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  • It’s easy to get caught up in constructing our selves, but what does it cost us?

    https://aeon.co/videos/its-easy-to-g...oes-it-cost-us
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • EG-Physio
      EG-Physio commented
      Editing a comment
      He describes the costs as 1] suffering, or the potential for same, and 2] never getting to know the real Self (awareness beyond mind).

      You know it's that same awareness which heals - the one mentioned in the 'stuck neurotag' thread. Just enter it as deeply as you can whilst gently poking the patient's sore spot.

      My experience is that you cannot easily enter awareness from a negative self polarity. There must first be a basic sense of goodness which cannot arise from external conditions. 'Fart' must become 'fragrance'.

      Buddhist and spiritually-oriented people often make the mistake of saying "the self is just a mental construct which creates the potential for suffering, therefore ignore it". But that's very dangerous. Anyone with a negative enough self-image will become anxious/depressed, or try to harm themselves. Therefore, effort must be put into creating and maintaining a positive polarity.

      Ego is not a dirty word,
      Don't you believe what you seen or you heard...
      Exercise it daily,
      And get it down on tape.
      Last edited by EG-Physio; 11-09-2017, 02:38 PM.

  • My experience is that you can't easily enter awareness from a negative self polarity.
    Who is it that enters awareness?

    Some find that a bit of decluttering helps.

    My unfortunate daughter, who might need a lift to work at 6.30 in the morning can walk in to find me alive but in a state of unadulterated awareness, vision is the first sense to emerge, it can take a while for hearing speech and movement to kick in. Several have given similar descriptions with reference to emerging from anaesthesia.


    I no longer meditate, but the decades of practice may have affected my default mode network. "Me" can take a while to reassemble. I certainly wouldn't be fit for work in that condition.




    There must first be a basic sense of goodness which cannot arise from external conditions. 'Fart' must become 'fragrance'.

    Codswallop!!

    "Goodness" isn't a basic sense, it is a descriptor of the effects of a shot of endorphins and encephalins, which has "lit the blue touch paper" in your salience networks.

    Ditch the guru, stop trying to be one yourself, save your money and read the threads, if the evidence is poor, someone usually picks up on it.

    And don't start reinterating the "limitations of science meme". I am a huge fan of Retraction Watch.
    Last edited by Jo Bowyer; 11-09-2017, 03:35 PM.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • 'Who enters awareness?' is just another non-dualist platitude. I can answer it but there's nothing to be gained.

      Basic sense/endorphin/blue torch... whatever! The thing is, if you catered to your self-image, I bet the morning fugue/semi-consciousness would stop. And my opinion is that you should aim to stop it because it can be very unpleasant (aside from that, fugue is not the same as Anatta - I made the very same error in judgment). Robbins-Blair's eyes open scripts would be perfect for you. Don't aim for an altered state (ie. don't read the induction), because you already have too much theta in your brain. Just read the suggestion(s). I'll PM you one.

      What happens in the morning is that you get a spike of beta waves (reflecting anxiety due to poor ego maintenance). This spike of electrical activity semi-wakes you whilst the slower theta waves are still in effect. So it's a horrible mix of dread and confusion at worst, and at best, semi-consciousness. Jung talked about such side effects of premature meditation practice. Easily fixed.

      Don't look a gift horse in the mouth. Very few people know this stuff.
      Last edited by EG-Physio; 11-09-2017, 04:27 PM.

      Comment


      • The thing is, if you catered to your self-image, I bet the morning fugue/semi-consciousness would stop. And my opinion is that you should aim to stop it because it can be very unpleasant
        Fugue is a rare dissociative disorder.

        It is not the same as waking up in the morning, or coming round from an anaesthetic. I have seen a couple, they didn't do well and it was beyond my capabilities to keep their chests clear. I didn't diagnose the condition, the psychiatrist did. I find it risible that you, a physiotherapist have diagnosed the condition in me over the internet. I can assure you that I went to work in both practices today, drove my car, got on and off the trains and wrote a couple of reports, all by myself! Since I got home, I have done the recycling and prevented my daughter who is old, but not wise enough to know better, from giving herself food poisoning.


