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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    If work dominated your every moment would life be worth living?

    https://aeon.co/ideas/if-work-domina...7749d-69418129


    Yes, so long as you are self employed

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    How gig economy gives a mental health boost to workers – new research

    https://theconversation.com/how-gig-...new%20research

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Neuromuscular exercise reduces low back pain intensity and improves physical functioning in nursing duties among female healthcare workers; secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2678-x

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Scientist and Parent: The bereaved parent

    https://elifesciences.org/articles/4...19-elife-alert

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Zero-hour contracts take a huge mental and physical toll – poor eating habits, lack of sleep and relationship problems

    https://theconversation.com/zero-hou...hip%20problems

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    We need to talk about suicide in the military

    https://theconversation.com/we-need-...the%20military

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Fishing among worst jobs for health

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0530122034.htm

    University of Exeter researchers studied census data and found 2.8% of fishermen and women reported "bad" or "very bad" health, and 10.3% said their activities were limited "a lot" or "a little" by long-term illness.

    When adjusted to take account of other factors like age, health outcomes among fishers were statistically only better than workers in two other industries -- coal mining and a small number of people who engage in "subsistence" activities.

    The researchers say their findings demonstrate the need for specific occupational health services to support UK fishing communities.

    "Poor health outcomes among fishers extend beyond the risk of fatal accidents," said Dr Rachel Turner, of the Environment and Sustainability Institute on the University of Exeter's Penryn Campus in Cornwall.

    "We found evidence of poorer general health and higher rates of illnesses or disabilities that can impede everyday life.


    ​​​​​​​

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    A hidden mismatch between experiences of young athletes with overuse injuries of the wrist and sports physicians’ perceptions: a focus group study

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2616-y

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    How ballerinas defy the corporeal in a quest for the ethereal

    https://aeon.co/ideas/how-ballerinas...0ad14-69418129

    Early on, Balanchine sought the help of the Italian shoemaker Salvatore Capezio to make what would be the first major revamp of pointe shoes. Early pointe shoes boxes were made of heavy layers of fabric and glue, with shanks of leather and cork. Dancers stuffed lambswool or cotton padding inside under the tips of their toes. Balanchine thought these shoes too hard and heavy. His style demanded a softer, sleeker shoe. So Capezio crafted one that harkened back to the lighter Romantic-era shoes, one that required dancers to be stronger in order to use them.

    These modern shoes, together with new technical demands, saw ballet dancers become true athletes: training for hours and hours a day, pushing and contorting their bodies to perform and perfect these predetermined shapes and movements codified in France hundreds of years earlier. For these performers, great effort is exerted to appear effortless.
    ​​​​​​​

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Risk for cervical herniated intervertebral disc in dentists: a nationwide population-based study

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2559-3

    Prolonged static postures (PSPs) are often unavoidable in daily dental operations [4, 6]. Forward-head postures which involve holding the neck and head in an unbalanced forward position to gain better visibility during treatment are common among dentists [4, 6]. Sustained contraction of the cervical muscles due to the PSPs may cause the weakening of spinal discs, which in turn increases the risk of disc degeneration of herniation [4].

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Is acting hazardous? On the risks of immersing oneself in a role

    https://aeon.co/ideas/is-acting-haza...0c379-69418129

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Cross-sectional area of the paraspinal muscles and its association with muscle strength among fighter pilots: a 5-year follow-up

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2551-y


    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the possible changes in CSA and composition of the psoas and paraspinal muscles in the 5-year follow up among the FINAF fighter pilots during their early flight career and, thus to determine whether muscle CSA and composition could have a predictive role for LBP. In addition, the secondary aim was to examine a possible relationship between the overall isometric strength test results and muscle CSA at the baseline. Prevention of pilots’ LBP induced flight duty limitations has enormous operational and economic importance, in addition to protecting pilots’ health. Early identification of pilots susceptible to severe LBP would allow directing the preventive interventions to the risk group. Measurement of low back mobility and muscular function has not been very successful in predicting LBP in (fighter) pilots. Therefore, new methods are needed for this purpose, like the MRI measurement of lumbar paraspinal muscle composition and CSA used in the present study.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The importance of return to work: How to achieve optimal reintegration in ACS patients

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10....47487319839263

    The vocational reintegration of patients after an acute coronary syndrome is a crucial step towards complete convalescence from the social as well as the individual point of view. Return to work rates are determined by medical parameters such as left ventricular function, residual ischaemia and heart rhythm stability, as well as by occupational requirement profile such as blue or white collar work, night shifts and the ability to commute (which is, in part, determined by physical fitness). Psychosocial factors including depression, self-perceived health situation and pre-existing cognitive impairment determine the reintegration rate to a significant extent. Patients at risk of poor vocational outcomes should be identified in the early period of rehabilitation to avoid a reintegration failure and to prevent socio-professional exclusion with adverse psychological and financial consequences. A comprehensive healthcare pathway of acute coronary syndrome patients is initiated by cardiac rehabilitation, which includes specific algorithms and assessment tools for risk stratification and occupational restitution. As the first in its kind, this review addresses determinants and legal aspects of reintegration of patients experiencing an acute coronary syndrome, and offers practical advice on reintegration strategies particularly for vulnerable patients. It presents different approaches and scientific findings in the European countries and serves as a recommendation for action.


    This is a subject close to my heart, I have been involved in coronary rehab since the late 1970s. These patients have much greater reported QoL than those who become invalids, OK some will become ill again and some will die, but at least they have continued to be themselves for the longest possible time.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Female astronauts: How performance products like space suits and bras are designed to pave the way for women’s accomplishments

    https://theconversation.com/female-a...ccomplishments

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    British army: should 16-year-olds be able to enlist? Academic experts debate

    https://theconversation.com/british-...perts%20debate

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