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  • Dr Pat Buchanan (PT, PhD) recently completed the following survey. The results may be of interest and explain why GCFPs are thin on the ground

    United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais Teachers: a survey of characteristics and practice patterns

    Tl;dr


    US based survey
    Number of respondents (n): 392 (of 1287 in FGNA?)
    Mean age: 55.7 years;
    Gender: 83% female (n=325)

    Other health credentials:
    (A) Conventional health care credentials: 36.9%
    (B) CAM credentials: 23.1%

    (note: based on Pat's previous research, A is predominantly comprised of PT's and OT's and B of LMTs etc)

    Earnings:
    45% (n=176) of respondents earned 20% or less of total income from FM practice
    20% (n=79) earned 80% or more of total income from FM practice.
    Mean: 43% (+/- 39.3%) of income from FM prax.


    Typical client demographics
    "Most" saw <10 students/week for individual lessons and <10 students/week for group lessons.

    Profile of typical client:
    Female (71.1% of the time)

    Aged: 45-64 years old.
    The primary reason students sought Feldenkrais: pain.
    EDIT: There are actually some intriguing comments / stats uncovered in Pat's research (such as % of prax. who've integrated FM into other practices, comments from PTs etc). It's worth reading and pondering on

    EDIT 2:

    Our responders reported that pain was the leading reason that students sought their services.

    Within the pain group, the primary location of pain was the back. Pain [35] and specifically back pain [1,26,29] were top reasons for seeking CAM services in other reports.

    Subsequently, reasons cited for seeking lessons focused increasingly on non-pain concerns.

    More commonly reported reasons included neurological conditions, recovery from injurysurgery-trauma, health-wellness, mobility, and balance-posture. This pattern is similar to that reported in a study of CAM providers that included Feldenkrais Teachers [35]. Although
    there is very little evidence of adverse effects from Feldenkrais lessons [3], research should
    examine the safety of this somatic learning method.

    Research supporting the effectiveness of the Feldenkrais Method for the cited reasons is broad yet relatively limited compared to more widely used interventions [3]. However, there are multiple studies supporting effectiveness for people who come for Feldenkrais lessons to improve pain [11,36,37] and particularly back pain [13,14], and improve balance [8-10].

    Given that 1) Feldenkrais students were mostly 45 years and older, 2) people in this age
    range account for a disproportionate amount of health care costs [2] and 3) falls in seniors are
    a serious contributor to nonfatal and fatal injuries [38], Feldenkrais Teachers may be well
    positioned to offer effective health promotion interventions to impact back pain and enhance
    balance.

    Appropriately designed studies could determine if Feldenkrais lessons that improve balance in turn reduce the risk of falls.
    Last edited by Dan84; 02-07-2014, 07:59 PM.
    Dan
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    • I was informed that the following book - The Intelligence of Moving Bodies by Carl Ginsberg was 'right up my ally'. I generally don't like to recommend titles before I read them myself, but I'm intrigued in this instance.



      Look at the cover of this book. What do you see if anything? There is an image here that many people will not see on first viewing. It is simply not perceived. If you spend some time without trying to figure out what the image is, you probably will not see it. But if you contemplate quietly letting the pattern sink in, the image may suddenly become clear. In the book there will be a resolution of the image, which will help you organize the image. Once you see it, it will be hard to lose it again. In other words perceptual learning can be very rapid. It
      does not require repeated going over the process.

      This is a strange phenomenon compared to what we think learning entails. Watch a baby suddenly learn a new pattern of moving such as rolling over or rolling up to sit. Sudden success makes a strong input. The pattern becomes available for the baby to begin to act in completely new ways.

      In this book we explore these phenomena and ask questions. What does the fact that we are autonomous self-moving biological creatures have to do with learning to perceive and become mature? How can we recover our functioning after injury or illness? How can we continue to improve our ability to act? Movement is not just an adjunct to being human.

