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  • Ask me anything.

    "Ask me anything" is a new thread in The Genius Brain forum.

    I feel very bold posting this new thread. I have browsed through the Encyclopedia of the Human Brain a bit, and it seems to me that excerpting long bits of it will be good for my own brain, and likely others' too.

    So the concept is, ask me a brain related question, and I will try to (energy and time and willingness permitting) bring out answers from within the books. I know already we can trust anything Ramachandran has to say, or has edited with his finetooth mental/cognitive comb.

    Cheers,
    Diane
    Last edited by Diane; 23-09-2005, 09:52 PM.
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

  • #2
    Diane,

    That's a great idea!
    I will have certainly some motor questions!

    Perhaps I will already find the "table" of the book and post it there?
    Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
    We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

    Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
    If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
    bernard

    Comment


    • #3
      Good idea Bernard.
      Diane
      Diane
      www.dermoneuromodulation.com
      SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
      HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
      Neurotonics PT Teamblog
      Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
      Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
      @PainPhysiosCan
      WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
      @WCPTPTPN
      Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

      @dfjpt
      SomaSimple on Facebook
      @somasimple

      "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

      “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

      “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

      "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

      "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

      Comment


      • #4
        Here is alink to the index:
        (but the abstracts are empty:sad
        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...rks/0122272102

        and the content

        Contents
        J.A. White, Action Potential. J.N. Giedd, E.A. Molloy, and J. Blumenthal, Adolescent Brain Maturation. J.L. Saver, Aggression. L.L. Beason-Held and B. Horwitz, Aging Brain. J.J. Marotta and M. Behrmann, Agnosia. S.Z. Rapcsak and P.M. Beeson, Agraphia. J.W. Olney, Alcohol Damage to the Brain. V.J. Brown and E.M. Bowman, Alertness.R.B. Friedman, Alexia. R.G. Morris and C.L. Worsley, Neuropschology of Alzheimer's Disease. C.R. Long and J.R. Averill, Anger. L. Tabo Connor and L.K. Obler, Anomia. B.J. Casey, N. Yeung, and J. Fossella, Anterior Cingulate Cortex, Role of. E. Vermetten, D.S. Charney, and J.D. Bremner, Anxiety. M.T. Sarno, Aphasia. K.M. Heilman and L.J. Gonzalez-Rothi, Apraxia. D.J. Fellerman, Area V2. R.T. Marrocco and B.A. Field, Arousal. D. Partridge, Artificial Intelligence. N.A. Baumann and D. Pham-Dinh, Astrocytes. S.P. Vecera and S.J. Luck, Attention. H.A. Buchtel, Auditory Agnosia. R.J. Zatorre, Auditory Cortex. W.A. Yost, Auditory Perception. E. Courchesne and K. Pierce, Autism. F. Mor and I.R. Cohen, Autoimmune Diseases. K.S. Rockland, Axon. B. Crosson, L. Maron, A.B. Moore, and L. Grande, Basal Ganglia. F. Sluyter, G. van Luijtelaar, E. de Geus, and W.E. Crusio, Behavioral Neurogenetics.D.L. Delahanty and J.K. Cremeans, Behavioral Neuroimmunology. P.B. Dews, Behavioral Pharmacology. J. Vaid, Bilingualism. R. Gevirtz, Biofeedback. G. Goldenberg, Body Perception Disorders. W.I. Lipkin, T. Briese, and M. Hornig, Borna Disease Virus. M-M. Mesulam, Brain Anatomy and Networks. P. Bach-y-Rita, Brain Damage, Recovery from. H.K.M. Yusuf and K. Islam, Brain Development. K. Maiese, Brain Disease, Organic. M. Keidel and P. Stude, Brain Lesions. W.W. Blessing, Brainstem. M. Crank and P.T. Fox, Broca's