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  • Jo Bowyer
    started a topic CT Movement papers

    Movement papers

    EEG Single-Trial Detection of Gait Speed Changes during Treadmill Walk
    http://www.aacijournal.com/content/7/S1/S1

    Abstract

    In this study, we analyse the electroencephalography (EEG) signal associated with gait speed changes (i.e. acceleration or deceleration). For data acquisition, healthy subjects were asked to perform volitional speed changes between 0, 1, and 2 Km/h, during treadmill walk. Simultaneously, the treadmill controller modified the speed of the belt according to the subject’s linear speed. A classifier is trained to distinguish between the EEG signal associated with constant speed gait and with gait speed changes, respectively. Results indicate that the classification performance is fair to good for the majority of the subjects, with accuracies always above chance level, in both batch and pseudo-online approaches. Feature visualisation and equivalent dipole localisation suggest that the information used by the classifier is associated with increased activity in parietal areas, where mu and beta rhythms are suppressed during gait speed changes. Specifically, the parietal cortex may be involved in motor planning and visuomotor transformations throughout the online gait adaptation, which is in agreement with previous research. The findings of this study may help to shed light on the cortical involvement in human gait control, and represent a step towards a BMI for applications in post-stroke gait rehabilitation.

  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Upbeat music can sweeten tough exercise

    Insufficiently-active people might benefit from choosing the right tunes

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0620100027.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Adding motor imagery to motor control training can improve neck sensorimotor function

    https://bodyinmind.org/motor-imagery...ody+in+Mind%29

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Does variability of footfall kinematics correlate with dynamic stability of the centre of mass during walking?

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0217460

    An efficient walking pattern is characterised by a variety of distinct gait domains, such as pace, rhythm, symmetry, variability and balance [1, 2]. With age, as well as in subjects with neuromotor deficits, all or some of these domains are perturbed, which ultimately results in an increased risk of falling [35]. While measures to quantify variability during walking are known to be sensitive in the discrimination of faller and non-faller subjects, their power to estimate fall risk on an individual basis prior to a first fall, remains unclear [3, 68]. It is generally assumed that the movement of the centre of mass (CoM) during walking is maintained (returned back to a steady-state after a perturbation) by effectively negotiating the placement of our feet, formally described as the base of support (BoS), and provides the primary means for stabilizing the system [912].

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The dancing species: how moving together in time helped make us human

    https://aeon.co/ideas/the-dancing-sp...sletter_banner

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  • Jo Bowyer
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    Walking and strength training may decrease the risk of dying from liver disease

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0519162350.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Rapid Visuomotor Responses Reflect Value-Based Decisions

    http://www.jneurosci.org/content/39/20/3906.full

    Our results show that the size of rapid visuomotor responses to a sudden change in visual feedback about limb position depends upon the relative values of potential movement goals. Previous work showed that rapid feedback responses are flexibly regulated according to multiple components of the task, including timing (Franklin and Wolpert, 2008; Cluff and Scott, 2015) and spatial precision constraints (Gallivan et al., 2016), the presence of obstacles in the environment (Nashed et al., 2012, 2014), and the energetic or control costs associated with potential corrective responses (Nashed et al., 2012, 2014; Pruszynski et al., 2014). Rapid feedback responses can also reflect a control policy intermediate between those associated with competing goals when there is uncertainty about which goal will ultimately be specified (Gallivan et al., 2016). This illustrates that sensorimotor control policies are sufficiently flexible to take account of multiple potential goals simultaneously. However, this previous work that examined the flexibility of fast feedback responses manipulated physical characteristics of the task that are inherently coupled to the required motor outputs. Our current results show that feedback control is sensitive to decision variables, such as prospective reward, under otherwise identical task conditions. This suggests that feedback control policies that govern state-dependent transformations of sensory feedback to motor commands can be tailored to implement value-based choice.
    A rational agent seeking to maximize cumulative rewards in the long run should make choices according to the relative value of available options. However, humans and other animals often behave according to risk-modulated value functions; they make choices that lead to lower overall gains by favoring larger, less certain rewards when risk seeking, or more certain but smaller rewards when risk averse. Both risk-seeking and risk-averse behavior have been exhibited in motor decision tasks, depending on factors such as the probability of successful outcomes (Trommershäuser et al., 2008; Wu et al., 2009; Nagengast et al., 2010, 2011b; McDougle et al., 2016). Interestingly, the valence of risk modulation in motor tasks is often mirror opposite to that observed for economic decisions (Wu et al., 2009; McDougle et al., 2016). Our current results suggest that rapid feedback responses are tuned to a risk-averse value function. An interesting future question might be to determine whether an individual's risk sensitivity in visuomotor response regulation correlates with their risk sensitivity in cognitive decision-making.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Subgroups of lumbo-pelvic flexion kinematics are present in people with and without persistent low back pain

