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Neuroendocrine immune papers

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  • How herpesviruses shape the immune system

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0108101207.htm
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • Nutrition, the visceral immune system, and the evolutionary origins of pathogenic obesity

      https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2.../26/1809046116

      Obesity-associated illnesses (e.g., type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease), are especially common in: (i) adults with abdominal obesity, especially enlargement of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), a tissue with important immune functions; and (ii) individuals with poor fetal nutrition whose nutritional input increases later in life. I hypothesize that selection favored the evolution of increased lifelong investment in VAT in individuals likely to suffer lifelong malnutrition because of its importance in fighting intraabdominal infections. Then, when increased nutrition violates the adaptive fetal prediction of lifelong nutritional deficit, preferential VAT investment could contribute to abdominal obesity and chronic inflammatory disease.
      The devastating health consequences of obesity pose an evolutionary puzzle: What adaptive purpose could be served by a metabolic physiology so disastrous for so many? Clearly, pathogenic obesity is not selectively advantageous so it must arise from some advantageous process gone awry.
      In a nonobese individual, the greater omentum is a loosely hanging fold of the peritoneum that is moved within the peritoneal cavity by respiratory movements, intestinal peristalsis, and general body activity (13, 15). It adheres (through the rapid production of fibrin) to foreign bodies, wounds, and other sites of inflammation and infection, acting like a bandage laden with antibiotic and healing agents.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • Breaking the Rules of Science to Treat Cancer

        https://stories.abbvie.com/stories/b...d3de-151138121
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • Vaccines have health effects beyond protecting against target diseases

          https://theconversation.com/vaccines...get%20diseases

          A measles vaccine protects against measles infection. By introducing a bit of weakened virus, the immune system learns how to deal with it, so when a real measles virus comes along, it can eliminate it. But does the immune system learn more from the vaccine? Recent research suggests, rather intriguingly, that it does.
          It is time to change our perception of vaccines: vaccines are not merely a protective tool against a specific disease, they affect the immune system broadly. In the case of live vaccines, the immune system is strengthened. In contrast, non-live vaccines seem to have a negative effect on the immune system in females.

          The latter finding is an obvious cause for concern, particularly since it would be undesirable to stop using, say, the DTP vaccine, as it protects against three severe diseases. Fortunately, there is something to do. It appears that if a live vaccine is given after a non-live vaccine, the negative effect of the non-live vaccine may be mitigated. So there is an urgent need for studies testing different sequences of live and non-live vaccines.
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • Investigating why oak trees are dying is helping scientists understand how infectious diseases work

            https://theconversation.com/investig...iseases%20work

            This paper describes the pathobiome which has been a missing piece in my conceptual jigsaw when dealing with complex cases.
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • Chaos in the body tunes up your immune system

              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0116111039.htm
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • Anatomy of surprise: Scientists discover hidden blood networks that cross through bone

                https://www.statnews.com/2019/01/21/...1897-151138121

                “We have the bone marrow, which produces the blood cells, and when you need them, you need them urgently. But how do they get out?” said Svetlana Komarova, who studies bone biology at McGill University in Montreal.
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • drcph
                  drcph commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Jo this makes perfect sense from the biokinetic embryology model, where the vascular fields guide the osseous formation. Thank you!

              • Shedding Light on Spinal Cord Injuries

                https://neurosciencenews.com/spinal-cord-injury-10617/

                When spinal cord damage occurs, the endothelial cells that line blood vessels are activated to remove potentially harmful material, like myelin debris, from the site of the injury. However, Ren and her team discovered that this process may be responsible for causing further harm.

                “The consequences of the effort of endothelial cells to clear myelin debris is often severe, contributing to post-traumatic degeneration of the spinal cord and to the functional disabilities often associated with spinal cord injuries,” said Ren, whose team conducted the study over a period of five years.

                Myelin debris at the injury site comes from a shattering of the insulation protecting axons — the central nervous system’s primary transmission lines.
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • Cancer growth in the body could originate from a single cell – targeting it could revolutionise treatment

                  https://theconversation.com/cancer-g...se%20treatment

                  Cancer treatment still follows a practically medieval method of cut, burn or poison.
                  Cancer stem cells (CSCs): metabolic strategies for their identification and eradication

                  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5941316/
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • How a fungus can cripple the immune system

                    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2019.01.001

                    Healthy people usually have no problem if spores find their way into their body, as their immune defence system will put the spores out of action. However, the fungus can threaten the lives of people with a compromised immune system, such as AIDS patients or people who are immunosuppressed following an organ transplantation.
                    Sometimes aspergillomae may form in lung tissue which requires a thoracotomy, these patients can be difficult to rehab
                    Last edited by Jo Bowyer; 09-02-2019, 05:34 PM.
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • drcph
                      drcph commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Jo, link not working? (thinking about this with "chronic lyme" patients and post fecal transplant mold infection patients.... Thank you, Cathy

                    • Jo Bowyer
                      Jo Bowyer commented
                      Editing a comment
                      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0208095614.htm

                      I have had trouble with the link Cathy, hope this one works.

