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The Useless Core Strengthening

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  • We have PE teachers who tell kids that they would experience fewer incidents of falling were they to properly train their core. I guess Karl Wallenda might never have fallen in Puerto Rico had he known in 1978 about the importance of core stengthening.

    Mel Siff always had a lot to say on this topic.

    Comment


    • Some wood for the fire here
      Frédéric Wellens, pht
      «We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the tone of voice in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.»
      «
      Those who cannot understand how to put their thoughts on ice should not enter into the heat of debate.
      »
      Friedrich Nietzsche
      www.physioaxis.ca
      chroniquesdedouleur blog

      Comment


      • Is Your Ab Workout Hurting Your Back?

        From today.
        "The genesis of much of the ab work we do these days probably lies in the work done in an Australian physiotherapy lab during the mid-1990s. Researchers there, hoping to elucidate the underlying cause of back pain, attached electrodes to people’s midsections and directed them to rapidly raise and lower their arms, like the alarmist robot in “Lost in Space.”

        In those with healthy backs, the scientists found, a deep abdominal muscle tensed several milliseconds before the arms rose. The brain apparently alerted the muscle, the transversus abdominis, to brace the spine in advance of movement. In those with back pain, however, the transversus abdominis didn’t fire early. The spine wasn’t ready for the flailing. It wobbled and ached. Perhaps, the researchers theorized, increasing abdominal strength could ease back pain. The lab worked with patients in pain to isolate and strengthen that particular deep muscle, in part by sucking in their guts during exercises. The results, though mixed, showed some promise against sore backs.

        From that highly technical foray into rehabilitative medicine, a booming industry of fitness classes was born."
        Thus began the Church of the Transversus Abdominis.

        :mg::cry::vomit::embarasse:thumbs_do
        Last edited by Diane; 24-02-2011, 05:45 PM.
        Diane
        www.dermoneuromodulation.com
        SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
        HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
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        Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
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        @dfjpt
        SomaSimple on Facebook
        @somasimple

        "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

        “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

        “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

        "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

        "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

        Comment


        • Originally posted by AdamB
          From the article, Stuart McGill, a highly regarded professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo in Canada:


          OMFG! :vomit:

          He seems to be the current darling of the chiros and quite likely, orthos.
          Diane
          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
          @PainPhysiosCan
          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
          @WCPTPTPN
          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

          @dfjpt
          SomaSimple on Facebook
          @somasimple

          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

          Comment


          • When you think about it it's quite amazing how much nocebo you can induce just by explaining biomechanics...
            ________________
            Last edited by Diane; 01-03-2011, 04:19 AM. Reason: link removed

            Comment


            • This really fits in this thread.
              Frédéric Wellens, pht
              «We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the tone of voice in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.»
              «
              Those who cannot understand how to put their thoughts on ice should not enter into the heat of debate.
              »
              Friedrich Nietzsche
              www.physioaxis.ca
              chroniquesdedouleur blog

              Comment


              • McGill was misled by choosing to study cadavers. Well surprise if you work cadavers with lots of trunk flexion the spine breaks down. According to NSCA researchers, trunk flexion exercise is good for the spine. Within limits of course.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by smith View Post
                  McGill was misled by choosing to study cadavers. Well surprise if you work cadavers with lots of trunk flexion the spine breaks down. According to NSCA researchers, trunk flexion exercise is good for the spine. Within limits of course.
                  Yes, living tissue can repair itself, dead tissue will not. There is a difference between the two (cadavers and live subjects).
                  Kory Zimney, PT, DPT

                  http://koryzimney.blogspot.com

                  "Study principles not methods, a mind that can grasp principles will create its own methods." - Gill

                  "All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them." - Galileo Galilei

                  Comment


                  • McGill has a specific way to do "crunches". I don't buy it. Look at Hershel Walker. I think he does like 1000 sit ups per day without pain. Maybe he has a tolerance to flexion just like some people have a salt tolerance:teeth:

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by smith View Post
                      McGill was misled by choosing to study cadavers. Well surprise if you work cadavers with lots of trunk flexion the spine breaks down. According to NSCA researchers, trunk flexion exercise is good for the spine. Within limits of course.
                      This... so much...
                      Some people act as if the SAID principle only goes for performance.

                      Comment


                      • Not sure if this has come up before. Peter O'Sullivan references it in his deconstruction of core and forms part of his current argument that teaching any form of bracing in chronic pain states (ignoring conditions such as spondylolisthesis) can be very detrimental.

                        regards

                        ANdy

                        p.s. takes a few moments to load wherever the server is.
                        Last edited by amacs; 26-04-2013, 09:55 PM.
                        "Here is Edward Bear coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump, on the back of his head behind Christopher Robin. It is, as far as he knows, the only way of coming downstairs, but sometimes he feels that there is another way, if only he could stop bumping for a moment and think of it." A.A. Milne

                        Comment


                        • As of today I've added Nick Tumminello's "CORE TRAINING: Facts, Fallacies & Top Techniques" to my list of things I'd like to get. I've only seen a few clips, but when I hear the things he says, it gives me hope that some people out there are really listening. With the amount of nonsense we all encounter daily, I think it's even more important to share the good stuff that cuts through.

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                          [yt]k9sBizTJObI[/yt]

                          Comment


                          • Hey so I'm new here and haven't had time to read through the whole thread (currently in PT school) but I wanted to post this article and see what everyone thought.

                            http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17468378

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by samyoung View Post
                              Hey so I'm new here and haven't had time to read through the whole thread (currently in PT school) but I wanted to post this article and see what everyone thought.

                              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17468378
                              My student has to do an inservice next week on adhesive capsulitis and I made a point with one of the articles she had. There was a very bold statement made in the article that sounded very interesting and was referenced.....to an article from 1983. Then there was another bold statement made about the shoulder with a reference to an article....about a knee. Without reading this I thing it will likely be another one of these experiences. Lots of bold statements that are a little too amazing. Again another post hoc fallacy. I am beginning to notice a trend in the explanation of clinical reasoning. People are lazy and want the answer to be something simple. Fact is it is not. But therapists continue to perform verbal backflips scraping together a sentence of mechanical delight that sounds so good....until you realize it is actually terrible. I'll try to take a better look at the article, sounds interesting especially given a recent clinical commentary I read that mentioned core strength with relation to injury prevention.
                              Michael Heinrich DPT.

                              My opinions and statements on this site are not a reflection of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the Federal government.

                              Comment


                              • at last some useful research …

                                http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/s...-2013022060452

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