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  • Narcissism and self-esteem: A nomological network analysis

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0201088


    Abstract


    Similarity between narcissism and self-esteem seems intuitive, as both capture positive perceptions of the self. In the current undertaking, we provide a broad comparison of the nomological networks of grandiose narcissism and explicit self-esteem. Pooling data from 11 existing samples (N = 4711), we compared the relations of narcissism and self-esteem to developmental experiences, individual differences, interpersonal functioning, and psychopathology. Both constructs are positively related to agentic traits and assertive interpersonal approaches, but differ in relation to agreeableness/communion. Self-esteem emerged as a wholly adaptive construct negatively associated with internalizing psychopathology and generally unrelated to externalizing behaviors. Unlike self-esteem, narcissism was related to callousness, grandiosity, entitlement, and demeaning attitudes towards others that likely partially explain narcissism’s links to maladaptive outcomes.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • Team GB star’s death and the pressured world of elite sport

      https://theconversation.com/team-gb-...0elite%20sport

      There’s no denying that being a world class athlete must come with an enormous amount of pressure.
      These accounts have increased awareness of a culture in sport, which places focus on short-term performance at the expense of all else. A culture where the pressures to succeed can have detrimental effects on mental well-being.

      I was a travelling physio for 25 years and to a certain extent, a temporary Mum. Everyone knew that they were there on merit, if the performance indicators dropped, that was it, you were gone. This is particularly hard for a young person who has given everything they have to their sport.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • Language: ‘untranslatable’ words tell us more about English speakers than other cultures

        https://theconversation.com/language...her%20cultures
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • Angry People May Not Be as Smart as They Think

          https://neurosciencenews.com/anger-i...cissists-9695/

          Summary:
          Researchers report those with trait anger, those who get angry as a disposition, are more likely to overestimate their intelligence level. Interestingly, researchers say, trait anger is linked to grandiose narcissism.
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • How sheds can help men stave off loneliness after retirement – according to our new research

            https://theconversation.com/how-shed...new%20research
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • It’s All in the Eyes: Amygdala’s Role in the Experience and Perception of Fear

              https://neurosciencenews.com/amygdala-eye-fear-9722/

              I remember the days when post op pain control was woefully inadequate, especially with regards to paediatric patients.
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • Stop working on your commute – it doesn’t benefit anyone

                https://theconversation.com/stop-wor...nefit%20anyone

                I'm self employed and do about 7 hours CPD a day which I need to do as a generalist. The one time I don't work is when commuting, I try to get all the puzzles done in the paper and look out of the train window, it's one of my favourite times of the day.
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • Why the sexual objectification of men isn’t just a bit of fun

                  https://theconversation.com/why-the-...bit%20of%20fun
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • Not just shellshock: we have accounts of PTSD in warfare from Homer to the Middle Ages

                    https://theconversation.com/not-just...0Middle%20Ages
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • Evidence that addictive behaviors have strong links with ancient retroviral infection

                      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0924174503.htm

                      The integration of the virus predates the emergence of modern humans, as it has been found in Neanderthal and Denisovan genomes, and therefore it is not the behaviour of PWIDs that determines the presence of the virus. Rather, it is likely that the virus is associated with addictive behaviour. Not all PWIDs carry this virus so there will be many other genetic and behavioural factors involved, but this is an important predictive factor in addiction. Furthermore the researchers' experimental work supports a causal role in the expression of RASGRF2 and hence addiction.

                      By providing support for a strong genetic predisposition of addictive behaviour, the Oxford research team advocates in support of medical-pharmacological interventions in support of addicts. Their study shows that new sequencing technologies and large genomic projects such as the 100,000 genomes project will deliver enhanced understanding of genetic features that were previously not well-understood.
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment


                      • Efficacy of popular stress management techniques depend on perspective

                        https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0924102858.htm



                        Spontaneous self-distancing refers to people's tendencies to take a distanced versus an immersed perspective when considering their own experiences, especially their own emotionally laden experiences.

