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Seminar on stroke rehab in Helsinki 27th April 2017

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  • Seminar on stroke rehab in Helsinki 27th April 2017

    Dear All,

    on 27th April 2017: Seminar on "Road to True Recovery with Vasa Concept for stroke Rehabilitation" by Rajul Vasa (India) will be held for one day in Helsinki.

    Dr.Gunilla Frykberg (Sweden), Dr. Liisa Paavola Finland), and Mari Tynkkynen (Finland) will be sharing their experiences in the seminar.

    contact Anna Nurmi for more information.
    Anna Nurmi ..............anna.nurmi@medirex.fi
    Working on total solution for brain stroke patients with VASA CONCEPT
    www.brainstrokes.com
    Rajul Vasa

  • #2
    Best solution may be prevention

    Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association
    Stroke. 2017

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians.

    It has been estimated that for every symptomatic stroke, there are ≈10 silent brain infarcts.2 As a result of this high prevalence, silent cerebrovascular disease is the most commonly encountered incidental finding on brain imaging
    http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/48/2/e44
    Marcel

    "Evolution is a tinkerer not an engineer" F.Jacob
    "Without imperfection neither you nor I would exist" Stephen Hawking

    Comment


    • #3
      stroke rehab

      totally agree, prevention is better than cure.
      Working on total solution for brain stroke patients with VASA CONCEPT
      www.brainstrokes.com
      Rajul Vasa

      Comment


      • #4
        You may be interested in reading this from NOI

        Graded Motor Imagery post stroke

        February 21, 2017

        There are obvious motor changes that pose a problem when treating stroke patients – very limited, or at times, no active active function of a limb. Graded Motor Imagery (GMI) can sneak under the radar of these physical difficulties, as all of component steps of GMI can be performed without needing to actively move the limb. So should we be using this feasible, inexpensive treatment in the clinic?

        How did they provide GMI?

        Time: 1 hour session, 5 days a week for 4 weeks of treatment: total 20 sessions.
        Inclusion criteria: first ever ischemic or haemorrhagic stroke; aged 18-75 years; absence of apraxia or sever aphasia.
        Control group (n=14): 2 hours of individually tailored motor rehabilitation per day.
        Experimental group (n=14): 2 hours of individually tailored motor rehabilitation per day, with 1 hour of that time being allocated to GMI.
        Primary outcome measures: Two functional assessments of upper limb
        Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT)
        Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Limb (FMA)


        What happened?

        10 out of the 14 post-stroke patients receiving GMI treatment showed important differences in upper limb function, compared to 4 out of the 14 in the control group – perhaps the first step to show the potential benefit that GMI can have on motor function
        Link

        https://noijam.com/2017/02/21/graded...y-post-stroke/
        Marcel

        "Evolution is a tinkerer not an engineer" F.Jacob
        "Without imperfection neither you nor I would exist" Stephen Hawking

        Comment


        • #5
          Spasticity and Stroke rehab

          Neuroscience considers loss of neurons following stroke as irreversible and considers complex sensory-motor symptoms as inevitable and proposes palliative treatment approach to reduce magnitude of symptoms and promotes compensatory control for function. Vasa Concept proposes that though lesion and loss of neurons are irreversible, one can make lesion irrelevant and can put the patient on the road to true recovery of lost control by “Switching On” the “Switched Off” cerebellum from initial shock to cerebellum with striking of lesion.

          “Brain, Body, and Gravity” are the 3 best tools to “Switch On” cerebellum to promote true recovery. Vasa Concept proposes that spasticity is not an impairment from loss of neurons but is perhaps a solution by the self-organizing brain in self safety by resisting movement by turning flail muscles spastic. Goal oriented brain’s goal with spastic contraction could be perhaps to defend center of mass (COM) safety when paretic muscles cannot contribute towards controlling COM safety. Spasticity ogre can be completely obliterated and can be prevented from surfacing at all by re-reorganizing self-organized brain by expanding boundaries of COM movement.
          Working on total solution for brain stroke patients with VASA CONCEPT
          www.brainstrokes.com
          Rajul Vasa

          Comment

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