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  • Higher fitness level can determine longer lifespan after age 70

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0306081829.htm
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • What does quality of life mean to older adults? A thematic synthesis

      https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0213263

      The need for care services for older adults living at home will increase in the coming years because of the ageing population and deinstitutionalisation [13]. More and more older adults will age in their own home and the majority of them has one or more chronic disorders [4, 5]. For many of these disorders, cure is not an option. However, care is required to manage these disorders and to provide assistance with daily tasks in order to enable older adults to age at home. Care and support are provided by informal carers as well as various formal care services like rehabilitation, nursing care at home, day care, mental health and general practice care [6, 7].

      At the same time, care providers are confronted with care reforms, budget cuts and increasing regulations for national and local commissioning and audit procedures [8]. As a result, the accountability of care services becomes increasingly important and there is a need to establish the value of such services. One way to determine this value is by assessing the outcomes achieved at the client level [9]. Maintenance of QoL is one the most important outcomes of care services for older adults. Several international action plans on ageing endorse the importance of QoL [1013] and international interest in the measurement of QoL of older adults is growing [1417].


      The perception of health is also determined by the point of reference used; older adults compare their health for instance often with that of others their age. The experience of health was therefore described as a relative phenomenon [36]: it is experienced and evaluated according to what one finds reasonable to expect, given one’s age, history, medical condition, and social situation. For example, some older adults find declining ability frustrating "I cannot do what I did ten years ago, and I get very angryI get disgusted with myself" ([42], p.934), while others were more accepting, saying that other people are worse off, or that pain, fatigue and illness were to be expected in old age. This explains why older adults may still perceive their health as ‘good’ despite chronic diseases, illnesses and frailty [59, 60, 67]. Some older adults are committed to improve their QoL by trying to influence their health with a positive attitude and an active lifestyle.

      Health was described as important because it is the basis for many other QoL aspects: “What mostly controls it is your personal health. That determines what you can do.” ([72], p.55). Good health appeared to facilitate the ability to carry out meaningful activities, to take care of yourself, to perform household tasks, to get out, communicate and participate. Murphy et al. [70] noticed that especially as participant’s physical functioning declined older adults started to redefine health in terms of abilities rather than absence of illness, e.g. “Health is to a great extent being able to look after yourself” ([49], p.292). Only when older adults were severely restricted in their ‘going and doing’ [42], they experienced poor health. Such experiences were connected with negative emotions of sadness, anxiety and sorrow [53].

      Autonomy: Being able to manage on your own, retaining dignity and not feeling like a burden.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • Is there an accurate relationship between simple self-reported functional limitations and the assessment of physical capacity in early old age?

        https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0211853
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • Different strength declines in leg primary movers versus stabilizers across age—Implications for the risk of falls in older adults?

          https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0213361
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • Pneumonia-associated death in patients with dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

            https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0213825

            The aims of the present study were to elucidate the frequency of pneumonia-associated death in older adults with dementia and how the frequency of pneumonia-associated death differ according to the data on cause of death (autopsy or death certificate). The results can contribute to the clinical management of patients with dementia in preventing pneumonia, to maximize life expectancy in these patients.
            I have an issue with this. Pneumonia used to be known as "the old man's friend", as it was coexistent with increasing frailty. I was often asked to treat these patients in order to get air entry into the affected lobe(s). I would strongly advise elders to write end of life directives in order to avoid aggressive life preserving measures, which may be wanted by relatives, but not by the individual concerned. On several occasions I was punched and/or bitten. I don't blame the patients, I would probably do the same to someone who was preventing me from dying at my own pace.
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • 'Inflamm-aging' causes loss of bone healing ability in the elderly

              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0318151746.htm

              The current study explains how this age-driven increase in immune signals diminishes the ability of stem cells -- essential ingredients in bone repair -- to multiply. This results in a smaller number of stem cells in the aged skeleton, say the study authors, and compromises their ability to help make new bone after a fracture. The research team also restored skeletal stem cell number and function by treating aging mice with an anti-inflammatory component of aspirin.
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • A single sweaty workout may boost some people’s memory

                https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...&utm_campaign=
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • Risk factors associated with low handgrip strength in the older Korean population

                  https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0214612

                  Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, is associated with poor quality of life, disability and mortality [13]. Because South Korea is one of the fastest aging countries in the world, the prevalence of sarcopenia is also rapidly increasing [4]. Recently, sarcopenia has become one of the most serious public health issues in Korea. Accordingly, there has been increased interest and related research on sarcopenia [5].

                  The prevention and treatment of sarcopenia begins with the identification of individuals at risk of the condition. The diagnosis of sarcopenia is based on the assessment of muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance. Recently, the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People and the Asian Working Group of Sarcopenia suggested cut-off values for evaluation of muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance [6, 7]. Among the measures of muscle strength, handgrip strength (HGS) is widely used because it can be easily measured in the clinical setting [8]. Previous studies have revealed that low HGS is associated with falls, disability, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased mortality [911]. Also, various factors related to HGS have been identified. Although old age, low body mass index (BMI), and less physical activity was highly related to lower HGS, the relationship between HGS and other factors such as marital status, level of education, health related behaviors and comorbidities showed inconsistent results [1214].
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • The implementation of expectancy-based strategic processes is delayed in normal aging

                    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0214322

                    It well established that many aspects of cognition decline with normal aging, including attention, working memory (WM), and episodic memory [1, 2]. In an attempt to provide a potentially unifying underlying mechanism that could explain the diversity of age-related cognitive deficits, several alternative hypotheses have been proposed.

