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  • Jo Bowyer
    started a topic CT Occupational Health

    Occupational Health

    Prevalence and its risk factors for low back pain among operation and maintenance personnel in wind farms

    http://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomed...891-016-1180-y

    Abstract

    Background
    With the increasingly severe energy shortage and climate change problems, developing wind power has become a key energy development strategy and an inevitable choice to protect the ecological environment worldwide. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) and analyze its risk factors among operation and maintenance personnel in wind farms (OMPWF).

    Methods
    A cross-sectional survey of 151 OMPWF was performed, and a comprehensive questionnaire, which was modified and combined from Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaires (NMQ), Washington State Ergonomics Tool (WSET) and Syndrome Checklist-90(SCL-90) was used to assess the prevalence and risk factors of LBP among OMPWF.

    Results
    The prevalence of LBP was 88.74 % (134/151) among OMPWF. The multivariable model highlighted four related factors: backrest, somatization, squatting and lifting objects weighing more than 10 lb more than twice per minute.

    Conclusions
    The prevalence of LBP among OMPWF appears to be high and highlights a major occupational health concern.
    Keywords

    Wind farms Low back pain Risk factors Ergonomic




    Hand-arm vibration and the risk of vascular and neurological diseases—A systematic review and meta-analysis

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0180795

    Abstract

    Background

    Increased occurrence of Raynaud’s phenomenon, neurosensory injury and carpal tunnel syndrome has been reported for more than 100 years in association with work with vibrating machines. The current risk prediction modelling (ISO-5349) for “Raynaud’s phenomenon” is based on a few studies published 70 to 40 years ago. There are no corresponding risk prediction models for neurosensory injury or carpal tunnel syndrome, nor any systematic reviews comprising a statistical synthesis (meta-analysis) of the evidence.

    Objectives

    Our aim was to provide a systematic review of the literature on the association between Raynaud’s phenomenon, neurosensory injuries and carpal tunnel syndrome and hand-arm vibration (HAV) exposure. Moreover the aim was to estimate the magnitude of such an association using meta-analysis.

    Methods

    This systematic review covers the scientific literature up to January 2016. The databases used for the literature search were PubMed and Science Direct. We found a total of 4,335 abstracts, which were read and whose validity was assessed according to pre-established criteria. 294 articles were examined in their entirety to determine whether each article met the inclusion criteria. The possible risk of bias was assessed for each article. 52 articles finally met the pre-established criteria for inclusion in the systematic review.

    Results

    The results show that workers who are exposed to HAV have an increased risk of vascular and neurological diseases compared to non-vibration exposed groups. The crude estimate of the risk increase is approximately 4–5 fold. The estimated effect size (odds ratio) is 6.9 for the studies of Raynaud’s phenomenon when including only the studies judged to have a low risk of bias. The corresponding risk of neurosensory injury is 7.4 and the equivalent of carpal tunnel syndrome is 2.9.

    Conclusion

    At equal exposures, neurosensory injury occurs with a 3-time factor shorter latency than Raynaud’s phenomenon. Which is why preventive measures should address this vibration health hazard with greater attention.
    Update 14/07/2017
    Last edited by Jo Bowyer; 14-07-2017, 11:31 AM.

  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Is acting hazardous? On the risks of immersing oneself in a role

    https://aeon.co/ideas/is-acting-haza...0c379-69418129

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Cross-sectional area of the paraspinal muscles and its association with muscle strength among fighter pilots: a 5-year follow-up

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2551-y


    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the possible changes in CSA and composition of the psoas and paraspinal muscles in the 5-year follow up among the FINAF fighter pilots during their early flight career and, thus to determine whether muscle CSA and composition could have a predictive role for LBP. In addition, the secondary aim was to examine a possible relationship between the overall isometric strength test results and muscle CSA at the baseline. Prevention of pilots’ LBP induced flight duty limitations has enormous operational and economic importance, in addition to protecting pilots’ health. Early identification of pilots susceptible to severe LBP would allow directing the preventive interventions to the risk group. Measurement of low back mobility and muscular function has not been very successful in predicting LBP in (fighter) pilots. Therefore, new methods are needed for this purpose, like the MRI measurement of lumbar paraspinal muscle composition and CSA used in the present study.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The importance of return to work: How to achieve optimal reintegration in ACS patients

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10....47487319839263

    The vocational reintegration of patients after an acute coronary syndrome is a crucial step towards complete convalescence from the social as well as the individual point of view. Return to work rates are determined by medical parameters such as left ventricular function, residual ischaemia and heart rhythm stability, as well as by occupational requirement profile such as blue or white collar work, night shifts and the ability to commute (which is, in part, determined by physical fitness). Psychosocial factors including depression, self-perceived health situation and pre-existing cognitive impairment determine the reintegration rate to a significant extent. Patients at risk of poor vocational outcomes should be identified in the early period of rehabilitation to avoid a reintegration failure and to prevent socio-professional exclusion with adverse psychological and financial consequences. A comprehensive healthcare pathway of acute coronary syndrome patients is initiated by cardiac rehabilitation, which includes specific algorithms and assessment tools for risk stratification and occupational restitution. As the first in its kind, this review addresses determinants and legal aspects of reintegration of patients experiencing an acute coronary syndrome, and offers practical advice on reintegration strategies particularly for vulnerable patients. It presents different approaches and scientific findings in the European countries and serves as a recommendation for action.