      In the words of Moshe Feldenkrais, who inspired us through his profound teaching about how to know ourselves: “Movement is the key to life.” Exploring movement with attending and listening to ourselves brings us to a higher awareness of ourselves, and our surroundings. We find even as adults that we can continue to learn and increase our brain’s capacity.

      Moshe Feldenkrais was teaching that before scientists began to study these seemingly newly discovered capacities based on the phenomena of brain plasticity and coordination dynamics. Today science is catching up with the pioneers of the somatic practices. That is the theme and message of this book.
      Book outline here and review here.

      And if anyone can see what that pictures is...please for the love of God, throw me a clue here

      EDIT: Thanks to Jamie, who clued me in.
      Last edited by Dan84; 06-07-2014, 08:35 PM.
      Dan
      Tactile Raconteur

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      • Originally posted by Dan84 View Post
        I was informed that the following book - The Intelligence of Moving Bodies by Carl Ginsberg was 'right up my ally'. I generally don't like to recommend titles before I read them myself, but I'm intrigued in this instance.





        Book outline here and review here.

        And if anyone can see what that pictures is...please for the love of God, throw me a clue here

        EDIT: Thanks to Jamie, who clued me in.
        Thanks for our little exchange, Dan!

        http://youtu.be/6pYWLhAUuNE

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        • What's funny is that Carl's description is totally accurate; once found, it is very easy to find again. Talk about the elusive obvious...
          Dan
          Tactile Raconteur

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          • Firstly, thank you all so much for this thread, I've been long intrigued by the Feldenkrais work and had considered the training but had been unable to find little information that wasn't marketing. This is exactly the sort of discussion I was looking for.

            A question, early on this was mentioned:

            originally posted by mpnyo
            After MF died, the Guild promoted some of these junior students to Trainers (conveniently, the guild was created by these junior students...). The Guild then used the service marks to block people like Mia Segal and some of the other Israeli trainers from running independent trainings in North America. So they generally stayed in Europe and Israel.
            Summary: The original guild trainers here in North America were junior students who used legal obstacles to carve out a market for themselves. They were not appointed my Moshe because of their competence. They based their original trainings on a format that was untested in its ability to produce competent practitioners.
            Does this mean that the quality of teaching in Europe and Israel is generally better, or does it suffer with the same issues?

            Does anyone know of any Feldenkrais practitioners in the UK that are worth checking out?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by ajlamiman View Post
              Does this mean that the quality of teaching in Europe and Israel is generally better, or does it suffer with the same issues?
              At this point, I don't think geography is a useful way to define quality; there are good and bad FM prax. everywhere.

              You'd probably be better off looking at who's on the teaching staff for that particular training and then finding out 'are these people good trainers?'.

              If you have a training in mind, feel free to PM me and I will tell you what I know, if I know it


              Does anyone know of any Feldenkrais practitioners in the UK that are worth checking out?
              Sorry, I'm not really up to speed with the UK scene - though I've always liked Scott Clark's articles.

              I've interacted a few times with Victoria Worsley and Maggie Burrows and they both seem like sincere, competant people.

              I'll let them know about this thread / invite them here to get in touch with you
              Dan
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              • Originally posted by Dan84 View Post
                At this point, I don't think geography is a useful way to define quality; there are good and bad FM prax. everywhere.
                Thanks for clarifying Dan. The previous quote seemed to suggest the American contingent had a combination of least exposure and highest number of students, I just wondered if that had had a noticeable impact on quality.

                Thanks for those names as well I'll look into them.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by ajlamiman View Post
                  Thanks for clarifying Dan. The previous quote seemed to suggest the American contingent had a combination of least exposure and highest number of students, I just wondered if that had had a noticeable impact on quality.
                  Hard to say, because of comparative numbers. These days, most of the trainers in trainings are from the American contingent...so the effects (good and bad) are likely felt worldwide.

                  There are certainly some of the original 13 that have kept themselves to themselves - Ruthy, Mia, Yochinan etc. They're generally well regarded but we don't hear about their graduates particularly much; maybe a language/cultural thing?

