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Could we do more with the foot?

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  • #16
    Thanks Rick,

    I have just had a quick flick through the blog. The posting of 18.08.14 deals with plantar cutaneous feedback and ankle instability.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • #17
      The association between toe grip strength and osteoarthritis of the knee in Japanese women: A multicenter cross-sectional study


      http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0186454

      Abstract


      We evaluated the relationship between altered foot function and knee osteoarthritis through a specific comparison of toe grip strength in older women with and without knee osteoarthritis. Participants were 120 women with knee osteoarthritis (OA group) and 108 healthy community-dwelling women with no history of knee pain and lower limb surgery (control group). The following factors and outcome variables were included in our analysis: measured toe grip strength, isometric knee extension strength, the timed Up-and-Go, and the WOMAC scale. Between-group differences were compared using unpaired t-tests for descriptive characteristics and outcome measures. Pearson’s correlation coefficients between toe grip strength and age, body mass index, and other outcome measures were calculated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the independence of toe grip strength and knee osteoarthritis. Compared to the control group, participants in the OA group were older, heavier, and had a higher body mass index. Toe grip strength and isometric knee extension strength were lower and the timed Up-and-Go longer for the OA group than the control group. Toe grip strength was correlated with age negatively and isometric knee extension strength positively in the OA group and to age and the timed Up-and-Go negatively, and isometric knee extension strength positively in the control group. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that body mass index, isometric knee extensor strength, and toe grip strength were independently associated with knee osteoarthritis. Our findings indicate a probable association between altered forefoot function and the incidence or progression of knee osteoarthritis. Increasing toe grip strength might provide a practical intervention for patients with knee osteoarthritis.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • #18
        Reported selection criteria for adult acquired flatfoot deformity and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: Are they one and the same? A systematic review


        http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0187201

        Abstract

        Background


        Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) and adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD) are used interchangeably, although both suggest quite different pathological processes.

        Objective


        To investigate key differences in selection criteria used for inclusion into research studies.

        Methods


        An electronic database search was performed from inception to June 2016. All primary research articles with clear inclusion/diagnostic criteria for PTTD or AAFD were included in the review. All criteria were extracted and synthesised into one aggregate list. Frequencies of recurring criteria were calculated and reported for each stage of the conditions.

        Results


        Of the potentially eligible papers, 148 (65%) did not specify inclusion/selection criteria for PTTD or AAFD and were excluded. Eligibility criteria were reported 82 times in the 80 included papers, with 69 descriptions for PTTD and 13 for AAFD. After synthesis of criteria from all papers, there were 18 key signs and symptoms. Signs and symptoms were considered to be those relating to tendon pathology and those relating to structural deformity. The total number of individual inclusion/diagnostic criteria ranged from 2 to 9. The majority of articles required signs of both tendon dysfunction and structural deformity (84% for AAFD and 81% for PTTD). Across both groups, the most frequently reported criteria were abduction of the forefoot (11.5% of total criteria used), the presence of a flexible deformity (10.2%) and difficulty performing a single leg heel raise (10.0%). This was largely the case for the PTTD articles, whereas the AAFD articles were more focused on postural issues such as forefoot abduction, medial arch collapse, and hindfoot valgus (each 16.7%).

        Conclusion


        As well as synthesising the available literature and providing reporting recommendations, this review has identified that many papers investigating PTTD/AAFD do not state condition-specific selection criteria and that this limits their clinical applicability. Key signs and symptoms of PTTD and AAFD appear similar, except in early PTTD where no structural deformity is present. We recommend that PTTD is the preferred terminology for the condition associated with signs of local tendon dysfunction with pain and/or swelling along the tendon and difficulty with inversion and/or single leg heel raise characterising stage I and difficulty with single leg heel raise and a flexible flatfoot deformity characterizing stage II PTTD. While AAFD may be useful as an umbrella term for acquired flatfoot deformities, the specific associated aetiology should be reported in studies to aid consolidation and implementation of research into practice.
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • #19
          Does hallux valgus impair physical function?

          https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biome...891-018-2100-0


          Hallux valgus (HV) is one of the most common foot deformities in adults; it is characterized by abnormal angulation, rotation, and lateral deviation of the hallux at the first metatarsophalangeal joint [1]. The prevalence of HV has been reported as 58% in adult women and 25% in adult men (HV angle ≥15°) in the USA [2], 28.4% in adults (self-reported hallux valgus) in the UK [3], 64.7% (HV angle ≥15°) in a Korean population aged between 40 and 69 years [4], and 29.8% (HV angle > 20°) in a Japanese population aged over 65 years [5]. While HV is basically regarded as a structural deformity, there is debate surrounding the association between abnormal foot structure and related disability. Several studies have found no association between HV and disability, such as the Timed Up & Go test [6], walking speed [6, 7, 8], and balance tests [8]. On the other hand, increasing HV severity has been shown to negatively impact health-related quality of life and self-reported function [4, 9, 10], and HV has been linked to balance function [11] and increased fall risk in older adults [12, 13].

          Our cohort study started in 1997 to investigate the epidemiology of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) [14, 15] and osteoporosis [16]. The study of HV started from 2009, and we reported the prevalence and risk factors for HV [5]. In our study [5], HV showed a significant relationship with KOA. In general, KOA is associated with lower physical extremity function [17]. However, no report has shown a relationship between HV and physical function after taking into account the existence of KOA.

          The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether HV affects physical function after taking into account KOA among elderly persons.
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • #20
            Cranio-caudal and medio-lateral navicular translation are representative surrogate measures of foot function in asymptomatic adults during walking

            https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0208175

            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment

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