        Don't look a gift horse in the mouth. Very few people know this stuff.
        Of course they do! Robbins Blair has only been in practice for 10 years, where do you think he got his ideas? Modern hypnosis has been going since the late 18th century, The USSR squad were thought to be using it in the run up to the 1956 Olympics.

        I tried hypnosis myself, along with ergogenic aids, various types of clothing, diets, you name it, in order to to try and get myself up the UK rankings in my sport. It didn't work. The only thing that did work was getting the basics right courtesy of several outstanding coaches, putting in the hours, and training with others who were equally driven.

        There are no short cuts to becoming a decent manual therapist, do the reading, treat each patient to the best of your ability, repeat.

        If you continue to post unevidenced opinion, I will continue to deconstruct it.

        Others may not be so patient.



        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • EG-Physio
          EG-Physio commented
          Editing a comment
          Self hypnosis for sports performance is different to what I was suggesting. Your defense is always to start talking about other stuff to throw me off the scent... USSR in 1956? Manual therapy short cuts? All irrelevant!

          I haven't diagnosed anything in you because there's nothing wrong with you! You described a common side effect of intensive meditation and I offered you the solution. Take it or leave it.

        • Jo Bowyer
          Jo Bowyer commented
          Editing a comment
          I stopped intensive meditation (retreats) in 1980, too busy with work and study to put in the hours.

          "The thing is, if you catered to your self-image, I bet the morning fugue/semi-consciousness would stop. And my opinion is that you should aim to stop it because it can be very unpleasant (aside from that, fugue is not the same as Anatta - I made the very same error in judgment). Robbins-Blair's eyes open scripts would be perfect for you. Don't aim for an altered state (ie. don't read the induction), because you already have too much theta in your brain. Just read the suggestion(s). I'll PM you one.

          What happens in the morning is that you get a spike of beta waves (reflecting anxiety due to poor ego maintenance). This spike of electrical activity semi-wakes you whilst the slower theta waves are still in effect. So it's a horrible mix of dread and confusion at worst, and at best, semi-consciousness. Jung talked about such side effects of premature meditation practice."


          Not only is this a diagnosis, you have sent me a prescription.
          Last edited by Jo Bowyer; 12-09-2017, 06:55 AM.

      • ‘Power Poses’ Don’t Work, Studies Suggest


        http://neurosciencenews.com/power-po...ychology-7458/

        The claim that holding a “power pose” can improve your life became wildly popular several years ago, fueling the second most-watched TED talk ever but also casting doubts about the science behind the assertion.

        Now comes the most definitive evidence to date – a wave of scientific studies spearheaded by a Michigan State University researcher – suggesting that power poses do not improve your life.

        “This new evidence joins an existing body of research questioning the claim by power pose advocates that making your body more physically expansive – such as standing with your legs spread and your hands on your hips – can actually make you more likely to succeed in life,” said Joseph Cesario, MSU associate professor of psychology.

        Cesario co-edits a scientific journal, Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology, that recently published seven studies, all of which attempted – unsuccessfully – to replicate and extend the effects of power pose research. In other words, none of the studies showed positive effects of power poses on any behavioral measure, such as how well you perform in a job interview. The studies were even reviewed by Dana Carney, a University of California Berkeley professor who was one of the authors of the original power pose research.

        In addition, Cesario and MSU graduate student David Johnson recently published four new studies testing whether holding power poses impacted important behaviors such as how well you do in a business negotiation. The work, published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science,again found no evidence that making yourself expansive mattered at all.

        “There is currently little reason to continue to strongly believe,” Cesario said, “that holding these expansive poses will meaningfully affect people’s lives, especially the lives of the low-status or powerless people.”
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • How do close relationships lead to longer life?

          https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0907093638.htm

          While recent research has shown that loneliness can play a role in early death, psychologists are also concerned with the mechanisms by which social relationships and close personal ties affect health. A special issue of American Psychologist, the flagship journal of the American Psychological Association, offers an overview of the science and makes the case for psychological scientists to work together to make close relationships a public health priority.

