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  • Tip Are things getting hot on twitter?

    Are things getting hot on twitter?

    Yeah, dfjpt is me. Versus the entire Canadian mesodermal mindset, maybe.
    Somebody HighUp in the Canadian manual therapy black belt system wrote a piece on fascial release, and I question it.
    So now it's become some kind of "thing" apparently..
    OkyDoky then.

    People have wondered for years why I've always placed such emphasis on ectoderm/mesoderm differentiation. This is why. Because it's important.
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

  • #2
    Amazing. You have alot of patience dealing with clowns like that.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Diane!

      Something else I recall from Reinl's book:

      "Sometimes tradition, familiarity, and/or ease of use trumps "better."

      Maybe this partly explains the aggressive push-back you're getting.

      Comment


      • #4
        Totally.
        There is very little one can do to dint it - it's its own culture.
        Diane
        www.dermoneuromodulation.com
        SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
        HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
        Neurotonics PT Teamblog
        Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
        Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
        @PainPhysiosCan
        WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
        @WCPTPTPN
        Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

        @dfjpt
        SomaSimple on Facebook
        @somasimple

        "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

        “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

        “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

        "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

        "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Diane!

          Telling wise manual therapists to appreciate the CNS is lecturing birds how to fly.
          This twitter response made me think of the recent thread where I discussed Jon Haddan's take on man's attempt to duplicate the flight of birds by mimicking their actions:

          "It certainly made sense from observing flight to think that the downward flapping of flexible wings created a downward vertical force that was essential (and the only way) to create vertical lift and flight."

          But on this we were wrong.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Diane!

            I've really enjoyed your questioning in that twitter exchange. You're asking very good questions in a professional, collegial manner...

            and the response:

            does it really matter to a clinician? Others figure out why it works later

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by proud
              The popular manual therapy series in Canada (:zip tend to honestly believe they understand that pain is an output....yet they still make comments like that Bregg character.

              Any discussions I've had with ortho black belts in Canada have been astonishingly underwhelming. Many seem so oblivious that they don't even know that they are...indeed....oblivious.

              It's truly a fortress of goblettykook.

              Good luck with that.
              What has surprised me in one way (but makes total sense in another way) is the fierceness with which the ortho in Canada has embraced and now defends myofascial release (sic) as a "Thing."

              Back in the day, in the early eighties, it seemed to me that ortho thought "soft tissue" anything was too girly to bear. It was all about learning the important cracking secrets, keeping them safe while dispensing them out through a structured series of courses. All ortho courses were in preparation for the real deal, which was grade fiving every joint in the body. The standard mentality in those days was that all pain came from joints. I bailed early from all that, disgusted with the attitude.

              Now, thirty years later, it looks like they are preaching that pain comes from fascia. It has to do with nociceptors or something. Do they think that they can move fascia, with bare hands, and somehow simultaneously turn off the nociceptors or something? Doesn't make any sense. ANY. Not a pick. As soon as nociceptors (which are silent until activated by inflammatory processes in the periphery, i.e., peripheral sensitization) become activated, they start to be sensitive to mechanical stimulation. As soon as they are sensitized to mechanical stimulation, you're only going to aggravate the entire "pain" system in the spinal cord. Which would be stupid, right? If it were true. Which it is not. Which is a good thing.

              So one can only conclude these people have not thought things through, are so clouded by their preferred operator-model mode of conducting their business, with all the built-in fallacies that come with it, that they are inattentionally blind to the gorilla.

              Found a new word for this in Wikipedia: Conspicuity.
              Conspicuity refers to an object's ability to catch a person's attention. When something is conspicuous it is easily visible. There are two factors which determine conspicuity: sensory conspicuity and cognitive conspicuity. Sensory conspicuity factors are the physical properties an object has. If an item has bright colors, flashing lights, high contrast with environment, or other attention-grabbing physical properties it can attract a person’s attention much easier. For example, people tend to notice objects that are bright colors or crazy patterns before they notice other objects. Cognitive conspicuity factors pertain to objects that are familiar to someone. People tend to notice objects faster if they have some meaning to their lives. For example, when a person hears his/her name, their attention is drawn to the person who said it. The cocktail party effect describes the cognitive conspicuity factor as well. When an object isn’t conspicuous, it is easier to be intentionally blind to it. People tend to notice items if they capture their attention in some way. If the object isn’t visually prominent or relevant, there is a higher chance that a person will miss it.
              Maybe I should write a play that contains a gorilla, to illustrate how far up it's own behind, my profession is, in Canada.

              [YT]z-Dg-06nrnc[/YT]
              Diane
              www.dermoneuromodulation.com
              SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
              HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
              Neurotonics PT Teamblog
              Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
              Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
              @PainPhysiosCan
              WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
              @WCPTPTPN
              Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

              @dfjpt
              SomaSimple on Facebook
              @somasimple

              "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

              “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

              “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

              "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

              "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Diane View Post


                Maybe I should write a play that contains a gorilla, to illustrate how far up it's own behind, my profession is, in Canada.
                If you do, can I play the gorilla.