Area. C.A. Meyers, Cancer Patients, Cognitive Function. A.J. Friedhoff and R. Silva, Catecholamines. B.J. Knowlton, Categorization. M. Molinari, Cerebellum. J.A. Jane, Jr., A.S. Dumont, D.E. Couture, K.M. Webb, D.B. Ellegala, H. Dayoub, and N.F. Kassell, Cerebral Circulation. D.F. Cechetto and J.C. Topolovec, Cerebral Cortex. D.S. Liebeskind, Cerebral Edema. S. Watkins and A. Rosenberg, Cerebral Palsy. C.M. Filley, Cerebral White Matter Disorders. J.R. Absher, Cerebrovascular Disease.Y. Koutcherov, K.W.S. Ashwell, and G. Paxinos, Chemical Neuroanatomy. M. Gabriel, L. Burhans, A. Talk, and P. Scalf, Cingulate Cortex. C.A. Fuller and P.M. Fuller, Circadian Rhythms. R.E. Clark, Classical Conditioning. N. Raz, Cognitive Aging. J.F. Kihlstrom and L. Park, Cognitive Psychology, Overview. S.A. Kolakowsky-Hayner and J.S. Kreutzer, Cognitive Rehabilitation. P. Gouras, Color Processing and Color Processing Disorders. G.H. Jacobs, Color Vision.M.S. Gazzaniga, Consciousness. R.J. Brown and M.A. Ron, Conversion. K. Baynes, Corpus Callosum. A.B. Butler, Cranial Nerves. M.A. Runco, Creativity. A.W. Kaszniak, Dementia. E.V. Cardemil, Depression. L.A. Taylor and I. Creese, Dopamine. M. Bertini, Dreaming. H.B. Coslett, Dyslexia. P.L. Nunez, EEG. F.H. Lopes da Silva, Electrical Potentials. R. Adolphs and A.S. Heberlein, Emotion. C. Abbadie and G.W. Pasternak, Endorphins and Their Receptors. B. Schmitz, Epilepsy. J.S. George, Event Related Potentials. H.J. Jerison, Evolution of the Brain. C.J. Bruce and H.R. Friedman, Eye Movements. L. Puelles and J.L.R. Rubenstein, Forebrain. L.A. Kemenoff, B.L. Miller, and J.H. Kramer, Frontal Lobe. R.L. Savoy, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (FMRI). S.R. Kleppner and A.J. Tobin, GABA. C.A. Messam, J. Hou, N. Janabi, M.C. Monaco, M. Gravell, and E.O. Major, Glia. J. Epstein, E. Stern, and D. Silbersweig, Hallucinations. J.R. Flanagan and R.S. Johansson, Hand Movements. S. Diamond and G.J. Urban, Headaches. J.F. Brugge and M.A. Howard III, Hearing. R. Hertwig and P.M. Todd, Heuristics. J.C. Glover, Hindbrain. I. Grant, HIV Infection, Neurocognitive Complications of. P.M. Lledo, Homeostatic Mechanisms. J. Vaid, Humor and Laughter. P. Black and C. Ohaegbulam, Hydrocephalus. J.P. Card and L. Rinaman, Hypothalamus.J.C. Mazziotta and R.S.J. Frackowiak, Imaging: Brain Mapping Methods. J.L. Martinez, Jr., S.A.K. Harvey, A. Martinez, and E. Barea-Rodriguez, Information Processing. A. Henik and T.H. Carr, Inhibition. R.J. Sternberg and J.C. Kaufman, Intelligence. B.A. Yi and L.Y. Jan, Ion Channels. H. Tager-Flusberg, Language Acquisition. R.C. Martin, M.R. Newsome, and H. Vu, Language and Lexical Processing. D. Kaplan, Language Disorders. D. Kaplan, Language, Neural Basis of. J.B. Hellige, Laterality. S. Coren, Left-Handedness. J.L. Price, Limbic System. P.N. Johnson-Laird, Logic and Reasoning. R.F. Kaplan, Lyme Encephalopathy. E.H. Taylor, Manic Depressive Illness. A.R. Mayes, Memory Disorders, Organic. K.B. McDermott, Memory, Explicit and Implicit. R.P. Kesner, Memory Neurobiology. J. Jonides, D.T. Badre, and T.D. Wager, Memory, Neuroimaging. J.A. Lucas, Memory, Overview. S.C. Redden, S.R. Hooper, and M. Pope, Mental Retardation. R. Parasuraman and D. Caggiano, Mental Workload. G. Stoll, S. Jander, and M. Schroeter, Microglia. D.L. Oliver and D. Waitzman, Midbrain. M. Sanchez del Rio and S. Silberstein, Migraine. J.T. Barth, J.R. Freeman, and D.K. Broshek, Mild Head Injury. H.L. Laurer, D.F. Meaney, S.S. Margulies, and T.K. McIntosh, Modeling Brain Injury/Trauma. E. Chemerinski and R.G. Robinson, Mood Disorders. P. Verghese and B.R. Beutter, Motion Processing. S.P. Wise and R. Shadmehr, Motor Control. J.H. Kaas and I. Stepniewska, Motor Cortex.P.C. Wong, D.L. Price, and J. Rothstein, Motor Neuron Disease. E. Hazeltine and R. Ivry, Motor Skill. J.F. Soechting and M. Flanders, Movement Regulation. J.R. Alger, MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). L.J. Lobeck, Multiple Sclerosis. B.E. Stein, P. Laurienti, M.T. Wallace, and T.R. Stanford, Multisensory Integration. J.M. Groh