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The Useless Core Strengthening

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  • bernard
    started a topic The Useless Core Strengthening

    The Useless Core Strengthening

    Hi All,

    The core strengthning seems to be a huge part of daily practice of many PTs.
    Here is two papers showing another point of view:

    Electromyographic functional analysis of the lumbar spinal muscles

    It is certainly possible to show evidently that the protocol of CS is not really good and perhaps brings more problems than it helps?

  • gerry the neck
    replied
    Is there need for abdominalogical therapists to counter the side effects of visable abs?

    My 'inner abs' are working fine, thank you ! I just like to disguise the 'inner moron' with a bit of intelligent looking flab. But it's ok, now I know the ladies don't seem to mind.
    Last edited by gerry the neck; 18-02-2014, 03:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • marcel
    replied
    Originally posted by Jo Bowyer View Post
    People with low enough body fat to display a six-pack sometimes have the most appalling dog breath if they have been dieting.

    If ever I decide to release my inner cougar, I think I'll target a chap with a smigeon of winter coat over his abs.
    Is there need for abdominalogical therapists to counter the side effects of visable abs?

    Leave a comment:


  • Diane
    replied
    Originally posted by Jo Bowyer View Post
    People with low enough body fat to display a six-pack sometimes have the most appalling dog breath if they have been dieting.

    If ever I decide to release my inner cougar, I think I'll target a chap with a smigeon of winter coat over his abs.

    :clap2:

    Leave a comment:


  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    People with low enough body fat to display a six-pack sometimes have the most appalling dog breath if they have been dieting.

    If ever I decide to release my inner cougar, I think I'll target a chap with a smigeon of winter coat over his abs.

    Leave a comment:


  • ian s
    replied
    at last some useful research …

    http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/s...-2013022060452

    Leave a comment:


  • Nomadic
    replied
    Originally posted by samyoung View Post
    Hey so I'm new here and haven't had time to read through the whole thread (currently in PT school) but I wanted to post this article and see what everyone thought.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17468378
    My student has to do an inservice next week on adhesive capsulitis and I made a point with one of the articles she had. There was a very bold statement made in the article that sounded very interesting and was referenced.....to an article from 1983. Then there was another bold statement made about the shoulder with a reference to an article....about a knee. Without reading this I thing it will likely be another one of these experiences. Lots of bold statements that are a little too amazing. Again another post hoc fallacy. I am beginning to notice a trend in the explanation of clinical reasoning. People are lazy and want the answer to be something simple. Fact is it is not. But therapists continue to perform verbal backflips scraping together a sentence of mechanical delight that sounds so good....until you realize it is actually terrible. I'll try to take a better look at the article, sounds interesting especially given a recent clinical commentary I read that mentioned core strength with relation to injury prevention.

    Leave a comment:


  • samyoung
    replied
    Hey so I'm new here and haven't had time to read through the whole thread (currently in PT school) but I wanted to post this article and see what everyone thought.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17468378

    Leave a comment:


  • Matthew Danziger
    replied
    As of today I've added Nick Tumminello's "CORE TRAINING: Facts, Fallacies & Top Techniques" to my list of things I'd like to get. I've only seen a few clips, but when I hear the things he says, it gives me hope that some people out there are really listening. With the amount of nonsense we all encounter daily, I think it's even more important to share the good stuff that cuts through.

    [yt]KkmdmMo4NuY[/yt]

    [yt]k9sBizTJObI[/yt]

    Leave a comment:


  • amacs
    replied
    Not sure if this has come up before. Peter O'Sullivan references it in his deconstruction of core and forms part of his current argument that teaching any form of bracing in chronic pain states (ignoring conditions such as spondylolisthesis) can be very detrimental.

    regards

    ANdy

    p.s. takes a few moments to load wherever the server is.
    Last edited by amacs; 26-04-2013, 09:55 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MaxG
    replied
    Originally posted by smith View Post
    McGill was misled by choosing to study cadavers. Well surprise if you work cadavers with lots of trunk flexion the spine breaks down. According to NSCA researchers, trunk flexion exercise is good for the spine. Within limits of course.
    This... so much...
    Some people act as if the SAID principle only goes for performance.

    Leave a comment:


  • jrob450
    replied
    McGill has a specific way to do "crunches". I don't buy it. Look at Hershel Walker. I think he does like 1000 sit ups per day without pain. Maybe he has a tolerance to flexion just like some people have a salt tolerance:teeth:

    Leave a comment:


  • zimney3pt
    replied
    Originally posted by smith View Post
    McGill was misled by choosing to study cadavers. Well surprise if you work cadavers with lots of trunk flexion the spine breaks down. According to NSCA researchers, trunk flexion exercise is good for the spine. Within limits of course.
    Yes, living tissue can repair itself, dead tissue will not. There is a difference between the two (cadavers and live subjects).

    Leave a comment:


  • smith
    replied
    McGill was misled by choosing to study cadavers. Well surprise if you work cadavers with lots of trunk flexion the spine breaks down. According to NSCA researchers, trunk flexion exercise is good for the spine. Within limits of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frédéric
    replied
    This really fits in this thread.

    Leave a comment:

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