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That Grinds My Gears: Trainers Playing Pretend

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  • #16
    Great post Will. Agree 100%
    Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
    Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
    Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

    Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


    The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

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    • #17
      Rants are great JS and friends. If you use the rods, ART etc on a muscle strain you get myositis ossificans. A sure lawsuit.

      When I was in the Corps JS, a knuckle head sergent was mismanageing a grunts muscle strain. The end result was mysitis ossicicans. I told the grunt, sergent, Navy Surgeron, and sergent's CO that if the mismanagement continues, the Corps was going to be out a lot of $$$. The quad had a nice big mass with hardening. They put the guy on one months reduced training status. He recovered. This stuff can bite you fast.

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      • #18
        Talk about grinding one's gears...

        How's this for insanity?
        Attached Files

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        • #19
          Great posts here!

          I'd also like to add that PTs often like to function as hobby-psychologists as well...especially in weight loss cases...

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          • #20
            Ken,

            I've got to make this picture part of my Power Point presentation.
            Barrett L. Dorko

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            • #21
              Ken, great photo...it could be in Webster's as a picture next to the definition of insanity. Why is it the more daring and crazy the exercise the better an exercise it must be according to some? Heck, lets put some therabands around him and pull in different directions and put it on a whole body vibration plate to REALLY challenge the person a little...
              Kory Zimney, PT, DPT

              http://koryzimney.blogspot.com

              "Study principles not methods, a mind that can grasp principles will create its own methods." - Gill

              "All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them." - Galileo Galilei

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              • #22
                Great rant Will.

                I'm guilty of the aforementioned wrongs and am still working out my feelings with regard to this, in all fairness.

                The day MT's finally understand the science behind our method's effects, find consensus on an explanatory model and especially on that which we are actually touching whereupon our hands land on our client's bodies; is the day we might find credibility within the medical community.

                I don't see it happening anytime soon.
                Carol Lynn Chevrier LMT
                " The truth is, people may see things differently. But they don't really want to. '' Don Draper.

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                • #23
                  Mel Siff always had something brilliant to say on this subject. He even poked some fun at the extremes to which we can take these things (note the image).

                  "Why is it that the modern fitness industry seems to turn even the most basic aspects of training into items which assume neo-cult status? As we have noted, some of the latest offerings on the fitness plate for the starving fitness masses are "core strengthening", "stability training", "core training" and "functional training". Yes, some of these ideas are reviving interest in things that have been taken so much for granted in the world of
                  fitness, but is it necessary to change everything into a cult?

                  For example, is all this effort being expended on ball and wobble board balance training not an inadequate and partial substitute for what is offered in activities that are excellent for enhancing balance and coordination, especially martial arts, gymnastics, dance and trampolining? I found that all of these activities did the world of good for me in improving motor skills (besides what Olympic lifting was already doing in my life)."

                  Here is one of my favorite insights. His comments about his wife Lisa were compelling. Ever wonder why he liked Barrett as much as he did?

                  "Don't become overconcerned about any 'wrong' posture unless you maintain it for too long or at too high a load. If you vary your position regularly, you will usually not experience all of those much-vaunted problems caused by "incorrect" posture. Even if you sit periodically or for longer periods in a given task such as typing in front of a computer, this does not necessarily mean that this posture will be adopted in all other situations, though, at the time, it can cause pronounced discomfort, pain or spasm. That, however, is a long way from guaranteeing that a behaviour acquired in one situation will transfer in an identical fashion to another situation.

                  None of these toys will solve the problem - change comes with awareness training leading to reflexive conditioning of the postures which best suit YOU and not someone else. If you have to execute any task for long periods, make sure that you move parts of the body or the whole body, and even stretch and tense regularly and you will find no need whatsoever for any specialgadgets or seats.

                  I wasted my money on 'ergonomically correct' executive chairs which I bought because I often sit for more than 12 hours a day in front of the computer. I dispensed with any chair which supported my back, placed my balancing ball in storage and chose an ordinary seat with no fancy gimmicks, then I made surethat I moved around a lot, doing a form of something like seated Tai Chi and multi directional very tense stretching.

                  Sometimes my head thrusts forward, sometimes twisted to the side, sometimes my lumbar spine rounds, sometimes it is the picture of postural perfection, sometimes I cross my legs, sometimes my feet are raised or twisted all over the place and so on and so forth. If any persistent back fatigue or shoulder tightness develops, I simply stroll into my home gym, do a few power cleans, pushups or prone back extensions and 5 minutes later, I am ready for another stress-free period in front of my MAC!

                  My paraplegic wife who sits for longer than most of us, finds that the enormous pain produced in her back is also alleviated if she moves, stretches, exercises and carries out 'weight shifts' for brief instants regularly throughout the day. She has also found that most of the specially designed cushions and seats for disabled folk cause as many
                  problems as they prevent, unless one moves and uses any muscles regularly.

