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  • Recovering cancer patients 'badly let down in their time of need', warns Macmillan

    https://www.macmillan.org.uk/aboutus...f413-334261041

    The health and care system is failing to support many recovering cancer patients with the ‘significant physical and emotional trauma’ the illness leaves behind, according to a new report, Am I Meant To Be Okay Now?: Stories of Life After Treatment, launched today by Macmillan Cancer Support at the Houses of Parliament.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • Behavioral correlates of cheating: Environmental specificity and reward expectation

      http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0186054
      Abstract

      Academic dishonesty has been and continues to be a major problem in America’s schools and universities. Such dishonesty is especially important in high schools, where grades earned directly impact the academic careers of students for many years to come. The rising pressure to get the best grades in school, get into the best college, and land the best paying job is a cycle that has made academic dishonesty increase exponentially. Thus, finding the widespread roots of cheating is more important now than ever. In this study, we focus on how societal norms and interactions with peers influence lying about scores in order to obtain a benefit in a high school population. We show that (1) the societal norms that go hand in hand with test-taking in school, as administered by a teacher, significantly dampen small-scale dishonesty, perhaps suggesting that context-dependent rewards offset cheating; (2) providing reminders of societal norms via pre-reported average scores leads to more truthful self-reporting of honesty; (3) the matrix search task was shown to not depend on class difficulty, confirming its effectiveness as an appropriate method for this study; (4) males seem to cheat more than females; and (5) teenagers are more dishonest earlier in the day. We suggest that students understand that cheating is wrong, an idea backed up by the literature, and that an environment which clearly does not condone dishonesty helps dampen widespread cheating in certain instances. This dampening effect seems to be dependent on the reward that students thought they would get for exaggerating their performance.
      I am fascinated by it.

      If people volunteer the information that they cheat or have cheated, they follow it up by saying "I had to". They seem to genuinely believe that they had no choice. It can cause problems if embedded as people become disconnected from reality and are visibly shocked and distressed when shown evidence.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • Investing in Housing for Health Improves Both Mission and Margin

        https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jam...rticle/2661030



        During the last 20 years, low-income families have had their incomes plateau or decline as their housing costs soared. Public aid has not been expanded to meet the growing need: only 1 in 4 households that qualify for housing assistance receives it. As a result, today most renting households below the federal poverty line spend more than half of their income on housing costs, and 1 in 4 spends more than 70% of its income on rent and utility costs alone.1 Rent-burdened families not only have less money to spend on wellness and health care but also regularly face eviction and homelessness, which further threaten their health. According to recent estimates, 2.8 million renting households are at risk of eviction and more than 500 000 people are homeless on any single night.2

        Medical researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the importance of the social determinants of health, which include stable, decent, affordable housing. Housing problems have been associated with a wide array of health complications, including lead exposure and toxic effects, asthma, and depression.3 In the United Kingdom, a study of more than 4000 adults found that childhood housing conditions, such as poor ventilation, were associated with an increased risk of mortality.4 In the United States, data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey estimated that 40% of asthma cases in children were related to the children’s home environment.5 Moreover, the lack of stable housing compromises the ability of clinicians to treat low-income patients with medical complexity, not only because eviction and residential insecurity thwart treatments and continuous care but also because families are often forced to choose between medication costs or rent.

        Acute residential insecurity among low-income households contributes to making the US health care system both ineffective and inefficient. The top 5% of hospital users—overwhelmingly poor and housing insecure—are estimated to consume 50% of health care costs.6 Patients living in poverty in the United States are often the most expensive to treat, in part because of their lack of a stable home. If nothing changes, many individuals with unstable housing will continue to develop difficult-to-treat illnesses and will continue to account for substantial health care costs.
        Housing Is Similar to Drug Prescription

        Recognizing residential insecurity as a cause of preventable hospitalization, some hospitals and health systems have developed permanent, supportive housing models to reduce health care utilization among chronically homeless people.7 The Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers in New Jersey and the Hennepin County Health Center in Minnesota use housing vouchers to reduce health care costs; health care organizations like UnitedHealthcare have invested health care dollars to develop new housing and reduce unnecessary health care utilization; and nonprofit health systems like Bon Secours Health System in Baltimore, Maryland, and Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, have used endowment funds to build affordable housing units and fund community improvement initiatives.

        Many of these models combine affordable housing, offered through centralized units or decentralized vouchers, with integrated case management, often involving medical or behavioral on-site care. This approach has been shown to improve health outcomes while reducing both health care costs and societal costs. For example, randomized trials have found that hospital stays and emergency department visits decreased among homeless individuals after they were offered stable housing and case management.8 Although much needs to be learned from these promising efforts, they remain uncommon approaches to improving health and are often hampered by limited funds as well as a narrow focus on highest-need, highest-cost patients.

