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  • Ebola in the DRC: expert sets out critical lessons learnt in Liberia

    https://theconversation.com/ebola-in...20in%20Liberia

    First, health care workers are being infected. In our experience in Liberia, and in most outbreaks, infected health care workers can be super spreaders. They can infect the people they treat or those taking care of the sick.

    Second, there are now cases (live and dead) reported in communities that were not on the contact list. This is a list of people that may have come into contact with an infected person. If there are people that are infected who weren’t on the list, it means that proper tracking isn’t happening. It also implies that people don’t trust, or are afraid, of the ebola response and are turning to home treatments, including traditional remedies or prayers. These could expose a larger population to infection.

    To contain an ebola outbreak, it’s crucial that 100% of the contact list is documented and tracked. If this is broken, then a spread should be expected.

    Why has the country been unable to contain the spread this time round?

    The failure to control this outbreak is due to a variety of factors.

    Because of the civil war and with huge numbers of people living in abject poverty – as was the case in Liberia – there is widespread distrust in the government and its institutions. This means it will be hard for people to trust the Ebola response team.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

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    • Why Ebola is proving hard to beat in the DRC

      https://theconversation.com/why-ebol...in%20the%20DRC
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • Protecting those on the frontline from Ebola

        https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0202171849.htm

        Ebola virus is very easily contracted from body fluids -- a mere ten viral particles will do it -- and people who get it have up to a 78 percent chance of dying. Health care workers are among the most vulnerable.
        This training package aims to reduce the number of critical errors and risky actions committed when treating an Ebola patient. Critical errors put an individual at risk of infection or contaminate the clean zone. Risky actions increase the chance of committing a critical error.
        These scenarios included cleaning up spills, putting on a biosuit correctly and properly responding to a needle stick. Practicing all of these scenarios helps to reduce the risk of infection of the health care workers treating the Ebola patient.
        Biosuits were not available when I was working in barrier and reverse barrier nursing situations in the 1970s and '80s. I had several needle sticks due to overworked phlebotomists failing to wait until I had finished before starting their work, and I was advised to wait and see if I developed symptoms! This would not happen in today's NHS and hepatitis now has several subcategories.
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

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        • Congo’s Ebola outbreak is a testing ground for new treatments

          https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-newsletter-v2

          The antibody treatments “basically jump-start the immune system to have an immediate presence of antibodies directed against the virus,” Davey says. One, called mAb114, was cloned from a sample taken from an Ebola survivor 11 years after the person’s infection in 1995. This treatment targets a protein on the surface of the Ebola virus and somehow hampers the virus’ entry into cells. All macaques given a lethal dose of Ebola and treated with mAb114 survived even when the drug was administered five days after infection, researchers reported in Science in 2016.
          I had hoped from the start of this thread that I would eventually post something hopeful! Of course, once this is under control, another deadly disease will emerge. Survivors of once deadly disease are sometimes left with NMSK sequelae, which require decades of management by Rheumatology teams.
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment

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