                        To be self-immersed is to see an experience through your own eyes. It's a first-person perspective. Self-distancing, meantime, is a third-person perspective. It's like watching something as a bystander.

                        For people who tend to self-distance, the study's findings suggest that after experiencing awe, personal obstacles associated with a stressful situation seem insignificant compared to the vastness of the awe-inspiring experience. However, those who self-immerse are more likely to see their capabilities, not their obstacles, as insignificant after awe, a perception that can make a stressor seem unmanageable.

                        The findings represent an important step toward understanding how people can better cope with stressful events and how popular stress management strategies, whether appealing to the sacred or sublime, depend on the underlying processes to work.
                        Jo Bowyer
                        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                        Comment


                        • Religion is about emotion regulation, and it’s very good at it

                          https://aeon.co/ideas/religion-is-ab...3fb17-69418129

                          Religion does not help us to explain nature. It did what it could in pre-scientific times, but that job was properly unseated by science.
                          Pope John Paul II declared in 1996 that evolution is a fact and Catholics should get over it.
                          While Freud and Durkheim were right about the important functions of religion, its true value lies in its therapeutic power, particularly its power to manage our emotions. How we feel is as important to our survival as how we think. Our species comes equipped with adaptive emotions, such as fear, rage, lust and so on: religion was (and is) the cultural system that dials these feelings and behaviours up or down.
                          Emotional therapy is the animating heart of religion. Social bonding happens not only when we agree to worship the same totems, but when we feel affection for each other. An affective community of mutual care emerges when groups share rituals, liturgy, song, dance, eating, grieving, comforting, tales of saints and heroes, hardships such as fasting and sacrifice. Theological beliefs are bloodless abstractions by comparison.

                          Emotional management is important because life is hard. The Buddha said: ‘All life is suffering’ and most of us past a certain age can only agree. Religion evolved to handle what I call the ‘vulnerability problem’. When we’re sick, we go to the doctor, not the priest. But when our child dies, or we lose our home in a fire, or we’re diagnosed with Stage-4 cancer, then religion is helpful because it provides some relief and some strength. It also gives us something to do, when there’s nothing we can do.
                          When my husband was in the hospice, he was asked if he wanted to see the vicar, he wasn't sure, but I said "Oh do! You can have a lovely argument with him." The Hospice was non denominational and all clergy were excellent at having a chat with anyone who accepted a visit. For those who wanted doctrine, it was available.
                          Jo Bowyer
                          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                          Comment


                          • Psychologists Define the ‘Dark Core of Personality’

                            https://neurosciencenews.com/persona...ark-core-9919/



                            Ingo Zettler, Professor of Psychology at the University of Copenhagen, and two German colleagues, Morten Moshagen from Ulm University and Benjamin E. Hilbig from the University of Koblenz-Landau, have demonstrated how this common denominator is present in nine of the most commonly studied dark personality traits:
                            • Egoism: an excessive preoccupation with one’s own advantage at the expense of others and the community
                            • Machiavellianism: a manipulative, callous attitude and a belief that the ends justify the means
                            • Moral disengagement: cognitive processing style that allow behaving unethically without feeling distress
                            • Narcissism: excessive self-absorption, a sense of superiority, and an extreme need for attention from others
                            • Psychological entitlement: a recurring belief that one is better than others and deserves better treatment
                            • Psychopathy: lack of empathy and self-control, combined with impulsive behaviour
                            • Sadism: a desire to inflict mental or physical harm on others for one’s own pleasure or to benefit oneself
                            • Self-interest: a desire to further and highlight one’s own social and financial status
                            • Spitefulness: destructiveness and willingness to cause harm to others, even if one harms oneself in the process
                            Jo Bowyer
                            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                            Comment


                            • Gene which decreases risk of social network-related stress, increases finance-related stress risk

                              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1007084036.htm
                              Jo Bowyer
                              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                              Comment


                              • Saudade: the untranslatable word for the presence of absence

                                https://aeon.co/ideas/saudade-the-un...002a3-69418129
                                Jo Bowyer
                                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                                Comment

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