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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The fast track to a life well lived is feeling grateful

    https://aeon.co/ideas/the-fast-track...92ab2-69418129

    My chronic patients fall into three main groups: pain, dizziness/disequilibrium and comorbidities associated with ageing. Those who help out others, either by doing voluntary work for organisations or helping family, friends, neighbours and strangers, tend to do well. Resentment experienced by those who don't want to help others, but feel that they have to, is an aggravating factor to symptoms experienced, especially when there are feelings that the person needing help coulda, shoulda done something different.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    University finds dozens of papers by late — and controversial — psychologist Hans Eysenck “unsafe”

    https://retractionwatch.com/2019/10/...ysenck-unsafe/

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    People eat more when dining with friends and family

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1004105637.htm

    Experts at the University of Birmingham led a team of researchers in Britain and Australia who found that eating 'socially' has a powerful effect on increasing food intake relative to dining alone, after evaluating 42 existing studies of research into social dining.

    They explain that ancient hunter gatherers shared food because it protected against periods of food insecurity -- this survival mechanism may still persist today, leading to people eating more with friends and family because:
    • Eating with others is more enjoyable and enhanced reward from social eating could increase consumption.
    • Social norms might 'permit' overeating in company but sanction it when eating alone.
    • Providing food becomes associated with praise and recognition from friends and family, strengthening social bonds.


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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Incidence of mild cognitive impairment in World Trade Center responders: Long-term consequences of re-experiencing the events on 9/11/2001

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...52872919300570

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Researchers identify glial cells as critical players in brain's response to social stress

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0813080212.htm

    Exposure to violence, social conflict, and other stressors increase risk for psychiatric conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Not everyone who experiences significant stress will develop such a response, however, and the cellular and molecular basis for an individual's underlying resilience or susceptibility to stressful events has remained poorly understood. Now, a newly published paper in the journal eLife from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center, CUNY suggests that the behavior of oligodendrocytes -- the glial cells that produce the myelin sheath that protects nerve fibers -- plays a critical role in determining whether we succumb to or tolerate stress.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Improvement in mental health following total hip arthroplasty: the role of pain and function

    https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...A1719A52CE5E26

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The problem of mindfulness

    https://aeon.co/essays/mindfulness-i...438e6-69418129

    My own gripes with mindfulness are of a different, though related, order. In claiming to offer a multipurpose, multi-user remedy for all occasions, mindfulness oversimplifies the difficult business of understanding oneself. It fits oh-so-neatly into a culture of techno-fixes, easy answers and self-hacks, where we can all just tinker with the contents of our heads to solve problems, instead of probing why we’re so dissatisfied with our lives in the first place. As I found with my own experience, though, it’s not enough to simply watch one’s thoughts and feelings. To understand why mindfulness is uniquely unsuited for the project of real self-understanding, we need to probe the suppressed assumptions about the self that are embedded in its foundations.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    How can you go about finding ‘who you really are’ if the whole idea of the one true self is a big fabrication?

    https://aeon.co/essays/why-the-comin...549db-69418129

    Finding one’s true place in the world is a massive trope, not just in film and theatre, but also in literature, education and motivational seminars – any place where young people are involved. In all these cases, the search for the ‘self’ is dubious because it assumes that there is an enduring ‘self’ that lurks within and that can somehow be found. Whereas, in fact, the only ‘self’ we can be sure of is one that changes every second, our decisions and circumstances taking us in an infinite number of directions, moment by moment. And even if we think we have ‘found ourselves’, this is no panacea for the rest of our lives.
    This can be an issue with those who find it difficult to feel better.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Opioid overdose should be treated like attempted suicide: with an emergency hold

    https://www.statnews.com/2019/07/12/...78bf-151138121

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Obesity: stop accusing the poor of making bad choices

    https://theconversation.com/obesity-...-choices-55801

    Last month, the UK health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, called childhood obesity “a national emergency”, but the government has once again delayed publishing its strategy aimed at combating it.

    Obesity is much more common in people with less money and education and this socioeconomic gap is getting larger. An unhealthy diet is a leading risk factor for weight gain and chronic disease and there are marked socioeconomic differences in the types of food consumed.

    Dietary inequalities of a different sort were also a concern 80 years ago. In 1936, John Boyd Orr, a Scottish doctor, published Food, Health and Income, which systematically described British eating habits in a way that was unprecedented and critically important both for nutrition science and public health.

    Britain in the 1930s was rife with diseases related to malnutrition, particularly among the poor. Studies conducted in impoverished areas of Durham and London found rickets in as many as 80% of children, and inequalities in nutrition manifested themselves in height differences of up to five inches (about 13cm) between the lower and higher socioeconomic classes of school-age children.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The red thread of obsession

    https://aeon.co/essays/how-modern-li...c43c0-69418129

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    An ethnography of chronic pain management in primary care: The social organization of physicians’ work in the midst of the opioid crisis

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0215148

    This study reports on physicians’ experiences with chronic pain management. For over a decade prescription opioids have been a primary treatment for chronic pain in North America. However, the current opioid epidemic has complicated long-standing practices for chronic pain management which historically involved prescribing pain medication. Caring for patients with chronic pain occurs within a context in which a growing proportion of patients suffer from chronic rather than acute conditions alongside rising social inequities.

    A similar situation in the UK is now being given increasing media coverage.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    commented on 's reply
    Migrants and the media: what shapes the narratives on immigration in different countries

    https://theconversation.com/migrants...nt%20countries

  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The case for empathy

    https://aeon.co/essays/a-sophisticat...03867-69418129

    Empathy is not imagining how you might feel in the place of another. It is imagining and trying to understand what the other person feels. The difference between thinking about yourself in another’s situation and thinking about the other person in that situation is simple but profound, requiring well-developed, differentiated mental abilities. Empathy is other-focused, not self-focused. Someone with sociopathic tendencies can ‘read’ other people well and understand their emotions. But a sociopathic person reads others in order to manipulate or take advantage of that person. It is not empathy.

    The building blocks of empathy take shape in infancy and develop through a lifetime of learning. By learning from others, people fully develop empathy. Watching how adults interact can model empathy. So too can simple directions to imagine what another person is feeling.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The Depths of Despair Among US Adults Entering Midlife

    https://ajph.aphapublications.org/do...PH.2019.305002

    Although the pronounced increase in death rates among this demographic group has been established, the drivers of this increase are under debate.6,7 Initial research identified suicides, drug overdoses, and alcohol-related liver disease as the causes of death responsible for rising midlife mortality8 and labeled these causes “deaths of despair.”7 Because of the concentration of these deaths among low-educated Whites and in rural areas where economic stagnation has been widely documented, scholars attributed the rise in midlife mortality to a general context of hopelessness and self-destructive behaviors reflecting despair.9,10

    The factors underlying these patterns remain unknown. However, current explanations point to labor market changes driven by globalization and technological change, leading to deteriorating job opportunities, wage stagnation, and declining rates of upward mobility for low-educated individuals.7These economic factors undermined social support by eroding traditional family structures and religious participation, resulting in despair.

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