    This is a subject close to my heart, I have been involved in coronary rehab since the late 1970s. These patients have much greater reported QoL than those who become invalids, OK some will become ill again and some will die, but at least they have continued to be themselves for the longest possible time.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Female astronauts: How performance products like space suits and bras are designed to pave the way for women’s accomplishments

    https://theconversation.com/female-a...ccomplishments

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    British army: should 16-year-olds be able to enlist? Academic experts debate

    https://theconversation.com/british-...perts%20debate

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Regular physical exercise before entering military service may protect young adult men from fatigue fractures

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2513-4

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Could long-term overhead load in painters be associated with rotator cuff lesions? A pilot study

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0213824

    Long-term occupational load on the shoulders in painters seems to be associated with an increased risk for developing RCT. Our findings may provide support for developing preventive strategies for this unique cohort.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    What using animals for scientific research taught me about myself

    https://www.statnews.com/2019/03/11/...874e-151138121

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Hypermobility of joints in dancers

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0212188

    Researchers, who devoted their academic careers to the problem of excessive flexibility in dancers, have always faced a puzzling question: is hypermobility genetically determined or is it simply the result of the strenuous training routines that dancers undergo since childhood? Unfortunately, this question still remains unanswered [4]. Furthermore, there are conflicting opinions in the literature on whether excessive flexibility in dancers is a benefit or a problem. Some researchers have reported evidence of a correlation between joint hypermobility and increased risk of injury, identifying JHS as the underlying cause of impaired coordination and poor physical performance, chronic fatigue, and mental strain [6, 7]. Other authors have suggested that the JHS often found in dancers is an asset more than a liability [8] with excessive joint laxity in children often perceived by dance schools as a marker of future success in professional dancing.

    However, the struggles with training intensity and peer pressure that some young dancers have to face frequently prove to be too arduous for them to handle. A prolonged adaptation period and low body awareness during their initial training may lead to musculoskeletal damage [9].

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The high prevalence of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) and its associated factors in amateur musicians playing in student orchestras: A cross-sectional study

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0191772

    The reported prevalences of PRMDs in amateur musicians vary greatly, depending on the study design and the population studied. Prevalences of up to 80% have been reported among amateur musicians.[812] These numbers seem to outline the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints in the open population, for example in the Netherlands a year prevalence of 53.4% is reported in a survey in the open population.[13] However, no study directly comparing prevalences has been performed to our knowledge.[2,14,15] Female gender has been associated with a higher prevalence of PRMDs among amateur musicians.[2,11,12] Playing load is another confirmed risk factor among amateur musicians.[8,9,11] A recent cohort study reported a nearly threefold increase in prevalence following a sudden increase in playing time.[8]

    However, literature studying the health of the amateur musician is scarce.[8] Several associated factors for PRMDs in professional musicians have not yet been studied in amateur musicians. Among these factors are instrument type, tobacco and alcohol consumption, exercise, playing experience and warming up, and perceived physical burden.[1,16,17] Also several biomechanical factors possibly influence the occurrence of PRMDs in musicians; asymmetric static playing posture, weight of the instrument and elevation of the arms possibly play a role in the development and maintenance of PRMDs.[14,16,18] Each instrument thereby has its own potential risk factors due to differences in playing technique.[19] Within the general population, additional to the music-specific risk factors, other determinants such as age, comorbidity and physical demands were found to be risk factors for musculoskeletal complaints.[20]

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    A longitudinal investigation of the factors associated with increased RISk of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in MUsic students (RISMUS): a study protocol

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2440-4

    Student and professional musicians will play through pain, as a physiotherapist I don't have much say, I can support and advise them though.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Prevalence and potential risk factors of flight-related neck, shoulder and low back pain among helicopter pilots and crewmembers: a questionnaire-based study

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2421-7

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Overworked and isolated: the rising epidemic of loneliness in academia

    https://theconversation.com/overwork...0in%20academia

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Millennial burnout: building resilience is no answer – we need to overhaul how we work

    https://theconversation.com/millenni...ow%20we%20work

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