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  • #91
    My guess is that he really doesn't care.
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
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    • #92
      Originally posted by Diane View Post
      My guess is that he really doesn't care.
      I find that hard to fathom but there's lots I don't understand.

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      • #93
        Hi Alice,

        Kim's thread is one of the first one's I read here at SS, after having typed : What does Diane Jacobs think of Trigger Points? in the search bar. I certainly got a much more plausible answer to my question than from anything I could have read in the Big Reds ( Travell and Simons books). I was a big Trigger Point person too.

        There is quite a lot to be gleaned from Barrett's more recent Placeholder series as well.

        If anyone can make a change in how our community thinks about these things, it's going to be you. Thanks for this.
        Last edited by caro; 31-07-2013, 12:54 PM.
        Carol Lynn Chevrier LMT
        " The truth is, people may see things differently. But they don't really want to. '' Don Draper.

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        • #94
          Good grief, the man is learned and knows boatloads more than I ever will, and that's why I feel sometimes like who am I to challenge someone of his stature?
          This comment makes me think about a recent article published in The Atlantic regarding how spectacularly wrong Linus Pauling was about vitamin C. He was a pretty smart and learned guy- what with his two Nobel Prizes.

          All the more reason that authoritative scholars need to be vigorously questioned. When they make assertions that have tremendous impact, the consequences can cause reverberations that last, as in the Pauling case, for decades into the present day.

          So, go ask, Alice.



          [To be fair, Stephen Barrett, of Quackwatch, addressed the Linus Pauling and vitamin C issue way back in 2008: The Dark Side of Linus Pauling.]
          John Ware, PT
          Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists
          "Nothing can bring a man peace but the triumph of principles." -R.W. Emerson
          “If names be not correct, language is not in accordance with the truth of things. If language be not in accordance with the truth of things, affairs cannot
          be carried on to success.” -The Analects of Confucius, Book 13, Verse 3

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          • #95
            Agree `100% with you John ---look at the 4th paragraph in the communication section first/second page on the v recent and excellent download just posted ...'the emotive impact of emotional words'...........
            I wouldn't get into arguments / discussions with people like Chaitow as I believe they are largely unchangeable due to a huge investment in terms of time money and reputation vested in peripheralist largely mechanistic explanations (for often benign pain states made much more complex than they need to be) .... I have always thought the cart is before the horse .......
            We need to understand a little about neurophysiology and common issues to do with the effects of degenerative, largely inevitable changes which will occur to sometimes compromise its function (see latest louis gifford blog post on this ) .In our modern lives we need to understand a lot about threat/stress physiology/ ischeamia and how education and very simple approaches are often best ... I believe we need to value a lot less the very complex 'manual skills' and peripheral explanations as they seem to me at least overly complex, take too long to repeat for often very little gain (given the numbers with c pain and the numbers where these approaches have made no difference to ).

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            • #96
              Hi Lechier!
              Please introduce yourself in the welcome forum.
              Carol Lynn Chevrier LMT
              " The truth is, people may see things differently. But they don't really want to. '' Don Draper.

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