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Preventative practices for my employees

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  • Preventative practices for my employees

    I own a head lice removal service and I don't want my employees to get hurt. The work requires gripping a lice comb, pulling toward them and down, bending over at the waist, and standing for usually 2-4 hours at a time with minimal rest and sometimes multiple sessions a day.

    I've had success coming to you all in the past for guidance for my own ailments after getting mixed-results from random PTs, so I thought I'd try again because .

    How can I help them avoid injury? I'm open to any suggestions.

  • #2
    I haven't come across this occupation previously, so have just done a quick search and found that there are now clinics in the UK based on the services available in the USA. It might be worth making contact with your local hairdressing schools and pet grooming services to find out how they address this issue in their students / trainees. Adjustable height chairs for the clients might help avoid back and neck strain. Your above description of the working conditions suggests that newcomers to this type of work are at risk of occupational injury unless they have an induction period.

    Repetitive strain injury

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica..._strain_injury

    Pain in the forearm is relatively common in the community. In the workplace forearm pain is associated with work involving frequent repetition, high forces, and prolonged abnormal postures. Nevertheless, other factors are involved in the presentation and the continuation of the pain. Notable among these factors are psychosocial issues and the workplace environment-the attitude to workers and their welfare, the physical conditions, and design of the job. Primary prevention may be effective but active surveillance is important with early intervention and an active management approach.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

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    • #3
      I've looked for chairs before and haven't had much luck finding something that has all the features necessary to do the service (adjustable height, fits children and adults, doesn't swivel, close to floor, low backrest) and is lightweight enough to carry easily since it's a mobile/in-home service. I'll keep looking though.

      My partner, who does the removal, told me it's always her back that fatigues first and never her arms, so maybe strengthening, massage, or something like that would help.

      Thanks for the ideas. I'll see what I can find out from hairdressers et al.

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      • #4
        Massage is nice, but strengthening is key.
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment

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