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  • Does the first trimester of pregnancy induce alterations in the walking pattern?

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0209766

    The issue concerning locomotion of pregnant women has become an area of interest for many scientists who indicate existence of different adaptation mechanisms of the movement system and a strategy of moving woman’s body in that physiological condition [1, 2, 3]. Adaptation of the mother’s organism to the developing foetus takes place for 40 weeks and concerns both sexual organs and functioning of the hormonal, cardio-vascular, respiratory and musculoskeletal systems. Comparison of the studies showed different periods of pregnancy when the registrations of women's gait were performed (As described in detail previously [4]). However, an analysis of literature showed only two items monitoring the influence of pregnancy on the movement system reactions during gait considering the period before [5, 6]. Some of the researchers found a feigned solution to the problem by monitoring women’s gait from the first semester and treating the obtained results as a reference point for subsequent measurements following the advance of pregnancy [7, 8, 9, 10]. However, it is still unclear whether changes in a woman’s body induced in the first trimester affect their movement system and method of realising their gait. The first trimester that lasts from the first day after the end of the last menstruation till the 12th week of pregnancy is a period of changes in the hormonal system, and the level of some hormones may affect, among others, structure of movements [11]. There is an initial increase of relaxin levels until the peak value in the 12th week followed by a decline until the 17th week. Relaxin is known to remodel pelvic connective tissue and activate the collagenolytic system. This, in turn, leads to laxity in the ligamentous and connective tissue, which is the functional adaptation to the foetus developing in the womb [12]. That is why it is essential to understand any potential effects of pregnancy on gait pattern, especially if increased incidence of falls and musculoskeletal pain occurrence during pregnancy is considered [13, 14].
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation facilitates immediate restoration of dormant motor and autonomic supraspinal pathways after chronic neurologically complete spinal cord injury

      https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/neu.2018.6006 Abstract

      Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation (eSCS) in combination with extensive rehabilitation has been reported to restore volitional movement in a select group of subjects after motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Numerous questions about the generalizability of these findings to patients with longer term SCI have arisen, especially regarding the possibility of restoring autonomic function. To better understand the effect of eSCS on volitional movement and autonomic function, two female participants five and ten years after injury at ages 48 and 52 respectively with minimal spinal cord preservation on MRI were implanted with an eSCS system at the vertebral T12 level. We demonstrated that eSCS can immediately restore volitional movement in two female participants in their fifth and sixth decade of life with motor and sensory-complete SCI, five and ten years after sustaining severe radiographic injuries, and without prescribed or significant prehabilitation. Both patients experienced significant improvements in surface EMG power during a volitional control task with eSCS on. Cardiovascular function was also restored with eSCS in one participant with cardiovascular dysautonomia using specific eSCS settings during tilt challenge while not affecting function in a participant with normal cardiovascular function. Orgasm was achieved for the first time since injury in one participant with and immediately following eSCS. Bowel-bladder synergy improved in both participants while restoring volitional urination in one with eSCS. While numerous questions remain, the ability to restore some supraspinal control over motor function below the level of injury, cardiovascular function, sexual function, and bowel and bladder function should promote intense efforts to investigate and develop optimization strategies to maximize recovery in all participants with chronic SCI.
      This subject has been trending on the UK news channels in recent days, I couldn't find an open access version.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • Researchers are worried that people with chronic disease are not being active enough

        https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0204200852.htm

        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • How a golf swing can lead to early lumbar degeneration

          https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0205090519.htm
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • Gait analysis after total hip arthroplasty using direct anterior approach versus anterolateral approach: a systematic review and meta-analysis

            https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2450-2
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • How the brain remembers amputated limbs – and continues to control them

              https://theconversation.com/how-the-...control%20them
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • Patterns of muscle coordination during dynamic glenohumeral joint elevation: An EMG study

                https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0211800


                Abstract


                The shoulder relies heavily on coordinated muscle activity for normal function owing to its limited osseous constraint. However, previous studies have failed to examine the sophisticated interrelationship between all muscles. It is essential for these normal relationships to be defined as a basis for understanding pathology. Therefore, the primary aim of the study was to investigate shoulder inter-muscular coordination during different planes of shoulder elevation. Twenty healthy subjects were included. Electromyography was recorded from 14 shoulder girdle muscles as subjects performed shoulder flexion, scapula plane elevation, abduction and extension. Cross-correlation was used to examine the coordination between different muscles and muscle groups. Significantly higher coordination existed between the rotator cuff and deltoid muscle groups during the initial (Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) = 0.79) and final (PCC = 0.74) stages of shoulder elevation compared to the mid-range (PCC = 0.34) (p = 0.020–0.035). Coordination between the deltoid and a functional adducting group comprising the latissimus dorsi and teres major was particularly high (PCC = 0.89) during early shoulder elevation. The destabilising force of the deltoid, during the initial stage of shoulder elevation, is balanced by the coordinated activity of the rotator cuff, latissimus dorsi and teres major. Stability requirements are lower during the mid-range of elevation. At the end-range of movement the demand for muscular stability again increases and higher coordination is seen between the deltoid and rotator cuff muscle groups. It is proposed that by appreciating the sophistication of normal shoulder function targeted evidence-based rehabilitation strategies for conditions such as subacromial impingement syndrome or shoulder instability can be developed.
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • Individuals physically interacting in a group rapidly coordinate their movement by estimating the collective goal

