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Premotor Symptoms as Predictors of Outcome in Parkinsons Disease: A Case-Control Study

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The seeds of parkinson's disease: Amyloid fibrils that move through brain

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0903101457.htm

    The researchers suggest that Parkinson's disease is a systemic (whole-body) amyloidosis rather than one that is localized to one part of the brain. This fits with the non-motor symptoms that patients experience before the onset of motor dysfunction and the multiple organ involvement of α-syn pathology. The findings from this work are highly applicable to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.​​​​​​​

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Parkinson's disease may originate in the intestines

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0903105221.htm

    "Parkinson's is a complex disease that we're still trying to understand. However, with this study and a similar study in the USA that has recently arrived at the same result using mice, the suspicion that the disease begins in the gut of some patients has gained considerable support."

    The research project at Aarhus University also showed that the harmful alpha-synuclein not only travel from the intestines to the brain, but also to the heart.

    "For many years, we have known that Parkinson patients have extensive damage to the nervous system of the heart, and that the damage occurs early on. We've just never been able to understand why. The present study shows that the heart is damaged very fast, even though the pathology started in the intestine, and we can continue to build on this knowledge in our coming research," says Per Borghammer.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Caloric vestibular stimulation for the management of motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    https://www.prd-journal.com/article/...252-4/fulltext

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0626124941.htm

    An international team of researchers challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson's disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain's neurons, characteristic of Parkinson's disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Transneuronal Propagation of Pathologic α-Synuclein from the Gut to the Brain Models Parkinson’s Disease

    https://www.cell.com/neuron/fulltext...T+Newsletters=


    The Braak hypothesis posits that α-syn pathology can spread in a stereotyped fashion from the gastrointestinal tract via the vagus nerve to the ventral midbrain, where it selectively kills dopamine (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc).

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The burden of care and the understanding of disease in Parkinson’s disease

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0217581

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease causing the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which chronically progresses [1]. Early PD patients undergoing medical treatment do not have significant difficulty in daily living, but patients with advanced PD experience difficulties in basic daily living activities due to various motor and non-motor symptoms, and the disability in daily living continually increases with progression of the disease [1,2]. Specific motor symptoms of PD, including bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity, and gait disturbance, are readily apparent to patients and caregivers, but their interests in and recognition of non-motor symptoms, including gastrointestinal symptoms, cognitive/emotional disorder, autonomic disturbance, and pain are lower [3]. In particular, the non-motor symptoms of PD have been identified as factors that increase burden of care and lower the quality of life more than the motor symptoms [4,5]. This finding has also been confirmed by a report showing that the non-motor symptoms may be the key factors that reduce the quality of life, even in early stages of the disease [6]. Therefore, proper understanding and recognition of the disease by PD patients and caregivers may be improved by providing more knowledge about the disease itself, and lack of understanding of the disease may have a negative effect on the care of PD patients [7,8].

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease: A systematic review on the psychometric properties of the existing measures

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0217700

    A significant percentage of patients suffering from Parkinson’s Disease (PD) experience Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs), contributing to reduced quality of life. As they can be managed by reducing the dopamine dosage, the detection of their presence is crucial for PD treatment plan. Nevertheless, they tend to be under-recognized in clinical practice, since routine screening is not common–despite existing instruments that may support clinicians. This work presents a systematic review on the psychometric properties of instruments measuring ICDs in PD, to test whether clinicians dispose of valid tools that may help them in clinical assessment.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Voluntary and spontaneous facial mimicry toward other’s emotional expression in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0214957

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Virtual reality offers benefits for Parkinson's disease patients

    Training in virtual environment helps patients improve balance and avoid obstacles while walking

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0409162815.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Exercise can improve non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0304105418.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    New treatment offers potentially promising results for the possibility of slowing, stopping, or even reversing Parkinson's disease

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0227081531.htm

    A pioneering clinical trials program that delivered an experimental treatment directly to the brain offers hope that it may be possible to restore the cells damaged in Parkinson's disease. The study investigated whether boosting the levels of a naturally-occurring growth factor, Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), can regenerate dying dopamine brain cells in patients with Parkinson's and reverse their condition, something no existing treatment can do. Potentially promising results of the third arm of the trials, an open-label extension study, are reported in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Altered brain activity patterns of Parkinson's captured in mice

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0219132911.htm

    Parkinson's disrupts the basal ganglia, a set of nuclei that relays information from the wrinkled cortex to brain areas important for movement control. A nucleus known as the striatum acts as the primary input hub for the entire structure. Marked by a steep decline in the chemical messenger dopamine and cells that make it, Parkinson's robs the basal ganglia of the tools it needs to function properly and pushes the striatum into pathological hyperactivity.

    "When you take dopamine away, the cells reorganize, and that reorganization leads to most of the symptoms of Parkinson's," said Prof. Gordon Arbuthnott, senior author of the study and principal investigator of the OIST Brain Mechanism for Behaviour Unit. The research, published online on January 30, 2019 by the European Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that the striatal neurons' normal pattern of activity warps when the cells are starved of dopamine. The pattern becomes dominated by one particular subset of cells, often firing in sync.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Can We Repair the Brain? Using Stem Cells to Treat Parkinson’s

    https://neurosciencenews.com/parkins...m-cells-10750/

    The most common PD treatment today is based on enhancing the activity of the nigro-striatal pathway in the brain with dopamine-modulating therapies, thereby increasing striatal dopamine levels and improving motor impairment associated with the disease. However, this treatment has significant long-term limitations and side effects. Stem cell technologies show promise for treating PD and may play an increasing role in alleviating at least the motor symptoms, if not others, in the decades to come.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The involvement of the gut in Parkinson's disease: hype or hope?

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0207115006.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Phase-Dependent Suppression of Beta Oscillations in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    http://www.jneurosci.org/content/39/6/1119.full

    Synchronized oscillations within and between brain areas facilitate normal processing, but are often amplified in disease. A prominent example is the abnormally sustained beta-frequency (∼20 Hz) oscillations recorded from the cortex and subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients.
    Obviously early days, but an interesting approach.

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