                  In short, regular movement rituals will generally achieve more than any ergonomically optimised devices or therapeutic gimmicks."
                  Attached Files

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Jason Silvernail View Post
                    You know what really grinds my gears? When fitness people play pretend doctor.

                    They pretend expertise or experience in the evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and management of a medical problem - usually a painful problem that is musculoskeletal in nature. Oh, I get it. You saw a client once who told you their [insert medical practitioner here] told them something that wasn't right, and then the client did something you coached them in, and the client told you they felt better. You cured them! Wow, you are smarter than that dumb old [doctor, physical therapist, etc]. Riiiiiight.

                    Latest entry from Mr Eric Cressey, here's what I tweeted just now:
                    Now I happen to like Eric Cressey's website and think he's probably an outstanding coach and trainer. He also calls foul on a lot of crap that physical therapists, chiropractors, and physicians do that is spot on and worth mentioning. I've retweeted his material and I've written him "thank you that needed to be said" messages before. He does a lot of stuff right, so this isn't a personal attack on him.

                    I discussed this issue a while back in another thread and I'll repost that here:

                    "Maybe I look at these issues too simply. I think someone is either a trained healthcare provider capable and responsible to examine, diagnose, and treat someone - or they aren't.

                    If I have a patient with a suspected non-musculoskeletal problem, I don't speculate on what it could be unless there is an evidence-based screening criteria I am using, and I don't offer advice or suggestions on treatment since it's outside my area of expertise. I make the referral and move them on, then encourage them to follow the advice of the appropriate clinician and reinforce that advice when I'm aware of it. I realize that for those issues, I don't know what I don't know. I have enough education to be able to explain the physiology of things outside my area of expertise when a diagnosis has been provided by a qualified person (a frequent task for me in my extended family and I'm happy to do it), but I try to be very clear about what I can and cannot do and what I do and do not know. [This is a basic responsibility of any healthcare practitioner]

                    I have seen a lot of fitness type folks who seem to be evaluating and treating medical problems, and I think they are one wrong move away from a bad outcome for both their client and themselves - because they don't know what they don't know."

                    Ironically, fitness and massage people are in a position to positively affect their client's health maybe more than any medical person like me. They can get involved in their life on a somewhat long term basis and steer them toward a healthy lifestyle and provide sound advice on areas they have expertise in. They have so much, and in many ways so much more than medical professionals, to offer that I am bewildered that so many often speak beyond their expertise and training. If you have not had basic science education and training in the evaluation, diagnosis and management of real medical problems then do not pretend you have! This involves real training in real healthcare settings with real sick patients. If you have not had this training you don't know what you don't know. And that can hurt your clients and your career.

                    :clap2::clap2::clap2::clap2:

                    When I read Eric's post I thought the same thing but Jason always has me beat on Articulating thoughts.
                    Michael Reoch
                    www.wellandable.ca

                    PPGPain

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                    • #25
                      I don't see any thing wrong with these pics. Studies have shown standing on a ball means your a dumbass. Sorry couldn't help myself.

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                      • #26
                        I don't see any thing wrong with these pics. Studies have shown standing on a ball means your a dumbass. Sorry couldn't help myself.
                        :clap1:


                        When Mel was in Chicago for a clinic several years ago, he told the story about a client in a fitness center who while doing protocols on a Swiss ball, slipped off the ball and fell through a plate glass window.

                        So much for protocols that should "do no harm."

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                        • #27
                          something about gears....

                          http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_...to_feelin_good
                          "The views expressed here are my own and do not reflect the views of my employer."

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                          • #28
                            An example from Paul Ingraham

                            ...an impression of diagnostic competency in professionals — coaches and trainers — who are trying to seem more like therapists and should not be diagnosing at all. Athletes and fitness buffs are often complicit in this: it’s amazing how much credit they will give to under-qualified professionals. It can be difficult for a personal trainer to resist the temptation to answer a question as if they have the knowledge that a client wants to give them credit for. My mother is a fitness instructor, and routinely amuses me with tales of the questions that class participants will ask her in all earnestness: medical questions!
                            From: http://SaveYourself.ca/articles/func...ent-screen.php
                            Jason Silvernail DPT, DSc, FAAOMPT
                            Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
                            Fellowship-Trained in Orthopedic Manual Therapy

                            Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist


                            The views expressed in this entry are those of the author alone and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              here is a DC using the Graston technique. Looks similar to blood letting to me!He woks at Eric Cressey's place it seems.

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqFKv2s1JFs
                              Anoop Balachandran
                              EXERCISE BIOLOGY - The Science of Exercise & Nutrition

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by anoopbal View Post
                                here is a DC using the Graston technique. Looks similar to blood letting to me!He woks at Eric Cressey's place it seems.

                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqFKv2s1JFs
                                My god anoop, I actually felt sick watching this. Seriously, what are people thinking????
                                You need to literally turn your brain off for this stuff.
                                Byron Selorme -SomaSimpleton and Science Based Yoga Educator
                                Shavasana Yoga Center

                                "The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool" Richard Feynman

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