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-018-2233-1

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Don’t just do it, think about it too: how Gilbert Ryle’s philosophy of mind can help athletes teach themselves to improve

    https://aeon.co/essays/dont-just-do-...h-gilbert-ryle

    For Ryle, thinking is something that we do in our actions. We can get a grip on this idea by considering one of Ryle’s descriptions of skilful action:
    A mountaineer walking over ice-covered rocks in a high wind in the dark does not move his limbs by blind habit; he thinks what he is doing, he is ready for emergencies, he economises in effort, he makes tests and experiments; in short he walks with some degree of skill and judgment. If he makes a mistake, he is inclined not to repeat it, and if he finds a new trick effective he is inclined to continue to use it and to improve on it. He is concomitantly walking and teaching himself how to walk in conditions of this sort.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    New role for sensory signals in the brain

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0411145134.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Effect of 6-week retro or forward walking program on pain, functional disability, quadriceps muscle strength, and performance in individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial (retro-walking trial)

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2537-9

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Predicting the consequences of physical activity: An investigation into the relationship between anxiety sensitivity, interoceptive accuracy and action

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0210853

    As we negotiate our environment, we are continually required to disambiguate noisy and uncertain information [1]. The actions of our body, and the continual predictions of the consequences of these actions, help us to make sense of a changing world [2]. We are able to actively filter information and flexibly update our predictions as our body and the environment change [3]. Sensing changes specific to the body is known as interoception, and it is comprised of 3 dimensions: Interoceptive accuracy- objective performance in detection; Interoceptive sensibility- self-evaluated assessment of interoception; Interoceptive awareness- metacognitive appraisal of accuracy [4]. It has been proposed that the ability to precisely detect changes in our body—Interoceptive Accuracy—promotes flexible updating of the predictions of our body and allows for a more fine-tuned regulation of behaviour [59].

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Discovery and recognition of motion primitives in human activities

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0214499

    Activity recognition is widely acknowledged as a core topic in computer vision, witness the huge amount of research done in recent years spanning a wide number of applications from sport to cinema, from human robot interaction to security and rehabilitation.

    Activity recognition has evolved from earlier focus on action recognition and gesture recognition. The main difference being that activity recognition is completely general as it concerns any kind of human activity, which can last few seconds or minutes or hours, from daily activities such as cooking, self-care, talking at the phone, cleaning a room, up to sports or recreation such as playing basketball or fishing. Nowadays there are a number of publicly available datasets dedicated to the collection of any kind of human activity, likewise a number of challenges (see for example the ActivityNet challenge [1]).

    On the other hand, the interest in motion primitives is due to the fact that they are essential for deploying an activity. Think about sport activities, or cooking, or performing arts, which require to purposefully select a specific sequences of movements. Likewise daily activities such as cleaning, or cooking, or washing the dishes or preparing the table require precise motion sequences to accomplish the task. Indeed, the compositional nature of human activities, under body and kinematics constraints, has attracted the interest of many research areas such as in computer vision [2, 3], in neurophysiology [4, 5], in sports and rehabilitation [6], and in biomechanics [7] and in robotics [8, 9, 10].

    The goal of this work is to automatically discover the start and end points where primitives of 6 identified body parts occur throughout the course of an activity, and recognize each of the occurred primitives. The idea is that these primitives sort out a non-complete set of human movements, which combined together can form a wide range of human activities, in so providing a compositional approach to the analysis of human activities.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Biomechanical evaluation of the influence of posterolateral corner structures on cruciate ligaments forces during simulated gait and squatting

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0214496

    In the past decade, the complexity of the PLC structures in the knee joint has been revealed, biomechanically and clinically [8, 9]. The key elements of the PLC of the knee are the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), popliteofibular ligament (PFL), and popliteus tendon (PT). Of these, the LCL and PFL are considered the primary static stabilizers of the PLC structures. The PT is a dynamic stabilizer of the knee, because the tendon covers the region from the PLC of the proximal part of the tibia to the musculotendinous junction. The PLC structures and the PCL work together to resist external tibial rotation and posterior tibial translation. In addition, the PLC structures that have been reported to be contributory to most joint movements have different effects, depending on static and dynamic loading conditions. These structures are functionally loaded in several joint loading conditions, and they could function either as primary or important secondary stabilizers during joint motion testing [10, 11].

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Aberrant intervertebral motion in patients with treatment-resistant nonspecific low back pain: a retrospective cohort study and control comparison

    https://link.springer.com/article/10...586-018-5666-1

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