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  • Bouquet thread: "Why I like SomaSimple"

    Here is a thread for people, members, readers to put a bouquet, if they want to.

    Somasimple gets its share of knocks, mostly by those who can't quite see what it's here for. It's not "popular". People don't come here in droves to flatter themselves and receive beflatterment.

    We don't, in fact, have much of anything positive to say about much that's out there. We don't support most of it. Not very many end up in our Hall of Fame.

    We tend to deconstruct everything - most things look wonky and don't add up. We love to look behind the paint and drywall to see what the joists are really like; quite often, we see there aren't any joists to be found.

    How do most Big Ideas in the human primate social grooming world move? Mostly on fumes and momentum, that's how. So, we like to slow something down, take it apart, see if there is anything worth salvaging, and if not, say so and then move on.

    We don't have many fans as a result.

    However, every once in awhile, something, some little twist, some little lightbulb comes on, some little idea wiggles its way up out of someone's subterranean depth of thought, and surfaces, and their world changes by a bit. Or even by a lot. Then SomaSimple is mentioned in the credits, alongside many others. And SomaSimple can feel proud that it exists. :thumbs_up

    Today, I read a blogpost by Byron, a member here, that really made my day. It's about his roofing adventure. I'm sure he must have mentioned this blogpost somewhere here, but I didn't actually see or read it until I saw it today reposted by Caro, on Facebook. Here is a link:

    It's a great post, all about Byron's huge task, how he sized it up, broke it down, logged progress on it, watched his body adapt, tracked his feelings and stress levels, dealt with inevitable delays and setbacks, finally gotterdone and digested the process, then wrote about it to encourage others. He gives a bouquet to SomaSimple and to many quality blogs on the internet written by friends and acquaintances in this community, and on facebook, who have good information to share and and no gimmicks for sale.

    Thanks for your post Byron. I have madly reposted it all over the place, and want it to have a spot here in the first post of what may one day be a longer thread of bouquet posts all strung together.

    Well-done! You let pain science seep into the nooks and crannies of your brain, and let the information change the relationship you have with your own physicality. Very well done. :clap2:
    I look forward to seeing what you do for an encore!
    :angel::thumbs_up
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

  • #2
    Folks at SS always get called "negative" and "critical". But shit, someone has to be. Please don't change.
    Dave

    Comment


    • #3
      Here is a post from earlier today by Ken:

      I'd like to share with you my position as an "ousider" to the Somasimple culture who came here and never left.

      First, a little background:

      All thirty eight years of my coaching career have involved trying to assess the kind of strength protocol that would be most effective for my high school athletes considering variables such as 1) the training age of my athletes 2) their previous running experiences and 3) the length of time I have available to “periodize” a protocol that could increase their strength within the very narrow training and racing window of opportunity I have each spring.

      I have tried every protocol that has been recommended or used by others over the years, with my own core of athletes as test subjects.

      The problem I encounter in making any assessments of these protocols is that the majority of these require their own “conversion” blocks or periodization schemes. Valid assessments are further complicated by the fact that many of these protocols also require ancillary or supplementary lifts that must be employed in conjunction with the primary protocol.

      So…if I have a “positive” outcome—athletes doing the same things they’ve done previously with the exception of the “new” strength protocol--was it the primary lifts themselves,or the “holistic” effects of ALL the lifts--even the ancillary ones—combining to produce the favorable outcome?

      And what if (and in my situation this has happened far more frequently) there are no statistically significant outcomes from the protocol being tested? The answer I get from proponents of the training system is that 1) my periodization plan was too short to experience gains or 2) I didn’t do the required ancillary lifts appropriately to produce the desired effect.

      And I think you know where this is headed…

      When I offer these insights/concerns, the answer I get is: “Well, it works for me. My athletes are stronger and faster.”

      Likewise, I’m sure a considerable number of therapists wouldn’t “cudgel their brains” over why certain protocols appear to work, but this is the climate of SomaSimple And this climate fits my approach.

      Twelve years ago I headed to Harvard’s Concord Field Station to discuss speed training with one of the world’s leading authorities on human locomotion. I wanted to understand the implications of his research on ground support forces in running, but I also wanted to give him my perspective on the mechanical means by which I believed athletes achieve faster top speeds. He listended to my approach, and then referred to what I was telling him as “pure gibberish.”

      After that experience, I could have gotten on a plane and headed back to Illinois. But I didn’t. Instead, I took the position of what if I had been wrong. That position has made all the difference for me. It’s means I’ve spent the past twelve years trying to “get right” what I screwed up in the first twenty-six.”

      In the p;rocess, that same researcher wrote the endorsement for my book. In his review, he noted the following: “While many of his peers found comfort and assurance in slickly packaged training products, Olympic testimonials and the performance gurus of the day, Ken has never stopped asking hard questions or striving for more effective techniques.”

      That insight made me feel really good-- despite having been dead wrong on key issues for the better part of my career.

