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  • Cremated remains reveal hints of who is buried at Stonehenge

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...=Editors_Picks
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • The debate over people’s pathway into the Americas heats up

      https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-newsletter-v2

      Despite recently getting a cold shoulder from some researchers, a long-standing idea that North America’s first settlers entered the continent via an ice-free inland corridor boasts more scientific support than any other proposal, an international team says.

      New World colonizers from Asia may also have traveled by canoe down the Northwest Pacific Coast and perhaps much farther, as critics of the ice-free corridor hypothesis have argued. But less evidence supports that possibility, archaeologist Ben Potter of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and colleagues argue in a research review published online August 8 in Science Advances.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • A brief history of mathematics: From Plato's philosophy of mathematics to modern mysteries

        http://www.thestargarden.co.uk/Histo...thematics.html

        In the 19th century, people begun to challenge Plato's argument, that mathematics contains true knowledge. In particular, it was not understood how Plato's abstract forms could interact with physical objects, since both obey different laws. Philosophers of science wanted to find another way to justify the certainty we have in mathematics, and many other schools of thought emerged, including intuitionism, formalism, and logicism[43a].

        Intuitionism argues that mathematical statements are mental constructions. Formalism states that numbers do not exist, except as symbols that are not about anything, and that mathematics is built from the manipulation of these symbols by following rules. Logicism states that the whole of mathematics can be derived from the philosophical laws of logic.
        While there is still no consensus on what numbers represent, most philosophers of mathematics agree that mathematics can be described as beautiful[47].
        Timeline of mathematics

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_mathematics
        Last edited by Jo Bowyer; 14-08-2018, 04:35 PM.
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • Ancestor of all life on Earth evolved earlier than we thought, according to our new timescale

          https://theconversation.com/ancestor...ew%20timescale
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • Meet the first known child of a Neandertal and a Denisovan

            https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-newsletter-v2
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


          • German skeletons hint that medieval warrior groups recruited from afar

            https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-newsletter-v2
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • Human evolution: secrets of early ancestors could be unlocked by African rainforests

              https://theconversation.com/human-ev...%20rainforests
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • What Anglo Saxon teeth can tell us about modern health

                https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0906123403.htm

                The skeletons analysed at the University of Bradford come from a settlement at Raunds Furnells and are from a group known to have been under nourished. The effect of this under nourishment, or stress, is to limit the growth of bones. This can limit the evidence available from analysis of bones alone, such as age.

                Researchers were also able to look at children of different ages to see whether those who survived the first 1,000 days from conception, during which factors such as height are set, had different biomarkers for stress than those who died during this high-risk period.

                Teeth, unlike bone, continue to grow under such stress and, unlike bone, record high nitrogen values. This evidence gives a clearer picture of what is happening to the child from before birth. The teeth are, in effect, acting as an archive of diet and health of both the child and mother.
                ​​​​​​​
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • The Universality of Shame

                  https://neurosciencenews.com/shame-universality-9841/

                  Shame on you. These three simple words can have devastating effect on an individual’s psyche.

                  But why is that? How is the feeling of shame generated, and what is its purpose? Some theorists argue that feeling shame is a pathology, a condition to be cured. Others dismiss it as a useless, ugly emotion.

                  A research team at the University of Montreal and UC Santa Barbara’s Center for Evolutionary Psychology (CEP), however, suggest something altogether different. Shame, they argue, was built into human nature by evolution because it served an important function for our foraging ancestors.

                  Living in small, highly interdependent bands, the researchers explain, our ancestors faced frequent life-threatening reversals, and they counted on their fellow band members to value them enough during bad times to pull them through. So being devalued by others — deemed unworthy of help — was literally a threat to their survival. Therefore, when considering how to act, it was critical to weigh the direct payoff of a potential action (e.g., how much will I benefit by stealing this food?) and against its social costs (e.g., how much will others devalue me if I steal the food — and how likely is it that they will find out?) became critical.
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • Butchered bird bones put humans in Madagascar 10,500 years ago

                    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-newsletter-v2

                    Humans made their mark on Madagascar around 6,000 years earlier than previously thought, scientists say. Those early migrants hunted massive, flightless birds once native to the island off southeast Africa, leaving butchery marks on the bird bones that enabled the new timeline.
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • The way hunter-gatherers share food shows how cooperation evolved

                      https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-newsletter-v2
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment


                      • Neanderthals were no brutes – research reveals they may have been precision workers

                        https://theconversation.com/neandert...sion%20workers
                        Jo Bowyer
                        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                        Comment


                        • Viruses influenced gene sharing between Neanderthals and humans

                          https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1004112547.htm
                          Jo Bowyer
                          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                          Comment


                          • Neanderthal healthcare practices crucial to survival

                            https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1004110042.htm

                            Neanderthals lived in small groups, so any one loss of life was particularly significant to the survival of the whole community. Injury, over disease, was the most common threat, as Neanderthals didn't live in the type of environment, or in large enough communities, to be at high risk from pathogens.

                            Neanderthal women, however, were at risk from difficulties in childbirth. The shape of their pelvis and the size and shape of a child's head was similar to that of modern-day humans, so it is assumed that they would also have encountered some common issues in childbirth.

                            Dr Spikins said: "It is likely that they would have had assisted childbirth; the role that we now attribute to midwives. Without support, they probably could not have survived the toll that the death rate of mothers and babies could have taken on their communities.

                            "When we look at the daily risks and dangers involved in hunting and finding food, as well as in childbirth in respect to their small hunting communities, it is not surprising that they would develop practices to improve health and reduce mortality risk.

                            "We can start to see healthcare as a pattern of evolutionary significant collaborative behaviour, alongside hunting together, food sharing and parenting. In this we can see why providing healthcare to those in need today is such an important part of human life."

                            Researchers now aim to expand this work to look at potential methods of healthcare and how far back healthcare practices can be traced.
                            Jo Bowyer
                            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                            Comment


                            • A 90,000-year-old bone knife hints special tools appeared early in Africa

                              https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...d-early-africa
                              Jo Bowyer
                              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                              Comment

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