                    An influential account is the processing speed hypothesis of cognitive aging [3], which attributes age-related cognitive decline to a general slowing of information processing. This slowing in cognitive processing speed has been found for example in several perceptual speed tasks involving visual search, elementary comparison, and substitution operations [4, 5].

                    Another leading alternative, though not incompatible hypothesis suggests that cognitive deficits associated with aging would mainly be the result of an inability to inhibit or control for interference from task-irrelevant (external or internal) information [68]. Evidence supporting the inhibitory account of cognitive aging comes from a variety of experimental tasks thought to draw on inhibitory (top-down) control. Thus, older adults usually display less efficient inhibition of dominant but inappropriate reactions, as it is for example the case in the antisaccade task [9]. Performance by older adults is also poorer than for younger ones on WM tasks that require actively holding the relevant information in an easily accessible form, especially in the face of distraction or interference [10, 11].

                    Older adults can also show impoverished inhibitory memory control relative to younger subjects in different episodic memory tasks (e.g., intentional or directed forgetting [12, 13]), as well as in selective attention tasks that require active rejection of distracting information.
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • Improved mood despite worsening physical health in older adults: Findings from the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS)

                      https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0214988

                      Mental health appears to be a fundamentally different construct than physical health in older adults, allowing seniors to experience improved mood despite declining physical health. Clinicians should not consider depression in elderly populations as an inevitability of aging.
                      Among those with depression, it is older adults who are most likely to attempt and complete suicide.[1] The role of concomitant physical disease, and the etiology of depression among seniors are poorly understood and confusing. Older adults are more likely than the young to have chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or respiratory compromise, all recognized both as risk factors for and complications of depression.[25] Yet, paradoxically, most research demonstrates a decrease in prevalence of depression with increasing age.[68] There is evidence that some individuals, including seniors, with physical illness may experience a response shift of recalibrating their physical health expectations, reprioritizing their values, or reconceptualizing constructs in order to maintain their quality of life while experiencing a decline in health.[912]
                      I perceive a change in this demographic since the 1970s. Many of my elders have good to excellent self reported QoL, which wasn't the case in previous years. In the 1970s the people I saw had expectations of younger family members which were not being met. They were unsettled by children moving on to different lifestyles, or out of the area.
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment


                      • Could eating garlic reduce aging-related memory problems?

                        https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0408091259.htm

                        Consuming garlic helps counteract age-related changes in gut bacteria associated with memory problems, according to a new study conducted with mice. The benefit comes from allyl sulfide, a compound in garlic known for its health benefits.
                        Jo Bowyer
                        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                        Comment


                        • The Diagnosis Is Alzheimer’s. But That’s Probably Not the Only Problem.

                          https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/08/h...5cde-151138121

                          Most people with dementia have a number of brain abnormalities, not just Alzheimer’s disease. The finding is forcing scientists to rethink the search for treatments.
                          Jo Bowyer
                          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                          Comment


                          • Comfortably numb – why some older people turn to cannabis for pain relief

                            https://theconversation.com/comforta...n-relief-91350
                            Jo Bowyer
                            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                            Comment


                            • Chronic diseases restrict the mobility of older people -- often unconsciously

                              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0411101740.htm

                              Exercise therapies tailored to the type of disease can significantly improve individuals' physical functioning, mobility and possibilities for independent living.

                              "It is important that also those with long-term illnesses are able to move, taking into account the safety issues related to the illness, of course," Kujala says. "More attention should be paid to the use of exercise therapy in healthcare. This benefits both individuals and society."
                              Many of mine have been given fitbits by their families. Some families have gone so over the top in terms of monitoring that the elders have taken to sabotage! I find it difficult to mediate sometimes, having reached early old age myself.
                              Jo Bowyer
                              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                              Comment


                              • Strategies for optimising musculoskeletal health in the 21st century

                                https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-019-2510-7

                                We live in a world with an ever-increasing ageing population. Studying healthy ageing and reducing the socioeconomic impact of age-related diseases is a key research priority for the industrialised and developing countries, along with a better mechanistic understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of ageing that occurs in a number of age-related musculoskeletal disorders. Arthritis and musculoskeletal disorders constitute a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for our health and social-care systems.

                                By gaining a better understanding of healthy musculoskeletal ageing and the risk factors associated with premature ageing and senescence, we can provide better care and develop new and better-targeted therapies for common musculoskeletal disorders. This review is the outcome of a two-day multidisciplinary, international workshop sponsored by the Institute of Advanced Studies entitled “Musculoskeletal Health in the 21st Century” and held at the University of Surrey from 30th June-1st July 2015.

                                The aim of this narrative review is to summarise current knowledge of musculoskeletal health, ageing and disease and highlight strategies for prevention and reducing the impact of common musculoskeletal diseases.
                                Jo Bowyer
                                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                                Comment

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