of the quote astounded me.

This type of statement I am sure is a strategic backlash against science in an effort to "shame" those who dare suggest all the meaty, patho-anatomical "systems" are probably fun...but quite meaningless when it comes to actually treating things.

It also illuminates a profound lack of knowledge. All wrapped up in one silly comment.

Seriously now...raise your hand anyone here who thinks you can "talk pain away" or ever suggested such a thing?

Yet this is the new backhanded comment that I now hear from folks who have not invested the time to understand things better.

Last edited by proud; 18-04-2017 at 10:11 PM.
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Old 18-04-2017, 11:25 PM   #4
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(carefully raising a hand) I think that knowledge garnered from a conversation CAN/MAY in very few cases, be sufficient to "make it go away".
Have seen it happen once myself. In 34 years, not a good stat.....

So, "just talking pain away" is not very high on my go-to strategies.....
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Old 19-04-2017, 12:55 AM   #5
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proud,

What if she'd said, "Stick it with a needle!"?

Bas,

Keep your hand down and try not to roll your eyes. You're just asking to get punched.
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Old 19-04-2017, 01:44 AM   #6
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Bas,
I have one lone success as well. Still vividly remember it. A 54 yo female fell 2 yes ago and sustained an L1 compression fracture, nondisplaced. She was told by primary care not to bend over or she may become paralyzed, and sent her home with pain pills. She was sent to me with chronic back pain, she listed back fracture as her primary complaint. In my discussion I asked if she recently fractured, she said nope. She could only flex to her knees and would have pain. We talked and I assured her she was completely healed, was at no risk of paralysis with flexion. She was amazed and asked permission to touch her toes, I smiled and said go for it. She did, had no pain, I never saw her again!
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Old 19-04-2017, 03:56 AM   #7
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Quite some years ago I was working in our Pain Clinic; a woman in her thirties came into the room. She had quite limited spinal flexion and extension with pain. The XRs were unremarkable -the pain was getting slowly worse.

After pain education and telling her the XRs were OK according to the doc, she sat up and listened. I asked her what she wanted most to do and her reply was looking after her garden - she reported pain doing this activity. So I said OK, continue what you wish to do and tell yourself that your brain needs movement - ASAP.

She smiled, not convinced and came back three days later beaming like a kid at a party.

She had told herself that the pain cannot harm her and got on with her garden. I heard later that she was painfree after several days once her brain realised a "danger" signal was over the top.

If only more patients were like her....but we all know they are not.

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Old 19-04-2017, 10:01 PM   #8
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I was listening to a Peter O'Sullivan talk online recently. He commented that we can't just say, we have to do (or something along those lines). By doing, he means showing the patient that they are capable of thoughtless, fearless movement. As we all know, setting the stage for all of this comes with good quality education and communication skills. As Barrett and many others have eluded to, context is crucial.

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Old 19-04-2017, 10:07 PM   #9
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Aaron,

Context costs.

Shouldn't forget that.

O'Sullivan is right, but he wouldn't last long as a contract guy in Ohio.

He'd grow silent, and then he'd become a curmudgeon.

Imagine that.
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Old 19-04-2017, 10:17 PM   #10
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Barrett,

Agreed.

I find my schedule not as busy as it was a few years ago...on the plus side, I actually enjoy work more now and am not killing my body trying to "perform" all the wonderful manual therapy tricks.

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Old 20-04-2017, 06:34 PM   #11
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I'm reading a book entitled Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-In

A couple of insights Brett Bartholomew presents seem to be good advice for therapists as well as coaches:

"Three universals of authenticity, regardless of one's unique coaching style, are consistency, clarity, and level of directness when dealing with athletes."

"Let sincerity and your passion for helping others be your most valued credentials."
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Old 20-04-2017, 09:11 PM   #12
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Thanks Ken,

At 42 years in the business, you're one of my contemporaries.

I recommended that book a month ago in this blog.

You probably already knew that.
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Old 21-04-2017, 05:08 AM   #13
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Hi Barrett!

Over the years, just about every book you have recommended I end up buying--even those Steinmeyer magic books. I read them on my I Pad. As I approach 66 in a month, I love the screen lamination, and that I can enlarge the font size. It's also great for highlighting passages, looking up terms, making notations, and reading in the dark when I get up to pee and can't get back to sleep.

I like that you refer to me as a contemporary. It sounds better than geezer, a term which use a lot. I will bet that you are also a Kindler, and I know you also like audio books.
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Old 21-04-2017, 12:08 PM   #14
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Ken,

I'll be 66 this year as well. I prefer "curmudgeon" rather than "geezer" because the former implies thoughtfulness and a certain behavior. It has an extra syllable as well. No doubt, I'm a cranky conversationalist. That's a behavior you've possibly avoided, and that is why you're the coach you are.

Maybe you are a geezer.
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Old 21-04-2017, 05:24 PM   #15
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HaHa!

Part of my coaching longevity has something to do with kids still finding me entertaining, and my enjoyment is seeing that they are having fun. They like getting a nickname, and laugh when I call them "mugs" or "chuckle heads." And they look for standard routines that older brothers tell younger brothers to expect from me at some point during the season. It's sometimes hard to explain to others just how this dynamic works, but I think it comes down to giving kids one small thing to look forward to every day, and their believing that my goal is to do all I can to help them feel good about themselves. When they come to accept that, they are able to laugh at stuff that others might not find all that humorous.

For example, lots of coaches like to shake hands with their athletes after practice. At least once a year, after shaking hands with a younger runner, I'll turn to the group and say: "Hey guys, just so you know, I had to go to the bathroom, and the sinks aren't working and there's no soap in the dispensers."

My version of toilet humor...

And if I forget to do this once each season, the older guys always remind me about it.

As you like to say, "I'm a very lucky man."
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Old 21-04-2017, 08:33 PM   #16
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Physical therapy........
Quote:
it comes down to giving kids one small thing to look forward to every day, and their believing that my goal is to do all I can to help them feel good about themselves. When they come to accept that
......their pain improves and they are able to return to what they miss doing!
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Old 22-04-2017, 05:46 AM   #17
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Hi Josh!

You know, I've never thought it about it that way, but I believe you're right!
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