      Perhaps only one thing has made me feel better as a coach. Every year at the end of the season I ask my athletes to review my performance. Of course, we all like to hear glowing reviews highlighting our expertise, motivational skills, and commitment. But one simple comment I received a few years back is the one I find most meaningful:

      “He doesn’t make stuff up.”

      There’s being dead wrong and SomaSimple “dead.”
      I prefer the latter.
      Even though it requires having to admit the former.

      I’m sure many of the Somasimplers here would change their approaches tomorrow if duplicatable, research based evidence suggested where they are currently focused was all wrong.

      Many already have as a result of their experiences here.

      So how does the newbie "survive" the SomaSimple culture?

      Begin with the positon taken in good research. Come here with the intention of having an initial hypothesis refuted.

      Being certain about our postion is the wrong kind of dead.

      Not thinking it matters--or that postive outcomes should suffice--is the worst kind of dead.
      Diane
      www.dermoneuromodulation.com
      SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
      HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
      Neurotonics PT Teamblog
      Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
      Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
      @PainPhysiosCan
      WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
      @WCPTPTPN
      Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

      @dfjpt
      SomaSimple on Facebook
      @somasimple

      "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

      “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

      “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

      "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

      "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you so much Diane!

        I can't express how much I have enjoyed and learned here at Soma. I am, as the say, a raving fan. I would post Soma every single FB post if I thought people wouldn't start blocking me.

        I have enjoyed so many contributions from those on this site and I feel exactly the way Ken does above. I am glad to be a "dead man".

        I also learn so much about human psychology when I read the new, insulted posters who don't last more than a few posts.

        The other day Paul Ingraham emailed me to ask if I spent much time here. I said, like every day! And he said well it must be you this person is talking about. They had told Paul that they were so sick of Byron and his Soma Acolytes taking over all of Paul's FB posts. Paul said he had had nothing but great interactions with the good people here.

        If I had juice in my mouth it would have hit the screen when I read that. I had to look up Acolytes. Juice would have hit the screen again when I read that.

        Someday I hope I understand people like this. For now I will just have to assume they are from another planet.

        Acolytes, really


        Byron
        Last edited by byronselorme; 02-12-2012, 09:19 PM. Reason: Grammar
        Byron Selorme -SomaSimpleton and Science Based Yoga Educator
        Shavasana Yoga Center

        "The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool" Richard Feynman

        Comment


        • #5
          I also learn so much about human psychology when I read the new, insulted posters who don't last more than a few posts.
          So do I, Byron, but it still doesn't add up to a clearer picture for me. My instant reaction is to think "Grow up" but that doesn't help at all.
          For now I will just have to assume they are from another planet.
          Or another world of their own on this one?

          Nari

          Comment


          • #6
            This is why I alluded earlier to Romper Room and "a parallel universe."

            Glad that didn't get by everybody.
            Barrett L. Dorko

            Comment


            • #7
              A few years ago I decided to become an osteopath. All that stuff about moving bones and fascia, profound knowledge of anatomy and some deep, almost magical palpation skill, fascinated me. Learning all this mysterious stuff about the human creature!

              I found one school and decided to do a bit of research on the web to find out more about the teacher. My search lead me here on SS. Nothing nice was said about the man.
              I read on.
              SS quite literally shocked me but I couldn't steer my eyes away from it. I took a few breaks, just to catch my breath and ultimately, come back to dive deeper.

              I had no idea.

              Now I don't really care about tissue anymore. It's fun. It's meat fun as someone so quaintly put it on some other thread but it's just a tip of the iceberg. Meat is only one of many windows which we can peer through, hoping to better understand ourselves.

              Since then I've gone down a slippery slope, or a dense fog of content, of neuro, pain science and biology of human behavior. I've learned that it's not about technique but about knowing the working principle behind it that matters. The brain and the CNS. I've justified a fascination I have for placebo. I better understand and appreciate science. I'm learning to apply critical thinking to concepts I find "wonky".

              I'm learning to be comfortable with uncertainty. To the best of my knowledge, I try to be as honest as I can with my clients. I'm officially biopsychosocial.

              I've attended Diane's DNM workshop. I needed it, something to glue all this together. Cement it even.

              I haven't steered my eyes away since. I'm fatally hooked. In many ways, SS now defines who I am as a therapist and what I aspire to be. It makes me look ahead 10 years and smile at the thought of everything I'll learn.

              Cheers!
              Erik
              If things didn't change we'd stop noticing them very quickly.
              - Barrett Dorko.

              Comment


              • #8
                Bouquet thread: "Why I like SomaSimple"

                I have to get this off my chest....

                For those of you here on SS who are upset about the state of PT and the direction that it is going or the direction that it has been going... I have one important thing to say to you.... yes to you (I would list specific names I don't want to accidentally leave out a name)

                THANK YOU for everything you have done!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                (insert your name here..hehe).... I want to give you a big hug. Thank you again. I truly mean this. I really do. I want you to think of yourself as a high school teacher. How many arrogant, know it all, I'm the king of the world students will one teacher actually connect with during the course of their careers? I don't think its that many... I hope this makes you feel better???