        To significantly reduce health disparities through effective housing platforms, far more resources are needed. Instead of operating independently, health and housing sectors should enter into broad partnerships. Approaches are needed that meet both mission- and margin-oriented goals, simultaneously addressing increasing housing costs, inefficient health care spending, and the social determinants of health. This requires the health sector to invest with a double bottom line in mind, expanding affordable housing options to achieve the mission of promoting community-wide health while also reducing costs incurred by ineffectively treating high-cost patients.
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • Depressed fathers risk not getting help

          https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1106112238.htm

          Postnatal depression among new mothers is a well-known phenomenon. Knowledge about depression in new fathers, however, is more limited. A new study shows that depression among new fathers may be more common than previously believed. There is also a major risk that it remains undetected using today's screening instruments, and that fathers do not receive the help they need.
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • Autistic people aren’t really accepted – and it’s impacting their mental health

            https://theconversation.com/autistic...ental%20health


            While medical professionals have become much better at diagnosingautism, many people with the condition feel it is still not accepted as a potentially positive aspect of who they are. Autism is a lifelong neurodevelopmental condition, meaning that the brain develops differently. This results in differences in social communication and interactions, sensory experiences and restricted interests. For our research, we surveyed 111 cognitively able autistic adults about how their experiences of autism acceptance related to their mental health, and many commented on experiencing a negative reaction.
            I have the extreme good luck/genes to have:

            1. The high functioning type.

            2. An autistic father who was very strict re formal good manners. (I have the choice as to whether I choose to use this gift!)

            3. A neurotypical highly socially adept daughter who works with autistic adults.

            The obsessive component of the condition enabled me to overcome my learning difficulties and to resolve my dyspraxia to the extent that I was able to do sport to a reasonable level. My clinical supervisors got me to the stage where I was reasonably co ordinated on the wards and in clinic.

            A lot of aspects of ourselves are not accepted as potentially positive by others. In my opinion, if we are cognitively able adults, we should be able to learn to deal with this.
            Last edited by Jo Bowyer; 08-11-2017, 10:01 PM.
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • Psychology’s power tools

              https://aeon.co/essays/this-is-why-c...7419a-69418129

              he kept saying: ‘It is what it is.’ James must have said the phrase 10 times, and it dawned on me that he was getting at something profound. With this aphorism, he could avoid getting sucked into potentially painful emotions and instead be present and available to help his daughter.

              When I returned from Berlin, I was primed to hear the phrase everywhere I went. I am convinced I hear it at least once a day, and not only from my clients. I hear it from my wife, my friends, my colleagues, my students and, a few days ago, I heard it from the woman working the register at the gas station. I hear myself and others saying these words, but I hardly ever stop to reflect on their meaning. When it finally dawned on me to ask why everyone keeps using this phrase, the answer appeared quickly and with force: the phrase is a way to psychologically disarm powerful negative emotions. It’s an efficient means of distancing ourselves from difficult experiences, to create mental space and, potentially, to ignore – in a good way – percolating negative emotions. In short, this phrase represents what psychologists call an emotion-regulatory strategy.

              Research in clinical psychology suggests that a key aspect of maintaining our emotional health is not deepening our connection to painful thoughts – that is, not getting ‘sucked into’ thoughts about inferiority, impossibility, or seeing the potential for bad outcomes around every corner. ‘It is what it is’ reflects the decision not to go down this road and, when we use it, we’re practising one of the best therapies around. Although there are many routes to emotional equanimity, it is the thoughts in our heads, and the words we choose to express them, that are the gatekeepers of our psychological wellbeing.
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • A Walk in the Mall or Park? For Moms and Daughters, a Stroll in the Park is Best


                http://neurosciencenews.com/mom-daughter-park-7980/

                The research is based on the attention restoration theory which describes how interaction with natural environments can reduce mental fatigue and restore attentional functioning. Many studies have supported the theory, but most, if not all, previous studies have only looked at the benefits of spending time in nature on an individual’s attention.


                “Past research shows that in nature individuals’ attention is restored but we wanted to know, what does that mean for family relationships? In our theoretical model we made the case that when an individual’s attention is restored, they are less irritable, have more self-control, and are able to pick up on social cues more easily. Because of all of those dynamics, we believe they should get along better with other family members,” Izenstark explains.

                In a new study, Izenstark, now an assistant professor at San José State University, and Ebata, an associate professor and Extension specialist in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at U of I, test their theory by looking at sets of moms and daughters (ages 10-12 years) who were asked to take a walk together in nature and a walk in a mall. The researchers then tested both the mothers’ and daughters’ attention and observed their family interactions after each walk.