                    • drcph
                      drcph commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thank you Jo, that one worked!

                  • Alzheimer's Prevention

                    https://www.edge.org/conversation/li...ers-prevention

                    Four years ago the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer’s Association got together and led a council. They called together many scientists who were leaders in the field and came to the conclusion that Alzheimer’s disease is preventable in many cases. That was largely based on a fantastic paper that came out a few years ago, a population-based estimate of risk, which showed very clearly that at least a third of all Alzheimer’s cases are not caused by genetic mutations, but rather by the way we live our lives. That’s a very powerful message.
                    The screening process is very thorough. We need to look for thyroid disease, vitamin deficiencies, and anything that can be going on in the brain such as a stroke, vascular issues, brain tumors, or normal pressure hydrocephalus—all these things we can screen for using different tools. We do blood tests, we do a lot of screenings, and we do brain scans. It is a very specialized examination, not what your typical doctor would do. They do check for some parameters like thyroid function, cholesterol levels, and triglycerides—the basic tests are usually done by a GP, but then we add a whole other level.
                    One of the most important factors for women is measuring hormones and addressing hormonal health. As a brain scientist, one might think it's strange for me to be talking about hormones, because in Western medicine we look at everything slightly separately. If I’m looking at your brain, I shouldn't quite care about your ovaries, but it’s important to acknowledge that the brain is not an isolated organ; it's in charge of the body, and every organ in the body will report back to brain. There are constant feedback loops and different mechanisms by which your brain impacts the rest of you, but the rest of you also impacts your brain back.
                    What we have found using brain scans is that for women going through menopause, it is a shock to the brain as well as to the rest of the body. That’s quite new. We just published that in 2017. As women go through menopause, it’s not just overnight. What happens is that you’re pre-menopausal and your estrogen and your hormones start changing; then you go through peri-menopause, which is when you start missing your cycle; and then you're post-menopausal or menopausal a full year after your last menstrual cycle, which is usually around age fifty-one for most women in the United States, but also in the rest of the world. The brain shows a similar pattern of change.
                    When women say, “I’m having hot flashes. I’m having night sweats. I’m feeling depressed all of a sudden. I can’t think straight. I can’t sleep at night,” that doesn’t start in your ovaries; it starts inside your brain. These are brain symptoms of menopause that are usually completely overlooked because the women with the symptoms would go to a gynecologist, not to a neurologist. There's a gap in clinical care that is due to the fact that we don’t think of hormones as something that affects your brain. Most importantly, what we have shown is that as the energy levels go down, that’s when women start accumulating Alzheimer’s plaques. Usually, Alzheimer’s disease in women begins when we are in our late forties and fifties, which is quite shocking.
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • The hormone system works like a democracy: every tissue in the body is an endocrine organ asserting its needs and demands

                      https://aeon.co/essays/the-revolutio...632ad-69418129

                      Karsenty and others eventually confirmed that bones secrete hormones essential for an animal’s health. And with that finding, the skeleton joined a growing list of tissues shown to participate in a body-wide conversation between organs. The traditional concept of the endocrine system as a second-command system working in tandem with the nervous system – and largely directed by the brain – is being replaced with a more autonomous view of interorgan communication, one in which most, if not all, organs have a voice. Grasping the logic of a control system in which the body’s organs are both the targets of hormonal commands and the source of them is still only beginning, but the clinical implications are sure to be profound.
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment


                      • Scientists create new map of brain's immune system

                        https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0219132853.htm



                        "We were able to show that there is only a single type of microglia in the brain that exist in multiple flavours," says project head Prof. Dr. Marco Prinz, medical director of the Institute of Neuropathology at the Medical Center -- University of Freiburg. "These immune cells are very versatile all-rounders, not specialists, as has been the textbook opinion up to now," sums up Prof. Prinz.

                        Versatile All-Rounders, Not Specialists

                        Since the immune cells located in the blood cannot reach the brain and spinal cord on account of the blood-brain barrier, the brain needs its own immune defense: the microglia. These phagocytes of the brain develop very early on in the process of embryonic development and later remove invading germs and dead nerve cells. They contribute to the maturation and lifelong malleability of the brain. It was previously unclear whether there are subtypes of microglia for the various functions they serve in the healthy and diseased brain.
                        Jo Bowyer
                        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                        Comment

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