                Well, I have spent thousands of dollars...(shh... don't tell my wife) throughout my PT career to become a better PT. Each course I took made me "better"... "better" outcomes... "better" models of treatment, made me a "better" physical therapist to facilitate patients to improve. But there was always a patient who didn't fit in the method of practice.

                In the few months I have been on SS have, I learned so much more than all those expensive courses. I learned that every patient as a nervous system and that is what we are treating. I learned how to guide my patients to understand pain and become truly better in some way shape for form. Or at the least, I planted a seed in my patients that may sprout the truth/science about their pain. They may not get it or want to get it when they are coming in to see me. I just hope that they someday will. (Lorimer Moseley in Painful Yarns stated that some patients are just not ready.... that was refreshing to read.)

                I have also learned that talking to my coworkers (9 other PTs and 3 PTAs) regarding everything that I learned here is the same as talking to a patient who has been brainwashed with endodermal fallacies. I have found that each coworker gave me a window of opportunity and listened when I explained science related to the way they practiced. I didn't hit them on the head with all this info, but I planted a little seed and kept watering it when ever we discussed all of this great stuffage. Yes there is resistance, change is tough, and I can tell that some will not change one bit... but for me, I am just way to excited and I just don't have the time to waste arguing. Maybe I'm being a little selfish, but I feel the need to read, rather than go up in the front lines like those in that LinkedIn conversation. I just simply give them a copy of an article to read.

                Lastly, I have mentioned this before but most of all, I am grateful for PatrickL for inviting me here... and wow, you are brilliant. If we ever meet in person, I must buy you a drink.

                Sincerely,

                Rex (a very happy, excited, and energetic PT thanks to all of your work)
                Rex Fujiwara, MPT,OCS
                Physical Therapist
                www.painsciencecenter.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  MEBisek

                  Please don't get scared away from the responses.

                  Imagine that you are Neo in the movie "The Matrix". You took the red pill because you wanted to know the truth / reality and you realize that the truth is a bit scary and you kinda don't want to believe it. SomaSimple is that red pill.

                  For example, When Paul Hodges published that people with pain had decreased TA "activation", we thought that we must activate it to decrease pain. This led to the "core and trunk stabilization" craze. It appears that this research study was misinterpreted by the masses. Here is a little blog about it here: http://www.bettermovement.org/2012/r...trol-part-one/

                  Another example is the finding of contractile activity of fascia...

                  Anyway, I just wanted to let you know that most of what we do as PTs, DCs, LMTs and etc have limited validity and reliability. The practitioners here have done a lot of work to share the science and evidence of what we do.

                  So please, do not get scared away, the truth really does hurt. But if you stay, learn, and read whats on here..... what will happen next is pure awesomeness. There is a section for new members... I would read it all!

                  I have found this website to be revolutionary. my patients appreciate it and I have learned soooooooo much in the past few months.

                  Sincerely

                  Rex Fujiwara, MPT, OCS
                  Rex Fujiwara, MPT,OCS
                  Physical Therapist
                  www.painsciencecenter.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hello everyone, I just wanted to give my thanks and express my appreciation in the ways you approach your field. It is relieving to see such honest and scholarly discussion and debate in an accessible public format. As someone who previously "researched" back pain and physical therapy 2 years ago, imagine my shock and bittersweet delight to find out everything I knew was wrong. It is great that such intelligent and rational people are finally making progress.
                    My mind is a bit too swamped to give you the high commendation you all rightfully deserve, so at the very least, thank you for inspiring hope.
                    **WARNING**
                    I am not smart.

                    _..~~///Eat protein. Protein is your mortal soul in unit skillfulness\\\~~.._

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I like this forum because there seems to be so much to learn here.

                      And a sharp mind is needed to protect an open heart in the market place.

                      :rose::rose::rose::rose::rose::rose::rose::rose::rose:

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        An old bouquet but still fresh. From pht3k.
                        Diane
                        www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                        SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                        HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                        Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                        Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                        Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                        @PainPhysiosCan
                        WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                        @WCPTPTPN
                        Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                        @dfjpt
                        SomaSimple on Facebook
                        @somasimple

                        "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                        “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                        “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                        "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                        "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A fresh bouquet from Alice Sanvito. :angel:
                          A Massage Therapist's Guide to SomaSimple
                          Diane
                          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                          @PainPhysiosCan
                          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                          @WCPTPTPN
                          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                          @dfjpt
                          SomaSimple on Facebook
                          @somasimple

                          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This is excellent.
                            Jo Bowyer
                            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              From Alice Sanvito's blog, a post, Let Us Now Praise Those Who Challenge Us, in which SomaSimple is mentioned fairly often. :angel:
                              Diane
                              www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                              SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                              HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                              Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                              Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                              Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                              @PainPhysiosCan
                              WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                              @WCPTPTPN
                              Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                              @dfjpt
                              SomaSimple on Facebook
                              @somasimple

                              "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                              “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                              “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                              "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                              "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                              Comment

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