                  https://elifesciences.org/articles/41328


                  Abstract


                  How can a human collective coordinate, for example to move a banquet table, when each person is influenced by the inertia of others who may be inferior at the task? We hypothesized that large groups cannot coordinate through touch alone, accruing to a zero-sum scenario where individuals inferior at the task hinder superior ones. We tested this hypothesis by examining how dyads, triads and tetrads, whose right hands were physically coupled together, followed a common moving target. Surprisingly, superior individuals followed the target accurately even when coupled to an inferior group, and the interaction benefits increased with the group size. A computational model shows that these benefits arose as each individual uses their respective interaction force to infer the collective’s target and enhance their movement planning, which permitted coordination in seconds independent of the collective’s size. By estimating the collective’s movement goal, its individuals make physical interaction beneficial, swift and scalable.
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • Minimal force transmission between human thumb and index finger muscles under passive conditions

                    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0212496

                    When muscles produce force, it is thought that force is only transmitted in series from muscles to tendon and bone. This idea implies that muscles act in mechanical isolation and forms the basis for many animal and human biomechanical models [1]. However, mechanical connections (e.g. connective tissue) between adjacent muscles may transmit forces under physiological conditions [26]. Furthermore, it has been speculated that abnormal intermuscle force transmission may underlie pathological conditions such as spasticity and contracture [7]. Intermuscle force transmission violates the assumption that muscles act in mechanical isolation, and implies that predictions from many biomechanical models could be in error because of mechanical interactions between muscles. Consequently, it is important to quantify the size and direction of intermuscle force transmission in various conditions, including the passive stretch of an adjacent muscle.
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • People with osteoporosis should avoid spinal poses in yoga, study says

                      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0221095111.htm

                      It is incredibly difficult to persuade people who have been doing yoga for decades to modify their practice.
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment


                      • The learning effect with 1RM strength tests

                        https://motorimpairment.neura.edu.au...trength-tests/
                        Jo Bowyer
                        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                        Comment


                        • Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait

                          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5365132/

                          This paper has been corrected.

                          Musculoskeletal disorders are commonly seen in obese individuals and one of the most common and disabling of these is knee osteoarthritis (OA) [4].

                          Individuals who are obese and have knee pain may adopt different gait patterns to compensate both for the extra weight and joint pain. While no prior studies have focused specifically on obese persons with knee pain, studies of obese adults showed that they walked with decreased velocity [5, 6]. As body mass index (BMI) increases, gait speed decreases [7]. Past studies of knee joint kinematics mainly focused on sagittal and coronal plane motions, i.e., knee joint flexion/extension [5, 810] and varus/valgus rotation [9, 10]. Even so, there is no clear consensus on knee joint kinematics in obese individuals during walking. For example, Haight et al.[8] reported that obese individuals walked with a less flexed knee during the stance phase compared to non-obese individuals. Vismara et al. [11] concluded that the range of knee flexion excursion during gait was not significantly different than a healthy group. The inconsistency and variation in the literature may be due to differences in measurement methods or the presence of different lower extremity joint pathology such as pain which is extremely common in obese adults and may cause gait modifications. For instance, knee pain is a major symptom in individuals with knee OA and reduced range of knee flexion during gait has been frequently reported [1214].
                          The smaller range of motion of the obese patients indicated that these individuals use a stiffening knee strategy despite maintaining the knee in more flexion during functional activities [35]. This strategy for reduced range of motion is also found in knee OA patients [1214, 36] and obese individuals without knee pain [8], meaning both extra body weight and pain contribute to the gait pattern change. As walking has been routinely suggested for obese patients as a safe activity to increase energy expenditure, increasing the knee joint range of motion while walking should be addressed, and this could potentially better distribute contact stress to prevent the local stress concentration.
                          Jo Bowyer
                          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                          Comment


                          • Effects of 8-week core training on core endurance and running economy

                            https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0213158
                            Jo Bowyer
                            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                            Comment


                            • Replacing sitting time with physical activity associated with lower risk of death

                              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0325163024.htm
                              Jo Bowyer
                              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                              Comment


                              • Even light physical activity has health benefits – new research

                                https://theconversation.com/even-lig...new%20research
                                Jo Bowyer
                                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                                Comment

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