                  Ryan Nagy writes quite a bit on these topics (including the hoops one needs to jump through to become an official trainer). But - as he rightly points out - there are those who go their own way.

                  (oddly, they seem to replicate most of the training structures / methodologies. If it we're me, I'd try doing something different).

                  It's a good question you ask though; is the prax. attrition rate / quality related to trainer quality, training format, intake process or something else? More to the point, how might a prospective trainee navigate that to best advantage?
                  Last edited by Dan84; 10-07-2014, 08:02 PM.
                  Dan
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                  • I wasn't sure where to post this.
                    Just watched it and thought it was worth sharing the commentary is fantastic (IMO!).

                    Comment


                    • Given the recent buzz re: somasimple and Barrett on the FPAW FB page (my fault: I was commending Todd Hargrove for his comments here, reminded me that we (in the FM community) haven't done the best job in explaining the reasons behind what we do to a professional audience. I'm sure there are lots of reasons (historical and personal).

                      To offset the close-source nature of things a little, I thought to share the following talk / presentation from the recent Feldenkrais Guild Conference. It's long - and I doubt many will watch it all the way through, though even 5-10 minutes might start to whet your appetite and give a glimpse in FM thinking/reasoning.

                      Note: there's some chat at the start, so feel free to skip to 5:00 onwards

                      [YT]A1So2w520XU[/YT]
                      Last edited by Dan84; 17-12-2014, 06:36 PM.
                      Dan
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                      • FWIW, it seems as if the FGNA has links to their quarterly public newsletter Senseability, which bills itself as "A newsletter of applications of the Feldenkrais Method of somatic education".

                        Issue 63 and Issue 64 seem to touch on the brain.
                        Last edited by Dan84; 30-12-2014, 10:56 PM.
                        Dan
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                        • Firstly, let me state that I am flabbergasted that this thread has had over 30,000 views. If the Feldenkrais community is ever in doubt that there is interested in our method, please look at the stats for this thread.

                          With that in mind: the International Feldenkrais Federation has recently made available snippets from Moshe's original American trainings on Youtube. If you ever wondered how Moshe talked, thought and taught his method - it's on Youtube (finally!)

                          Here's a few -

                          [yt]Neo5a8AYXKA[/yt]

                          [yt]EVVo1YfQpAA[/yt]

                          [yt]R2WdXBFsM3Q[/yt]

                          [yt]yswLRT23jdk[/yt]

                          More here

                          In other news: seeing this thread began with a discussion on FM trainings...I'm happy to announce that there are *major* shake ups in the works, that will hopefully see the completion of training be separated from licencing to practice (among other things). There are some major implications in this, including increased accountability placed on trainers to produce competent prax, the possibility of new training formats, open sourcing etc. More on that here
                          Last edited by Dan84; 23-01-2015, 04:32 PM.
                          Dan
                          Tactile Raconteur

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                          • Thanks Dan.

                            I spent four days in Feldenkrais' presence in 1980 and I've had more than just a few Guild members at my courses since over the decades.

                            It's 2015.
                            Barrett L. Dorko

                            Comment


                            • 2015 already? What can I say? Generational change takes a long time and there are only so many rabble-rousers to go around
                              Dan
                              Tactile Raconteur

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                              • Originally posted by Dan84 View Post
                                Ryan Nagy writes quite a bit on these topics (including the hoops one needs to jump through to become an official trainer).

                                I happened across this pdf while doing some Feldy research. I thought it might be useful to piggy-back the info here.

                                Compiled Responses to NATAB Questions sent out on September 16, 2013
                                http://www.feldenkrais.com/Files/dow...2013_NATAB.pdf

                                More information on the NATAB can be found here.



                                C.O. ( gender: ) - LMT, BS(Anatomy), DC
                                Music Fog... pick a song to listen to... you can't go wrong.
                                Need relaxation samples for your office? I have made a Deep Relaxation Massage Music Pandora Station and have others that may also be useful - about 8 massage music stations and about 49 other nifty options.

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