          "The articles in this special issue represent state-of-the-art work on the central issues in the study of close relationships and health. They draw from relationship science and health psychology, two areas of scientific inquiry with independent histories and distinct domains," special issue editor Christine Dunkel Schetter, PhD, wrote in the introduction. "The goal of this special issue is to bridge the gap between these two specialties to improve the quality and usefulness of future research and practice."

          Articles focus on topics including how healthy relationships early in life affect physical and mental health in childhood and beyond; the role of intimate relationships in coronary heart disease; the need to focus on partners when treating someone with chronic disease; and the increasingly complex biological pathways involved linking relationships to health.
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • Medial prefrontal cortical thinning mediates shifts in other-regarding preferences during adolescence


            https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08692-6


            Abstract


            Adolescence is a time of significant cortical changes in the ‘social brain’, a set of brain regions involved in sophisticated social inference. However, there is limited evidence linking the structural changes in social brain to development of social behavior. The present study investigated how cortical development of the social brain relates to other-regarding behavior, in the context of fairness concerns. Participants aged between 9 to 23 years old responded to multiple rounds of ultimatum game proposals. The degree to which each participant considers fairness of intention (i.e., intention-based reciprocity) vs. outcome (i.e., egalitarianism) was quantified using economic utility models. We observed a gradual shift in other-regarding preferences from simple rule-based egalitarianism to complex intention-based reciprocity from early childhood to young adulthood. The preference shift was associated with cortical thinning of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and posterior temporal cortex. Meta-analytic reverse-inference analysis showed that these regions were involved in social inference. Importantly, the other-regarding preference shift was statistically mediated by cortical thinning in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Together these findings suggest that development of the ability to perform sophisticated other-regarding social inference is associated with the structural changes of specific social brain regions in late adolescence.
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • I read the news today


              By NOI Group,

              https://noijam.com/2017/09/14/i-read-the-news-today/



              While medical advances in screening and treatment have led to more women surviving breast cancer — with nearly 3 million survivors in the U.S. alone — complications such as severe and ongoing pain, swelling and limited mobility can persist.

              The researchers hope to better understand the impact of breast cancer treatments on body image, pain, quality of life, function, sensation, and nerve sensitivity in the upper limbs. They are exploring if breast cancer survivors experience the same perceptual changes as previous research has shown affect some people with longstanding hand or arm pain — specifically the difficulty in recognizing the laterality (left from right) of a picture of their affected body part.

              “We’re looking at signs that women’s brains are rewiring,” says Dr. Boyd. He notes that while persistent pain has recently been associated with changes in the brain and nervous system, some breast cancer survivors have reported a sensory loss or “change in ownership” of their breast, arm, hand or other affected body part following diagnosis and treatment.

              “We are trying to explore the relationship between breast cancer treatments and changes in body image associated with ongoing pain and disability,” he says.

              The researchers are recruiting women 18 years or older who have completed treatment for unilateral breast cancer as well as women with no history of the disease for comparison purposes. The requirements include:

              -For an in-person study of the effect of breast cancer treatment in nerve sensitivity over time, participants who have completed treatment one to three months prior to enrollment attend three two-hour exams (each six months apart) to explore sensation and arm mobility.

              -For an in-person study of the effects of breast cancer treatment on nerve mobility, participants who have completed treatment one to three months prior to enrollment attend a one-and-a-half-hour exam using ultrasound imaging during common wrist movements.

              -For an online study of the effects of breast cancer treatment on body perception, participants who have completed treatment within one month to 5 years prior to enrollment complete a short computer survey.