and U. Werner-Reiss, Multisensory Integration, Neural Basis of. D.W. Perry, Music and the Brain. R.J. Naylor, Nausea and Vomiting. J.H. Kaas, Neocortex. P.S. Eriksson, Nerve Cells and Memory. J.B. Angevine, Jr., Nervous System, Organization of. P. Sajda, Neural Networks. D. Kondziolka, E. Tyler-Kabara, and C. Achim, Neural Transplantation.C.M> Filley, Neuroanatomy. M.H. Ratner, R.G. Feldman, and R.F. White, Neurobehavioral Toxicology. L.J. Martin, Neurodegenerative Disorders. J.R. Evans, Neurofeedback. B.R. Ransom and A.M. Brown, Neuroglia. G. Ganis and S.M. Kosslyn, Neuroimaging. M.E. Martone and M.H. Ellisman, Neuron. B. Ahren, Neuropeptides and Islet Function. E.A. Workman, Neuropharmacology. D. Bavelier and H. Neville, Neuro-Plasticity, Developmental. A.P. Nelson and M.M. Searl, Neuropsychological Assessment. L.C. Hartlage, Neuropsychological Assessment, Pediatric. J.H. Schwartz, Neurotransmitters. L.M. Mendell, Nociceptors. C. Drouin and J.P. Tassin, Norepinephrine. K. Wynn, Number Processing and Arithmetic. P. Williams, Object Perception. E.A. DeYoe, Occipital Lobe. R.L. Doty, Olfaction.C.M. Knapp, Opiates. H.H. Zingg, Oxytocin. A.D. Craig, Pain. D. Fishbain, Pain and Psychopathology.M.D. Yahr, Parkinson's Disease. W.R. Uttal, Pattern Recognition. L.J. Martin, Peptides, Hormones, and the Brain, and Spinal Cord. A.V. Krassioukov, Peripheral Nervous System. H. Flor, Phantom Limb Pain. M. Macmillan, Phineas Gage. A. Kertesz and D.G. Munoz, Pick's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia. R.J. Morecraft and E.H. Yeterian, Prefrontal Cortex. A.D. Wagner and W. Koutstaal, Priming. H.A. Kretzschmar, Prion Diseases. R.E. Mayer, Problem Solving. E.H.F. De Haan, Prosopagnosia. D. Presti, Psychoactive Drugs. S. Campeau, Psychoneuroendocrinology.D.L. Felten and M.E. Maida, Psychoneuroimmunology. D. Lykken, Psychophysiology. V. Mann, Reading Disorders, Developmental. R.P.N. Rao, Receptive Field. H. Sivers, J. Schooler, and J.J. Freyd, Recovered Memories. D.T. Cerutti, Reinforcement, Reward, and Punishment. H. Kazemi and D.C. Johnson, Respiration. J.E. Dowling, Retina.L.H. Finkel and S.C. Yen, Salience. D.V. Jeste and L.T.E. Zorrilla, Schizophrenia. M. Grossman and P.L. Koenig, Semantic Memory. J.P. Rauschecker, Sensory Deprivation. L.S. Allen and R.A. Gorski, Sex Differences in the Human Brain.J.D. Baldwin and J.I. Baldwin, Sexual Behavior. S.L. Zup and N.G. Forger, Sexual Differentiation, Hormones and. L. Regev, C. Avina, and W. O'Donohue, Sexual Dysfunction. M.S. George and J.P. Lorberbaum, Sexual Function. G. Vallar, Short-Term Memory. C.A. Kushida, Sleep Disorders. B. Landau, Spatial Cognition. R.L. De Valois, K.K> De Valois, Spatial Vision. K.R. Kluender, Speech. D.J. Newport and C.B. Nemeroff, Stress. B. McEwen and S. Lupien, Stress: Hormonal and Neural Aspects. A.R. Zazulia, Stroke. B.S. Brodsky and J.J. Mann, Suicide. B.E. Stein, M.T. Wallace, and T.R. Stanford, Superior Colliculus. M. Baudry, Synapses and Synaptic Transmission and Integration. F. Varoqueaux and N. Brose, Synaptogenesis. C.L. Reed, Tactile Perception. M.A. Barry and M.E. Frank, Taste. H.A. Buchtel, Temporal Lobes. C. Ohye, Thalamus and Thalamic Damage. D.L. Harrington and R.M. Rao, Time Passage, Neural Substrates.V. Eapen and M.M. Robertson, Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. T.J. Collier and J.R. Sladek, Jr., Transplantation. J.F. Kihlstrom, Unconscious, The. E. Wertman and K.M. Heilman, Unilateral Neglect. D.E. Scott, Ventricular System. M. Sarter and J.P. Bruno, Vigilance. K.E. Anderson and J.M. Silver, Violence and the Brain. R. Shapley and N. Rubin, Vision: Brain Mechanisms. M.G.P. Rosa, Visual Cortex. R.D. Jones and D. Tranel, Visual Disorders. A.E. Wiencken-Barger and V.A. Casagrande, Visual System Development and Neural Activity. E.M. Saffran, Wernicke's Area. S. Della Sala and R.H. Logie, Working Memory.
        Last edited by bernard; 24-09-2005, 08:12 AM.
        Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
        We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

        Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
        If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
        bernard

        Comment


        • #5
          Hurray Bernard!
          I looked up ideomotor movement in the index.. alas, there is only a line about it in conjunction with apraxia. But look at all the other great stuff.
          Diane
          Diane
          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
          @PainPhysiosCan
          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
          @WCPTPTPN
          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

          @dfjpt
          SomaSimple on Facebook
          @somasimple

          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

          Comment


          • #6
            I will search for ideomotor movement.
            Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
            We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

            Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
            If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
            bernard

            Comment


            • #7
              Exp Brain Res. 2005 Apr;162(3):346-56. Epub 2004 Dec 15. Related Articles, Links
              Intention-based and stimulus-based mechanisms in action selection.

              Waszak F, Wascher E, Keller P, Koch I, Aschersleben G, Rosenbaum DA, Prinz W.

              Department of Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Amalienstr. 33, 80799, Munich, Germany. f.waszak@gmx.net

              Human actions can be classified as being either more stimulus-based or more intention-based. According to the ideomotor framework of action control, intention-based actions primarily refer to anticipated action effects (in other words response-stimulus [R-S] bindings), whereas stimulus-based actions are commonly assumed to be more strongly determined by stimulus-response [S-R] bindings. We explored differences in the functional signatures of both modes of action control in a temporal bisection task. Participants either performed a choice response by pressing one out of two keys in response to a preceding stimulus (stimulus-based action), or pressed one out of two keys to produce the next stimulus (intention-based action). In line with the ideomotor framework, we found intention-based actions to be shifted in time towards their anticipated effects (the next stimulus), whereas stimulus-based actions were shifted towards their preceding stimulus. Event-related potentials (ERPs) in the EEG revealed marked differences in action preparation for the two tasks. The data as a whole provide converging evidence for functional differences in the selection of motor actions as a function of their triggering conditions, and support the notion of two different modes of action selection, one being exogenous or mainly stimulus-driven, the other being endogenous or mainly intention-driven.

              PMID: 15599722 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
              Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
              We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

              Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
              If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
              bernard

              Comment


              • #8
                Hello Bernard and mainly Diane :angel: ,


                So, I do will ask! Brain has become my new addiction.

                In another thread, you both talked about Dorko and his ideomotor thoughts, problems that Diane classified as 'inside out', i.e. the problem arise within the person, so, treatment must be inside out as well. The outside in treatment would be incomplete or paliative.
                I read the two texts of Dorko too, but found them too difficult to understand. Will keep trying, just like JOHNNIE WALKER!

