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More than a feeling: Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is characterized by reliable changes in affect and physiology

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  • CT More than a feeling: Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is characterized by reliable changes in affect and physiology

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0621101334.htm Abstract

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) describes the experience of tingling sensations in the crown of the head, in response to a range of audio-visual triggers such as whispering, tapping, and hand movements. Public interest in ASMR has risen dramatically and ASMR experiencers watch ASMR videos to promote relaxation and sleep. Unlike ostensibly similar emotional experiences such as “aesthetic chills” from music and awe-inspiring scenarios, the psychological basis of ASMR has not yet been established. We present two studies (one large-scale online experiment; one laboratory study) that test the emotional and physiological correlates of the ASMR response. Both studies showed that watching ASMR videos increased pleasant affect only in people who experienced ASMR. Study 2 showed that ASMR was associated with reduced heart rate and increased skin conductance levels. Findings indicate that ASMR is a reliable and physiologically-rooted experience that may have therapeutic benefits for mental and physical health.
    There are YouTube videos on this. Scratching, whispering, clicking sounds can induce it, as can touch. I have thought for some years now that manual therapy addicts are looking for sensation and have been reluctant to provide it. Many of my patients now go to other manual therapists for the feel good factor. The reason I don't want to provide it myself, is that I am not convinced that it moves them on, it can become a trap. I still use my hands to cue relaxation, but only to prove to patients that it is possible, I don't let them lie there for half an hour as though they were in the bath tub, I don't think that is what we are for. Others may disagree. I would like to read counter arguments, if there are any out there.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

  • #2
    Jo, those videos make me twitch (tho my daughter finds them relaxing). I'd rather just plug my vagus nerve stimulator into my ear and downregulate my brainstem from the inside out. There's bliss for ya.

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    • #3
      Hi Cathy,

      The videos make me feel cognitively uncomfortable, because they work on me and I can so easily see why people like them. I find that some of the osteopathic head holding techniques put people into a very relaxed state, although this is often preceeded by chills and tingling starting in the head and neck and spreading through the body. It is a useful tool to get people engaged so long as they are prepared to move and load afterwards. The problem is that some people would prefer to stay where they are and continue believing that they need to carry on "having treatment" rather than getting on with getting themselves fit for purpose.
      Last edited by Jo Bowyer; 23-06-2018, 03:28 PM.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

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