                On a serious note, I agree with your sentiments regarding to state of affairs in Canada. All job advertisements seem to want "advanced manual therapy skills", or offer "mentoring from expert manual therapists", state that "IMS or acupuncture skills preferred". "New grads welcome to apply"....who can then get indoctrinated in the same dated model. :sad:

                I just don't see positive change occurring any time soon.

                I'm pessimistic today.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The IgnitePhysio people have made it into a slideshow now.
                  Diane
                  www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                  SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                  HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                  Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                  @PainPhysiosCan
                  WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                  @WCPTPTPN
                  Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                  @dfjpt
                  SomaSimple on Facebook
                  @somasimple

                  "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                  “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                  “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                  "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                  "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Diane!

                    The IgnitePhysio people have made it into a slideshow now.
                    What scares me even more is that this stuff has trickled down and taken deep root among the coaching community. That's where I first encountered the previously unknown ability of fascia. So now at my seminars I get strange looks if I even question fascia as what I consider an illusionary approach to pain treatment.

                    But power of fascia seems here to stay.

                    Pretty soon fascia will be tweeting on its own....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If fascia and zombies were to ever meet up and have children, the world as we know it will end for sure.

                      Instead of moaning for braaaaaainz, they'd moan for faaaaaaaaaaasciaaaaaaaaaaahhh.

                      Oh. Wait a minute. That may have already happened.
                      Diane
                      www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                      SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                      HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                      Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                      @PainPhysiosCan
                      WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                      @WCPTPTPN
                      Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                      @dfjpt
                      SomaSimple on Facebook
                      @somasimple

                      "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                      “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                      “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                      "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                      "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My blogpost rebuttal : Why language matters "Avoiding Stupidity is Easier than Seeking Brilliance"
                        Diane
                        www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                        SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                        HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                        Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                        Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                        Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                        @PainPhysiosCan
                        WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                        @WCPTPTPN
                        Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                        @dfjpt
                        SomaSimple on Facebook
                        @somasimple

                        "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                        “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                        “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                        "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                        "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi Diane!

                          Enjoyed the blogpost!

                          Cognitive conspicuity factors pertain to objects that are familiar to someone. People tend to notice objects faster if they have some meaning to their lives. For example, when a person hears his/her name, their attention is drawn to the person who said it.
                          That is so true. Throughout the season, when ANY high school kids says, "hey coach," I immediately turn to that young man or woman. Most of the time I'm not the coach they are calling, but it's impossible for me not to react.

                          Of course, if someone says "hey A-hole," I also turn to the person who said it. Most of the time, it is me they are referring to....:teeth:

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by proud
                            The current of scientific knowledge is very powerful and should be guiding us to shore's safety.... yet the Canadian ortho stream seems determined to row their boats against the current out to deeper, dangerous waters.

                            It seems they embrace pseudo-science in some odd desire to seem "special".

                            Here's an idea for them: Work backwards from a scientific premise and see where that lands "fascia" and our ability to model it like a lump of clay...

                            Geeshh. # 21st century.....

                            The younger generation (gee, I never thought I'd live to see the day I would use that phrase.. :sad don't seem to know how to think, period, let alone from different directions, like backwards. They will fit well with cars with no steering wheels that drive themselves.
                            Diane
                            www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                            SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                            HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                            Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                            Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                            Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                            @PainPhysiosCan
                            WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                            @WCPTPTPN
                            Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                            @dfjpt
                            SomaSimple on Facebook
                            @somasimple

                            "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                            “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                            “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                            "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                            "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Diane View Post
                              The younger generation (gee, I never thought I'd live to see the day I would use that phrase.. :sad don't seem to know how to think, period, let alone from different directions, like backwards. They will fit well with cars with no steering wheels that drive themselves.
                              This is well put Diane but also extremely dis-heartening. I recall when I applied to Physiotherapy there where 500+ applicants for 32 seats.

                              Now....less than 125 for 48 seats.

                              Can you guess why?

                              we are the lowest paid health care profession in the system at the moment (below dieticians, social workers etc etc). Even recreation therapists are edging closer and closer in pay within provincial governments...

                              So who in their right minds would choose such a lousy paid profession?

                              And why are we paid so poorly?

                              Because we have gone the way of pseudo-science and most people (including those on control of the public purse) know it.

                              I blame the Canadian ortho stream for a large part of the dumbing down of our profession and subsequently dragging down the profession in Canada writ large.

                              We apparently hold "science" degrees yet we have these fools rabbiting on about how we can mold fascia...

                              We have a much dumber generation of Physiotherapists upon us because the applicants are becoming more and more sparse...

                              We have only ourselves to blame.

                              Well...those who opted to turn in their brains for pseudo-science...Like this Fascia person whom you are attempting to enlighten.

                              And she' old....so should have educated herself somewhere along the way. But .....nope.
                              Last edited by proud; 12-06-2014, 10:57 PM.

                              Comment

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