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Sliding interphase zones in a peripheral nerve

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  • VIS Sliding interphase zones in a peripheral nerve

    Nerve Injury and Repair
    Prof Göran Lundborg Churchill Livingstone, 1988
    Sliding interphase zones in a peripheral nerve
    Movie by Bernard Delalande (somasimple 2016)
    Music by Marconi Union

    [YT]L6Ib2sk5mUc[/YT]
    Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
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    If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
    bernard

  • #2
    VERY cool visual. Thanks Bernard!
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    • #3
      So great but I have a question. The upper artery appears to stretch and fill once at the end of the stretch. Is this an artifact of the animation or is it an indication that the blood doesn't flow optimally until the artery is in the fully taut position? Hope this doesn't sound too stupid, but I really am curious.

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      • #4
        Actually, the longer a vessel is, the narrower it will be. That's just physics.
        That's why, in treatment, it's good to consider shortening (and therefore widening) neural containers, which include vessels.
        Diane
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Agashem View Post
          So great but I have a question. The upper artery appears to stretch and fill once at the end of the stretch. Is this an artifact of the animation or is it an indication that the blood doesn't flow optimally until the artery is in the fully taut position? Hope this doesn't sound too stupid, but I really am curious.
          Not stupid at all. Here is the original page of the book with the explanation.
          The artery flow optimally when tension is low (but not too low). It is not an artifact but at full tension the vessel is quite "stressed" (pulled) out the nerve. And of course, the blood flow is quite null at the end.
          Attached Files
          Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
          We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

          Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
          If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
          bernard

          Comment

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