Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pamphlet 2: the role of therapist

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Good points Luke. Maybe "role of the therapist" is a bad description for the pamphlet. Sounds like we are trying to define "what is physical therapy"... could be trouble.
    Christopher Bryhan MPT

    "You are more likely to learn something by finding surprises in your own behavior then by hearing surprising facts about people in general"
    Daniel Kahneman - Thinking Fast and Slow

    Comment


    • #17
      I don't see any problem with describing the role of the therapist - I agree it should not be the title of the pamphlet.

      Jon, I think it may actually empower the patient to have a good idea of the role of the therapist. The description clearly establishes the type of involvement the patient can expect, and thus establishes clear boundaries and expectations of responsibility.
      It also removes any possibility of perception of 'mystery" or "woo-woo" from the therapeutic interaction.
      It will depend on the actual wording whether it sounds like 'selling the therapist'.

      Mind you, I am only looking at my own version for these considerations.......
      We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

      I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
      Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

      Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

      We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

      Comment


      • #18
        Hi Bas,

        I've got a few ideas. Not so much wording for the pamphlet but ideas that already have acceptance from the powers that be. I'll try to add those tomorrow.

        Luke I think you're probably correct in that if people decide to print off a bunch of pamphlets, the PT role pamphlet slot will not need to be filled nearly as often as the pain one.

        On an interesting side note, do people suppose the information included in the pamphlet regarding the role of the PT is going to be unique to PT or would it similarly apply to Chiro, MT, Osteopath, etc?
        "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

        Comment


        • #19
          Interesting question indeed, Jon.
          On first glance, from a scope of practice perspective, I'd say that this info is not exclusive to the PT profession. On second glance, it would require a MAJOR revolution in thinking of the chiros, osteopaths and MTs who are in my area.....
          The pamphlet could be mostly educational for themselves first, and then later hopefully for their patients.

          I have been modifying my own 1-page hand outs over the last 4-5 weeks for each individual patient; thanks to you folks, I have seen that it is possible just have one.....
          We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

          I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
          Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

          Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

          We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

          Comment


          • #20
            I suspect that it will be of variable interest to all, but many (including PTs?)would develop different approaches compared with ours, or maybe alter existing traditional ones slightly.

            Nari

            Comment


            • #21
              This is from our professional organization (Guide To PT Practice) but I think it is generalizable to PTs across borders.

              Disability depends on both the capacities of the individual and the expectations that are imposed on the individual by those in the immediate social environment, most often family and caregivers. Changing the expectations of a patient, family, or cargiver in a social context...may help to diminish disability as much as supplying the patient with assistive devices or increasing the patient's physical ability to use them.
              and

              When the physical therapist has determined which impairments are related to the patient's functional limitations, the therapist must determine which impairments may be remedied by physical therapy intervention. If they cannot be remedied, the physical therapist can help the patient compensate by using other abilities to accomplish the intended goal. The task or the environment also may be modified so that the task can be performed within the restrictions that the patient's condition imposes. These two approaches focus on "enablement" rather than remediation of "disablement," and they may be characterized as the classical physical therapist response to the disablement process.
              What I get out of this is that the therapist has a job of figuring what impairments are actually relevant and remdiable by the therapist themselves (versus by the patient (themselves or with help.)) Also, it is important for us to work clarify the patient's/caregiver's expectations, values and goals.

              Anyone want to try to translate that into pamphletese?
              "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

              Comment


              • #22
                Here is another attempt. I tried to take Bas' improvements and the information below into account.
                Attached Files
                Cory Blickenstaff, PT, OCS

                Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast
                Leaps and Bounds Blog
                My youtube channel

                Comment


                • #23
                  Cory

                  Sounds good.

                  I like the phrase:
                  Know pain, or no gain.
                  A possible alternative might be: Understand pain or no gain?

                  Nari

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Nari,

                    That phrase is from Jon, which I believe he got from Butler?

                    Luke,

                    Does this fall more under patient education as you mentioned below? I was thinking the pamphlet should answer the questions "what do they do in therapy? or How will they help?" that comes from the patient contemplating their options.
                    Cory Blickenstaff, PT, OCS

                    Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast
                    Leaps and Bounds Blog
                    My youtube channel

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by BB View Post
                      Here is another attempt. I tried to take Bas' improvements and the information below into account.
                      Nice attempt and realy very informative

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X