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  • Ref US Military Physical Therapy

    I've had some requests for this material lately and haven't been able to locate it.
    Here are some quick notes, it's a work in progress:
    Advantages of being a PT in the US Military

    -Unlimited direct access to patients
    -Complete autonomy in plans of care, to include all aspects of treatment

    -Medical staff appointment and selected privileges:
    ​-Ordering imaging: plain films, CT scans, and MRI
    ​-Ordering electrodiagnostic tests (EMG/NCV)
    -Prescribing limited medications (dexamethasone for iontophoresis, Fluococinide/steroid ointment for phonophoresis, limited NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen, etc)
    -Writing work excusals and recommendations for sick leave

    -Highly educated and competent peer group
    -Opportunities for professional growth and additional training such as funded research doctorates (PhD and DSc)
    -Federal holidays and a day-off schedule during holiday periods
    -Thirty days paid vacation a year
    -Military training opportunities – deployment, weapons qualification, military skills training
    -Travel the nation and the world in service to your country and its military forces




    Sent from mobile using Tapatalk
    Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
    Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
    Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

    Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


    The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

  • #2
    I have thought of going back into the Air Force as a PT so many times I have lost count. The thing that takes me away from the thought is picturing my 2 dachshunds shaking on the tarmac as we get ready to fly overseas for a 3 year stint in England where they get to enjoy a 6 month quarantine. If they were not so important to me and my family I would be back in a second. I know, I am a softie. But it would be cool to get saluted....
    Michael Heinrich DPT.

    My opinions and statements on this site are not a reflection of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the Federal government.

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    • #3
      Do therapists go through bootcamp? Is there an age cut off to join?

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      • #4
        http://www.baylor.edu/graduate/pt/


        Sent from mobile using Tapatalk
        Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
        Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
        Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

        Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


        The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

        Comment


        • #5
          I would recommend the armed services to just about anyone. My internship at Travis Air Force Base was awesome, so I figure the rest of the branches are probably pretty cool as well.
          Nicholas Marki, P.T.

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          • #6
            Australia has very similar set up

            http://www.defencejobs.gov.au/army/j...ysiotherapist/

            http://www.physiotherapy.asn.au/APAW...iotherapy.aspx

            The major concern I've had when considering this sort of thing is impact on family (moving, elderly parents etc).
            Dan
            Tactile Raconteur

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            • #7
              we had recently hired a therapist who just got out of the air force. the downside for her situation was she only did evals and re-evals with assistive staff doing all treatments.

              not sure about other branches or bases but something to look into if considering joining.

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              • #8
                we had recently hired a therapist who just got out of the air force. the downside for her situation was she only did evals and re-evals with assistive staff doing all treatments.
                So, Jason, when's the last time you treated a patient?

                In addition to Jason, I'm acquainted with at least a couple of other military PTs, and they've all treated their own patients. I realize that there are certain support staff available in military rehab clinics, but my impression has always been that it's the PT's professional judgment about how the care plan is carried out, just as it is in civilian clinics. In fact, military PTs have more autonomy in that regard, not less.
                John Ware, PT
                Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists
                "Nothing can bring a man peace but the triumph of principles." -R.W. Emerson
                “If names be not correct, language is not in accordance with the truth of things. If language be not in accordance with the truth of things, affairs cannot
                be carried on to success.” -The Analects of Confucius, Book 13, Verse 3

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                • #9
                  I certainly hope that Davis Monthan Air Force base is the outlier in terms of care but that is how they worked as of last summer.

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                  • #10
                    I just thought I would provide some info now since I have finally seen it. It is a year old but I thought I would share some info. I am retired from the US Army, but was in communications, eight years active with five in Germany, and 21 years total including the Reserves. I am not sure how may folks have spent time like this.

                    My school for PT was in Augusta, GA, and one of my clinical rotations was at Ft. Gordon, GA. I am here trying to get my brain working properly following a recent brain surgery, so am reading a lot lately to get going again. Nice information about the military in the initial post.
                    Last edited by maddog; 06-07-2015, 12:07 AM.
                    Tom Laudino
                    Lebanon, NH

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                    • #11
                      thanks

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                      • #12
                        Interested in Army Baylor Program

                        Hello, I am currently a PTA student interested in furthering my education to a DPT. I have read and heard many great things about becoming a military PT. Here are some questions that I couldn't find answers to. Thanks


                        1. What are some things to prepare myself for the curriculum and hectic schedule of the Army Baylor program?


                        2. Do you get to choose where you work after finishing the program, or do they send you where the need is?


                        3. What are some things you wish you knew before being accepted?


                        4. I was reading on the Army Baylor FAQs and didn't see anything about if you had a choice to choose between branches.


                        5. How is working as a military PT and then going back to the private sector or a regular clinic?


                        6. Besides being a military PT, what are the other duties as a military officer? Are you expected to manage a small unit? How does that work?

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                        • #13
                          Hello Ky
                          Happy to respond.
                          1. Make sure your fitness and academics are on point.
                          2. Haha. No. It's not a travel agency. You go where you're sent. They try to work with your desires and goals when they can.
                          3. Hmm. This job is 50% psychology and your ability to connect and motivate people is as important as other skills.
                          4. I'm not sure about branch options when you commission. Obviously the Army is the way to go. Haha.
                          5. I dunno I went from civilian practice to the military. I'm not looking forward to the reverse.
                          6. You can do a variety of things. I've been a staff officer helping set policy, a casualty assistance officer (look it up), and now I'm Assistant Chief of Staff at Walter Reed. So there are leadership and management positions available in addition to clinical management.

                          Brief responses but let me know if you've any follow on questions.
                          Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
                          Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
                          Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

                          Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


                          The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

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                          • #14
                            I would think the biggest problem in military is high rates of self harm ( PT's too?). 40%

                            higher than general public.

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                            • #15
                              Hi Jason!


                              Down through the years, I've always enjoyed your various avatars--from badass to friendly. I like the latest cool, contemplative pose.

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