                The results were clear; a walk in nature increased positive interactions, helping the mothers and daughters get along better. It also restored attention, a significant effect for mothers in the study.

                “We know that both moms and daughters experience mental or attentional fatigue. It’s common especially after a full day of concentrating at work or at school,” Izenstark says. “If you think about our everyday environments, not only are you at work, but maybe your cell phone is constantly buzzing, and you’re getting emails. With all the stimuli in our everyday environments, our attention is taxed more than we realize.”

                Izenstark adds that in order to relieve some of that mental fatigue, people need to restore their directed attention. “In nature, you can relax and restore your attention which is needed to help you concentrate better. It helps your working memory.”
                The infant school I pass on my way to work has a notice on the gate which reads "Why not switch off your phone and ask your child "How was your day?"
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • How spending time in city parks helps asylum seekers to feel at home

                  https://theconversation.com/how-spen...el%20at%20home


                  Across Europe, unprecedented numbers of asylum seekers are currently waiting for a decision on their refugee status. Unable to legally work or study, and with very limited funds, many of them feel as though they’re in a state of limbo; like their lives have been put on hold.

                  With shrinking public sector funding, there are even fewer resources available to help asylum seekers in this position. But now, new researchshows that urban parks and public spaces can provide a crucial free resource to enhance asylum seekers’ well-being, and help them to integrate.

                  Our interviews with asylum seekers, support workers and park managers revealed that parks and other green spaces in the city are places where asylum seekers can gain confidence by taking part in local life, and find much needed moments of respite from hardship. Khalid, a Syrian refugee in London, said:
                  I like to see people happy. When we sit in the park we say “hello” to people. When we see someone with an Arabic face we talk to them, but we talk to anyone if they can understand our English.
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • The fear of being laughed at as additional diagnostic criterion in social anxiety disorder and avoidant personality disorder?

                    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0188024
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • Life events and hopelessness depression: The influence of affective experience

                      http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0187898
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment


                      • Radiologists detect injury patterns of intimate partner violence

                        https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1127090822.htm
                        Jo Bowyer
                        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                        Comment


                        • How the God You Worship Influences the Ghosts You See

                          http://neurosciencenews.com/ghosts-r...theology-8092/

                          Jo Bowyer
                          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                          Comment


                          • Social networking sites may be controlling your mind – here’s how to take charge

                            https://theconversation.com/social-n...0take%20charge

                            How can you live the life you want to, avoiding the distractions and manipulations of others? To do so, you need to know how you work. “Know thyself”, the Ancients urged. Sadly, we are often bad at this.

                            But by contrast, others know us increasingly well. Our intelligence, sexual orientation – and much more – can be computed from our Facebook likes. Machines, using data from our digital footprint, are better judges of our personality than our friends and family. Soon, artificial intelligence, using our social network data, will know even more. The 21st-century challenge will be how to live when others know us better than we know ourselves.

                            But how free are we today? There are industries dedicated to capturing and selling our attention – and the best bait is social networking. Facebook, Instagram and Twitter have drawn us closer round the campfire of our shared humanity. Yet, they come with costs, both personal and political. Users must decide if the benefits of these sites outweigh their costs.
                            Jo Bowyer
                            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                            Comment


                            • Women Who Attempt Suicide Exhibit Different Protein Levels Years After the Attempt

                              http://neurosciencenews.com/suicide-...genetics-8119/

                              The researchers tested plasma levels in both groups for BDNF, or brain-derived neurotropic factor, a protein found in the brain and periphery that is critical to the creation and functioning of neurons and the ability of synapses to strengthen or weaken over time. They found that women with a history of suicide attempts displayed lower circulating levels of BDNF than women with no history of suicide attempts.
                              Jo Bowyer
                              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                              Comment


                              • Shedding Light on the Voices in Our Heads

                                http://neurosciencenews.com/internal-voices-8139/

                                Previous research suggests that when we prepare to speak out loud, our brain creates a copy of the instructions that are sent to our lips, mouth and vocal cords. This copy is known as an efference-copy.

                                It is sent to the region of the brain that processes sound to predict what sound it is about to hear. This allows the brain to discriminate between the predictable sounds that we have produced ourselves, and the less predictable sounds that are produced by other people.

                                “The efference-copy dampens the brain’s response to self-generated vocalisations, giving less mental resources to these sounds, because they are so predictable,” says Associate Professor Whitford.

                                “This is why we can’t tickle ourselves.
                                Jo Bowyer
                                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                                Comment

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