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  • More about "barefoot" running

    I thought sure that this article would generate some discussion here.
    Barrett L. Dorko

  • #2
    Running bare or minimal is the champion assumption that running bare will have you change your running biomechanic and that this change will turn in benefits in painfull conditions or in prevention of them.

    It also makes the assumption that you need to run barefoot or to wear minimal footware to not heel strike. It sound obvious now that changing your footwear won't make the change automatic. Then why not keep the normal shoes and instruct runners to try a mid foot attack making the transition more secure.

    That is, if a transition really prooves to be benificial in the end for preventing injuries or minimizing pain in runners. I could'nt be less sure of it.
    Frédéric Wellens, pht
    «We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the tone of voice in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.»
    «
    Those who cannot understand how to put their thoughts on ice should not enter into the heat of debate.
    »
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    www.physioaxis.ca
    chroniquesdedouleur blog

    Comment


    • #3
      It's not the shoes or lack thereof. It's what the runner does in them. Being a "barefoot" runner doesn't alter training habits such as weekly training volume and pace. This is where most running-related problems exist.

      ...IMO.
      Rod Henderson, PT, ScD, OCS
      It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into. — Jonathan Swift

      Comment


      • #4
        How would a barefoot advocate respond to the longitudinal research on long term runners which fails to demonstrate an increased incidence of OA/injury where the population studied were not barefoot runners?

        I don't recall if the research examined running mechanics but presumably there was a fairly heterogenous population of runners. I'll try to track down the citation for the research to which I'm referring but I think most here are already familiar with it.

        Edit: This is the article I was referencing. I suppose the argument could be that there were increased injuries without increased disability but then are they injuries of importance? Or, the barefoot advocates might argue that running barefoot would be even better yet somehow.
        Last edited by Jon Newman; 15-10-2011, 08:26 PM.
        "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for posting this one Barrett, I hadn't read this one yet. I'm just finishing putting together my lecture I'm doing in about 3 weeks on barefoot running, so I've read a lot about it from both pro and con side. It is always funny to see how the fitness industry and individuals who are willing to believe anything take their slant on what the research really tells us.

          Our brain adjusts our stride and foot placement no matter what shoe we wear or the type of surface we run on. It uses its sensory feedback loops to assess the what it is going to hit when it is running and adjusts to it's most efficient bio-mechanics that it predicts will allow you to be fast and reduce injury.

          Most people will self select a more forefoot or midfoot strike with barefoot, but not everyone (which can be a problem for those that don't). Forefoot/midfoot strike is associated with shorter stride length, quicker stride frequency, forces are generated more posterior so calf and Achilles tendon do more work but less stress to knee. Some studies have also shown improved VO2 max (the 4% improvement does not seem to make a difference in an improved end result of being faster though (as studied with in a Japanese 1/2 marathon - 75% heel strike, 24% midfoot, 1% forefoot and no correlation with speed or race results - which is understandable if you follow the central governor theory of Tim Nokes). There have been no studies that show there is less injuries with barefoot running compared to shod. Studies with trying to match running shoe types to the individual (motion control versus extra cushion) also have never shown to help reduce the injury rate in runners.

          Bottom line if your not having problems don't mess with it. If you are having problems it might be worth a try, but still be very careful - graded exposure!!! And Rod is right I would adjust pace and volume as a first line of defense to reduce injuries.
          Kory Zimney, PT, DPT

          http://koryzimney.blogspot.com

          "Study principles not methods, a mind that can grasp principles will create its own methods." - Gill

          "All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them." - Galileo Galilei

          Comment


          • #6
            Jon, it is interesting that they concluded the runners did better regarding disability due to "increased strength aerobic activity and fitness".

            These factors also allow people to have less pain, recover faster and have better immune systems; this all leads to reduced experiences of disability, in my opinion.

            The study concludes that there is no increased incidence of OA in the runner-group - since this may simply be a case of "better immune systems" of the runners vs. sedentary group, comparing this to barefoot runners is pre-mature.

            With regards to barefoot running - I'm with Rod and Fréderic.
            We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

            I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
            Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

            Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

            We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

            Comment


            • #7
              I'd like to note that I'm actually a barefoot runner (or minimalist shoe) advocate but not for the same reasons usually put forward.

              I do see barefoot running advocates claim that shod running is injurious. The study I posted likely had few to no shod runners considering the years the data was collected. I'm not sure how many subjects wore "running flats" which would be equivalent to the minimalist shoes available now.

              I agree that a direct comparison can't be made but the claim that shod runners are doomed is not supported by the study I posted.
              "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, I agree Jon. The "dangers" of developing OA from running are not supported at all.
                We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

                I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
                Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

                Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

                We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nor disabling injuries.
                  "I did a small amount of web-based research, and what I found is disturbing"--Bob Morris

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree completely Jon. Nothing wrong with minimalist or even barefoot running at all. Definitely don't think it's the panacea the "movement" is claiming either.

                    I wonder if people switching to barefoot running in the name of injury reduction are less likely to show up to a health care provider because of the embarrassment. I can imagine a physician or therapist saying: You started running with no shoes to prevent injury and got injured?
                    Rod Henderson, PT, ScD, OCS
                    It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into. — Jonathan Swift

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Barefoot walking has been shown to decrease forces across the knee. Helpful if one already has OA of the knee.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Kory, perhaps you could post your presentation here once it's done, I, for one, would like to read it.
                        Frédéric Wellens, pht
                        «We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the tone of voice in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.»
                        «
                        Those who cannot understand how to put their thoughts on ice should not enter into the heat of debate.
                        »
                        Friedrich Nietzsche
                        www.physioaxis.ca
                        chroniquesdedouleur blog

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I will gladly do that, hopefully be done by the end of next week.
                          Kory Zimney, PT, DPT

                          http://koryzimney.blogspot.com

                          "Study principles not methods, a mind that can grasp principles will create its own methods." - Gill

                          "All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them." - Galileo Galilei

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The unrest in the barefoot vs. shod communities is almost equivical to the current US political system. Maybe not as much publicity, but the "either you're with us or against us" mentality is how most in the running community seem to work-just look at the comments at the end of the article. I for one ran in shoes with big heels for years. Purchased some minimalist shoes as they were last year's model and significantly reduced in price-what could it harm to just try? Gradually moved from my "big ol'" shoes to minimalist and this is all I run in now because it is comfortable for me. Granted I'm a 15-20 mile/week runner, I can't say that I wouldn't have more injury with increased mileage.

                            I think that until more relevant research is done, the best advice is that it's not for everyone and you can't jump right in.

                            Kory, I would also be interested in any information you'd be willing to share with us.

                            Nick
                            Nick Nordtvedt, PT, DPT, Cert MDT

                            You will never succeed if you are not prepared to fail.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here is my power point.

                              Not sure how the embedded YouTube Video's will work. Plus I overlay some info that fades in and out on each slide with the animations on mouse click, so that may not work with posted presentation. Message me or post questions here if interested in more detail.
                              Attached Files
                              Kory Zimney, PT, DPT

                              http://koryzimney.blogspot.com

                              "Study principles not methods, a mind that can grasp principles will create its own methods." - Gill

                              "All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them." - Galileo Galilei

                              Comment

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