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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Loneliness is bad for brains

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-brain-changes

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Brain Signature of Depressed Mood Identified

    https://neurosciencenews.com/depress...gnature-10166/

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Lasting Effects of Early Life Stress on Genome, Gut and Brain

    https://neurosciencenews.com/stress-...t-brain-10142/

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Online program helps prevent teen depression

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1102180752.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Can you cure a phobia by medically rewriting the original fear memory?

    https://aeon.co/videos/can-you-cure-...30f1f-69418129

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Why the long face?

    https://aeon.co/essays/why-does-sadn...8c105-69418129



    If depression is a foul miasma wreathing the brain, elegant sadness is more like a peacock’s tail, coloured in blue-gentian and rich marine greens. Is it also universal? To this question, anthropology offers no definitive answer. Yet the condition certainly manifests itself in a suggestive array of cultures. It is the sadness to which the Japanese phrase mono no aware gestures (物の哀れ, literally ‘the beautiful sorrow of things’). It is the haunted simplicity of those musical traditions that spread from Africa into the New World as the Blues. It’s the mixture of strength, energy, pity and melancholy that Claude Lévi-Strauss found in Brazil, encapsulated in the title of his book about his travels there Tristes Tropiques (1955). It’s the insight of Vergil’s Aeneas, as he looks back over his troubled life and forward to troubles yet to some: sunt lacrimae rerum; there are tears in everything, said not mournfully nor hopelessly but as a paradoxical statement about the beauty of the world (Aeneid 1:462).

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    The use and helpfulness of self-management strategies for depression: The experiences of patients

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0206262

    The perspectives of people are obviously subjective, and there is still a question for future research to find out e.g. to what extent the patients really used the strategies that they mentioned in an accurate way. An idea for the future could me to develop a structured depression self-management programme with the help of the results of this survey. The effectiveness of such a programme should be tested in a randomized clinical trial with a sufficient number of participants in order to determine whether the perceived helpful self-management strategies actually help in clinical practice. Next, no simple package or recipe suits every patient. Therefore, a personalized strategy selection may be needed for every patient that should be made in close collaboration of the patient and the professional.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    For the brokenhearted, grief can lead to death

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1022153512.htm

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Emotions: how humans regulate them and why some people can’t

    https://theconversation.com/emotions...0people%20cant

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Normal cognitive and social development require posterior cerebellar activity

    https://elifesciences.org/articles/3...18-elife-alert

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Don’t worry about feeling sad: on the benefits of a blue period

    https://aeon.co/ideas/dont-worry-abo...d5cf7-69418129

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Should you hide negative emotions from children?

    https://theconversation.com/should-y...rom%20children

    Clearly, parents shouldn’t hide emotions or completely unleash them without limits. Instead, they should openly talk about their emotions to their child, especially about the causes of their emotions and how they are trying to deal with them.

    So the next time you feel sad, angry or frustrated and your child is watching you expressing emotion, do explain what’s going on in terms they can understand. You could be doing them a favour. It could also be good for you – children are wonderfully compassionate and will often offer some advice that will most likely put a smile on your face.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    How the loss of Native American languages affects our understanding of the natural world

    I learned a "dead" language in the 1980s, Scottish Gaelic. It has a great many words for health, crofting, fishing, the sea, and of course the weather! Local dialects from all over the UK have some wonderfully descriptive words.

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Saudade: the untranslatable word for the presence of absence

    https://aeon.co/ideas/saudade-the-un...002a3-69418129

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  • Jo Bowyer
    replied
    Gene which decreases risk of social network-related stress, increases finance-related stress risk

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1007084036.htm

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