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  • Ref Consumer info thread

    I'm starting this thread as a sort of consumer's "red file." What I'm specifically soliciting are articles written for the lay public that help convey an updated understanding of pain sciences in the context of neuromusculoskeletal medicine.

    For example, this NY Times article by Gina Kolata-- The Pain May Be Real, but the Scan Is Deceiving

    Add your own finds here.
    "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

  • #2
    Good idea Jon. Maybe it should be called "Consumer Red File."
    This sounds familiar (from the article):
    “We often see patients who have already had M.R.I. scans,” Dr. Mirza said. “They are fixated on the abnormality and come to a surgeon to try to get the abnormality fixed. They’ll come in with the report in hand.”
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

    Comment


    • #3
      knowing .....

      However, Dr. Modic said, there was one effect of being told — patients felt worse about themselves when they knew they had a bulging disk. “If I tell you that you have a degenerated disk, basically I’m telling you you’re ugly,” Dr. Modic said.

      really good article jon-----important to

      Comment


      • #4
        Way too tired? by Judy Foreman at the Boston Globe.
        "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

        Comment


        • #5
          Jon, that article is aimed straight at me!

          Bruce Charlton mentioned the same in a paper on fatigue. I found a reference to his site here at SS: http://www.hedweb.com/bgcharlton/

          He hypothesised that we could consider fatigue as a type of pain, and meds as pain killers or anti-inflammatory rather than mood modifiers. Food for thought.

          Mary
          Guess learning is a lifestyle, not a passtime.
          Those people who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do. ~ Isaac Asimov

          Comment


          • #6
            This needs to be here: Association for Ethics in Spine Surgery.

            Click the "News/Media Updates" to see a list of very interesting and relevant articles for the layperson. Especially applicable to anyone considering a surgical procedure for spine pain.
            Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
            Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
            Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

            Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


            The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

            Comment


            • #7
              Rod posted this elsewhere and I thought I'd post here as well. Thanks Rod.

              I personally have some issues with the language but that doesn't mean others will.
              Attached Files
              Last edited by Jon Newman; 24-01-2009, 07:24 PM.
              "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

              Comment


              • #8
                Variable-quality studies show that spinal manipulation, massage, exercise therapy,acupuncture, yoga, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and progressive relaxation are nondrug therapies that may be helpful for low back pain.
                How could anyone not have issues with the language?
                How can someone put spinal manipulation in the same sentence as yoga, acupuncture and relaxation as if the relevant evidence is equivalent???
                Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
                Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
                Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

                Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


                The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had the same problem with the language as well, but at least this develops a framework to explore the relative efficacies of each guideline. CPGs are useful for that purpose if nothing else. I reviewed the article for mentions of acupuncture to see where they derived this particular guideline and came up with the following articles. It will take some time to look at the methodology, but it's nice to know they didn't just pull it out of their...hats.

                  Cherkin DC, Eisenberg D, Sherman KJ, Barlow W, Kaptchuk TJ, Street J,
                  et al. Randomized trial comparing traditional Chinese medical acupuncture, therapeutic massage, and self-care education for chronic low back pain. Arch Intern Med. 2001;161:1081-8.

                  Furlan AD, van Tulder M, Cherkin D, Tsukayama H, Lao L, Koes B, et al. Acupuncture and dry-needling for low back pain: an updated systematic review within the framework of the cochrane collaboration. Spine. 2005;30:944-63.

                  Manheimer E, White A, Berman B, Forys K, Ernst E. Meta-analysis: acupuncture for low back pain. Ann Intern Med. 2005;142:651-63.

                  Kalauokalani D, Cherkin DC, Sherman KJ, Koepsell TD, Deyo RA. Lessons from a trial of acupuncture and massage for low back pain: patient expectations and treatment effects. Spine. 2001;26:1418-24.
                  Rod Henderson, PT, ScD, OCS
                  It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into. — Jonathan Swift

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I personally have some issues with the language but that doesn't mean others will.--Jon
                    I didn't realize how generalizable that statement was.
                    "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I reviewed the article for mentions of acupuncture to see where they derived this particular guideline and came up with the following articles. It will take some time to look at the methodology, but it's nice to know they didn't just pull it out of their...hats.
                      Lucky for us there is Luke, whose just published an excellent article on therapuetic needling.
                      Cory Blickenstaff, PT, OCS

                      Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast
                      Leaps and Bounds Blog
                      My youtube channel

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I overheard someone in the Sc.D. program at Tech is doing some investigation into dry needling. I'm looking forward to reading Luke's review as I know nothing about it.
                        Rod Henderson, PT, ScD, OCS
                        It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into. — Jonathan Swift

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jon Newman View Post
                          I didn't realize how generalizable that statement was.
                          Heh.
                          I did have other issues, that's just the one that jumped out at me the most.
                          Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
                          Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
                          Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

                          Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


                          The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

                          Comment

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