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  • #61
    Wes,

    What is 'clerkship'??? Sounds extraordinary.

    Nari

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    • #62
      Hi Nari,

      Clerkship refers to an arrangement that the University had with a few local clinics. During our didactic component, we had the opportunity to go in smaller groups and do a combination of observing and a fair amount of lower-level interventions in order to get more familiar with patients, clinics, clinicians, etc. When not in the clinic, we spent time in the classroom taking in lessons on clinic etiquette and the sort. We also spent some time taking about APTA-related issues.

      Hope that helps.

      Wes

      Comment


      • #63
        Thanks for the explanation, Wes. A similar thing exists here, but not under that name - just 'placement'.

        Nari

        Comment


        • #64
          Thanks Diane for knoweledge regarding chiros .

          To be honest , the title "Doctor" causes problems for many health professionals acrossing the world , the problems are varying from culture to another ..In most 3rd world areas the situation is boring because of litereacy level and culture is more restricting ,however currently Physicians are losing The title respect because of many reasons one of them The Physician income in relation to other basic workers in societies .

          I do not know what is the situation in USA ,however i can remember very well in one of the movies A psychologist in the movie and another person called her A doctor ..replied another one they are not real doctors ...

          cheers
          Emad
          :rose:

          Comment


          • #65
            I think there are other reasons the term "Doctor" is losing some of the respect it once had. I remember when I was young there was a big debate among physicians about the ethics of advertising. The consensus was you should have your name in the white pages of the phone directory, then they said placing your name in the yellow pages was acceptable, but it should be a simple placement. That was the state of the argument then, today on the radio, I would guess the number one advertisers on the air are physicians, pushing their wares including all types of surgery. They are ridiculous. They are selling arthroscopy like it was ice cream.

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            • #66
              Randy

              That is astounding.
              The rules that applied 'when you were young' still rigidly apply here. Nobody can peddle their wares publicly, and if they do, there are some severe retributions. Deregistration follows if they continue to self-promote on air or on paper. The chiros are bound by the same rules with their association.

              Physios can place large prominent ads in the yellow pages, but can say nothing other than who works with them and the specialties they like to practise.

              What is happening in the US?

              Nari

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by Nari
                What is happening in the US?
                hmmm... Sold?!
                Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. L VINCI
                We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. I NEWTON

                Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not a bit simpler.
                If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
                bernard

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                • #68
                  It would seem so, generally speaking.

                  Nari

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Hi Jason
                    I'm on a panel at a seminar and a chiro is giving a lecture on "The role of spinal manipulation in chronic pain management"
                    Any suggestions for questions that I can ask?
                    Mariette

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Mariette,
                      I posted a link to a radio interview of a chiropractor, David Seaman, earlier in the thread - here it is again: Interview link.
                      It's about 15 minutes long. It might give you some ideas.
                      Diane
                      www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                      SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                      HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                      Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                      @PainPhysiosCan
                      WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                      @WCPTPTPN
                      Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                      @dfjpt
                      SomaSimple on Facebook
                      @somasimple

                      "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                      “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                      “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                      "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                      "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Hi Mariette.
                        Sure. Ask if there's any evidence from clinical trials showing manipulation to be of benefit in the chronic population. There are proven benefits for exercise interventions, you could also state.

                        This blog discussion should help you frame your questions also:
                        http://blog.myphysicaltherapyspace.c...opractic_.html

                        Best,
                        Jason
                        Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
                        Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
                        Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

                        Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


                        The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Mariette,

                          A quick look at the Cochrane Reiviews is more supportive of massage therapy than of manipulation for subacute and chronic low back pain.

                          Jason,

                          Very interesting blog discussion regarding DC's and DPT's. As a DC who went on to do a fellowship to learn more PT and rehab, I could have become a PT and done a fellowship in ortho/manual therapy and arrive at the same place I am now for 1/3 of the cost. damn!

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Luca-
                            I'm glad you enjoyed it. It will be interesting to see what the future brings for our professions.
                            The funny thing about manipulation, as Jon Newman has correctly stated, that the more rigorously it is studied the fewer number of people and situations it seems to apply to, and the more generalized the effects.
                            I'm one of the few people here at Soma who use it regularly, but like most manipulative practitioners I began to see the limitations of it's usefulness and began to look elsewhere.
                            Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
                            Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
                            Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

                            Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


                            The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Diane,

                              Great link to the interview; thanks for sharing. Do you, or anyone out there, know of the 2002 study he referenced about MRI before and after manip? I tried to do a search, but haven't had the greatest success. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

                              Thanks,
                              Wes

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Wes,

                                I think this might be what your looking for:

                                The effects of side posture positioning and spinal adjusting on the lumbar Z joints: a randomized controlled trial with sixty-four subjects. Cramer GD. Spine, 2002 Nov. 15 Vol. 27 (22), pp 2459-66.

                                Sorry no link, had a hard copy of it in a binder.

                                Comment

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