              Women interested in learning more or participating in the research, which is strictly confidential, should click here or contact Dr. Boyd at bboyd1@samuelmerritt.edu.
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • Expressive Writing Cools Brain on Stressful Tasks for Worriers

                http://neurosciencenews.com/worriers...-writing-7487/

                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • The brain basis of “hatred of sound:” Misophonia

                  http://blogs.plos.org/neuro/2017/06/...s-1709-neuroup

                  5499502593_84981c67d2_z-640x320.jpg

                  Known as "tokking" amongst my brothers, who use it to drive me up the wall.
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • The role of neurabins in affective disorders

                    http://blogs.plos.org/neuro/2017/07/...s-1709-neuroup

                    Affective-disorders.png
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • Magnetic fields to alleviate anxiety

                      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0915165219.htm

                      It is possible to unlearn fears. And this works even better when a specific region of the brain has previously been stimulated magnetically. This has been shown by researchers from the Würzburg University Hospital in a new study.
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment


                      • Neuroanatomical correlates of forgiving unintentional harms


                        https://www.nature.com/articles/srep45967

                        Abstract


                        Mature moral judgments rely on the consideration of a perpetrator’s mental state as well as harmfulness of the outcomes produced. Prior work has focused primarily on the functional correlates of how intent information is neurally represented for moral judgments, but few studies have investigated whether individual differences in neuroanatomy can also explain variation in moral judgments. In the current study, we conducted voxel-based morphometry analyses to address this question. We found that local grey matter volume in the left anterior superior temporal sulcus, a region in the functionally defined theory of mind or mentalizing network, was associated with the degree to which participants relied on information about innocent intentions to forgive accidental harms. Our findings provide further support for the key role of mentalizing in the forgiveness of accidental harms and contribute preliminary evidence for the neuroanatomical basis of individual differences in moral judgments.

                        Introduction


                        When humans make moral judgments, one critical input is information about intent. Did she spill the hot coffee on her colleague on purpose? Did he step on his competitor’s foot by accident? Similarly, the common law tradition relies on presence of culpable mental states (mens rea) for criminal conviction. Much recent work in moral psychology and cognitive neuroscience has explored the psychological and neurofunctional basis of intent processing for moral judgment. In the current study, we extend this literature by exploring the neuroanatomical correlates of this process. Behavioral work shows that when intent and outcome information conflict, people primarily rely on information about intent, an effect observed in older children and adults across cultures1,2,3. Representations of others’ mental states are constructed by Theory of Mind (ToM) or mentalizing, the process of inferring representational content (e.g., beliefs, desires, knowledge, intentions) from observing others’ in order to explain and predict their behavior4,5. This capacity is neurally implemented in a specific network consisting primarily of the bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ), ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), temporal poles (TP), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PC/PCC)4.
                        Jo Bowyer
                        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                        Comment




                        • Is the sky really blue? Some hunter-gatherers don’t describe colors the same way most people do

                          http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/...et_cid=1552409
                          The differences between the Tsimane’ language and Spanish or English come from the fact that the Tsimane’ and other hunter-gatherers don’t need to describe as many colors in the course of their daily routines. The languages of industrialized cultures have more identical objects to describe: We need to be able to distinguish the blue coffee cup from the green one, or the red car from the yellow car. Therefore a more expansive color vocabulary than seen in hunter-gatherer cultures developed, according to Conway and Gibson.

                          Color descriptions between languages aren’t different because people see different things, Gibson explains. Color vocabularies are different across cultures because those cultures need different things from language. “We see the same colors as hunter-gatherers,” he says, “but they don’t need to label those colors.”

                          Another reason that people in industrialized cultures have a more developed language for color has to do with the ability to make choices, says Debi Roberson, a cognitive psychologist at the University of Essex in the United Kingdom who has studied color vocabulary among the indigenous people of Namibia and Papua New Guinea. “We live in a manufactured environment where we can choose what color our clothes, or anything else, are” she says. “If you live in a natural environment, you have absolutely no control over color whatsoever.”
                          Jo Bowyer
                          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                          Comment


                          • Mechanisms of cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder involve robust and extensive increases in brain network connectivity

                            http://www.nature.com/tp/journal/v7/...p2017192a.html
                            Jo Bowyer
                            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                            Comment

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