                From the above, I ask you Diane and why not Bernard:

                -before coming to SOMASIMPLE, I was a bit like Sunderland and I must confess, like Descartes. Now, my thoughts are very different. What is there of newest in movement treatment as an inside out approach?

                -Is the inside out approach so simple, like simple contact? Or feldenkrais and Hanna could be considered an inside out?

                Neuromatrix, mirror therapy, recognition hand laterality, etc are NEW! Is there anything else? Am I stopped in the time?


                Flávio.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Flavio,
                  Is the inside out approach so simple, like simple contact? Or feldenkrais and Hanna could be considered an inside out?
                  I think Feldenkrais and Hannah are inside out too. Barrett Dorko had the idea for Simple Contact after he did a 4-day workshop with Feldenkrais. My experience with Somatics was that it was inside out, even though a detailed map was provided i.e., the cat stretch series. Tai Chi, yoga, all these things could be catagorized as inside out motor or auto neuromodulation, even though they provide detailed maps too. No one is moving anything except the person's brain inside their own "spacesuit" or body. No else one is "neuromodulating" them. They are even more "inside out" in that way than "simple contact", which requires minimal simple contact from another individual.

                  Neuromatrix, mirror therapy, recognition hand laterality, etc are NEW! Is there anything else? Am I stopped in the time?
                  There is more. Much, much more. I gather that only the surface of this exploration has been scratched so far.
                  Cheers,
                  Diane
                  Diane
                  www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                  SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                  HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                  Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                  @PainPhysiosCan
                  WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                  @WCPTPTPN
                  Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                  @dfjpt
                  SomaSimple on Facebook
                  @somasimple

                  "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                  “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                  “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                  "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                  "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So Diane,

                    could you show me some more examples of newest treatments? Be them inside out ('hands in' ??) or outside in (although the latter has not convinced me so much anymore... part because of the guilty of SOMASIMPLE)

                    I visited the website that was in the paper posted by Bernard in another thread:

                    http://www.cingulumneurosciences.org (how the Cingulate NeuroTherapeutics) amongst other things.



                    Flávio.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Flavio, I think you are ahead of me in applications. That link is great. I don't think concepts are as far away from neuromatrix theory as Vogt seems to assert.
                      Diane
                      Diane
                      www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                      SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                      HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                      Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                      @PainPhysiosCan
                      WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                      @WCPTPTPN
                      Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                      @dfjpt
                      SomaSimple on Facebook
                      @somasimple

                      "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                      “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                      “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                      "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                      "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Diane,

                        I am not sure about your statement. It is a fact that I really know some concepts you don't, but the opposite is also true. I am not interested anymore in 'outside in' / 'hands on' therapies. With the wide field of neuroscience and with its better perspectives, how not to change from one to another? 'Inside out' / 'hands-in' therapies are my passion now. But see, I am not saying that I do not use anymore 'hands-on' techniques.

                        Before argumenting with you all here about that 'global technique' called GPR (Global Postural Reeducation) or if you prefer, PGR, I have grown too much in things that I was not prepared to involve myself in. Of course I knew them, but I really was not prepared to accept them at all.

                        This way, I underpin my question: Do you have some more examples of new treatments means, beside mirror therapy, lateral hand recognition, virtual body exercises, pain neuroscience education, graded and pacing activities?


                        Kind regards,


                        Flávio.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Do you have some more examples of new treatments means, beside mirror therapy, lateral hand recognition, virtual body exercises, pain neuroscience education, graded and pacing activities?
                          No, I think that about covers the gamut, Flavio.
                          ,
                          Diane
                          Diane
                          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                          @PainPhysiosCan
                          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                          @WCPTPTPN
                          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                          @dfjpt
                          SomaSimple on Facebook
                          @somasimple

                          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Diane,

                            I have just remembered another therapy: sensory discrimination. It can be used for and is being heavily studied in patients with repetitive strain injury and focal hand distonia. Of course it can be added with the other therapies stated above.


                            Flávio.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Flavio,

                              The changes are happenning ever "internally" but may be triggered by an external mean.

                              Simple Contact is close to Feldenkreis but uses an autonomic/automatic lever.
                              Felkenkreis, Hanna focuse their approaches to awareness.
                              Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
                              We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

                              Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
                              If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
                              bernard

                              Comment

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