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Lorimer Moseley TEDx Talk, 15 minutes, Why Things Hurt

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  • VIS Lorimer Moseley TEDx Talk, 15 minutes, Why Things Hurt

    [YT]gwd-wLdIHjs[/YT]
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

  • #2
    Lots more Moseley, here.

    Keep your eye on him. He is out there, changing PT all by himself, without even looking like he's trying. He's just doing it. Seemingly effortlessly.
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

    Comment


    • #3
      There's an effort, believe me.

      What impresses me is the title of this last one.

      The question, "Why does he/she hurt?" is both answerable and irritating. "Why things hurt" certainly comes across as less abrasive and challenging.

      "What to do about hurting" seems a good follow up.
      Barrett L. Dorko

      Comment


      • #4
        He answers "Why Things Hurt" early in the video, by pointing out that they don't. Check out the bit about the knife, that it has all these qualities, cold, sharp, etc., but it doesn't have pain. Pain is in the brain, and if the knife goes into your body somewhere, and you see it, the brain will project "pain" to that place. Even if that place is somebody else's arm, or a mannequin's, or whatever.

        It's that threat to "self" bit that he is so interested in, and constantly messes with, by dislocating sense of self with his fake arm and fake finger experiments.
        Diane
        www.dermoneuromodulation.com
        SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
        HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
        Neurotonics PT Teamblog
        Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
        Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
        @PainPhysiosCan
        WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
        @WCPTPTPN
        Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

        @dfjpt
        SomaSimple on Facebook
        @somasimple

        "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

        “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

        “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

        "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

        "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

        Comment


        • #5
          I can't help but think that torture begins by showing the victim what will be employed.

          Scarry gains her understanding of pain’s effect through what she’s learned from the victims of torture. And although that circumstance leading to painful sensation is not something we are commonly familiar with, the perception of pain secondary to nociception otherwise is not essentially different.

          She says that pain “unmakes” us. That it systematically destroys our familiar world by reducing our ability to live in it in our familiar ways. First and foremost it destroys language, and it is well known that finding words to accurately describe our physically painful experience is a difficult task. It “unmakes” us even further by restricting the pursuit of movement that had previously been part of our lives-the ways in which we express ourselves nonverbally. When a child is told to “sit still and sit straight and to be quiet,” something eerily similar occurs.

          From this
          Barrett L. Dorko

          Comment


          • #6
            Barrett,

            While showing the victim what will be employed may be the beginning of torture, I've been thinking about the common denominator found in all torture and I keep coming around to something like "the prolonged denial of the expression of instinctive behavior."

            Do you think that's too simplistic?
            "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

            Comment


            • #7
              It is a simplification. An effective and succinct one.

              As Scarry says (paraphrasing): It is the creative act (and creative acts are distinctly instinctive) that allows the tortured to recover.
              Barrett L. Dorko

              Comment


              • #8
                I thought of this through various reading including Scarry. For instance in her book The Body in Pain (already referenced) she notes (p.48):

                Even the most small and benign of bodily acts becomes a form of agency. In The First Circle, Solzhenitsyn describes how prisoners, while sleeping, were forced to keep their hands outside the blanket, and he writes, "It was a diabolical rule. It is a natural, deep-rooted unnoticed human habit to hide one's hands while asleep, to hold them against one's body." The prisoner's body--in its physical strengths, in its sensory powers, in its needs and wants, in its ways of self-delight, and finally even, as here, in its small and moving gestures of friendship toward itself--is, like the prisoner's voice, made a weapon against him, made to betray him on behalf of the enemy, made to be the enemy.
                I also thought about what issues people have with factory farming. Those issues usually come down, at least, to disallowing the animals to behave instinctively. For instance, not allowing sufficient room to move or failing to provide an environment needed for a particular behavior such as preventing the instinct of chickens to scratch and peck soil by keeping them in wire cages.

                I fully appreciate the role tissue damage usually plays in torture but it seems neither a necessary nor sufficient condition to label something as torturous.
                Last edited by Jon Newman; 01-12-2011, 05:37 AM.
                "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another good presentation for workcover in SA

                  Hi All

                  Check this out!! http://conference.workcover.com/sess...return-to-work :clap1:

                  Weni
                  Last edited by weni888; 01-12-2011, 05:36 AM. Reason: spelling

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Download

                    You can download the presentation!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good presentation, but he needs to get someone to proofread and edit a bit...
                      Love the forest fire warning sign from Canada!
                      We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

                      I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
                      Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

                      Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

                      We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

                      Comment

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