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  • Gut reaction: Repeated mild food poisoning triggers chronic disease

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1221143041.htm

    Small bacterial infections that may go unnoticed and which the body easily clears without treatment, such as occurs during mild food poisoning, nevertheless can start a chain of events that leads to chronic inflammation and potentially life-threatening colitis.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • Bifidobacterium or fiber protect against deterioration of the inner colonic mucus layer

      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0102103308.htm

      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • New pill tracks gases through your gut

        https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-newsletter-v1
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • How the Victorians help explain our obsession with the microbiome

          https://theconversation.com/how-the-...e%20microbiome
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • Mouse study reveals what happens in the gut after too much fructose

            https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0206140645.htm



            Evidence from previous animal and human studies has shown that excessive sugar ingestion can be harmful, especially to the liver. Chronic over-consumption can lead to obesity and foster insulin resistance that can progress to diabetes; it also can contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer.

            "There is a fundamental physiological difference in how smaller and larger amounts of sugar are processed in the body," explains Joshua D. Rabinowitz of the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University, whose laboratory led the study. The prior view was that the liver processes all ingested sugar. But this study showed that more than 90 percent of the fructose was cleared by the small intestine in mice.

            "We can offer some reassurance -- at least from these animal studies -- that fructose from moderate amounts of fruits will not reach the liver," he says. However, the small intestine probably starts to get overwhelmed with sugar halfway through a can of soda or large glass of orange juice.

            In the study, Rabinowitz and his colleagues studied the path of isotope-labeled fructose through the digestive systems of laboratory mice. The researchers observed that excess fructose that is not absorbed by the small intestine continues through the intestine into the colon. As a consequence, it also comes into contact with the natural microbiotic flora of the large intestine and colon, known as the microbiome.

            "The microbiome is designed to never see sugar," Rabinowitz says. "One can eat an infinite amount of carbohydrates, and there will be nary a molecule of glucose that enters the microbiome. But as soon as you drink the soda or juice, the microbiome is seeing an extremely powerful nutrient that it was designed to never see."

            While the study did not show that fructose influences the microbiome, the authors suggest an effect is likely and should be studied further to learn more about the biological consequences of high sugar intake.

            The investigators also found that the small intestine clears fructose more efficiently after a meal. "We saw that feeding of the mice prior to the sugar exposure enhanced the small intestine's ability to process fructose," said Rabinowitz. "And that protected the liver and the microbiome from sugar exposure." The researchers theorize that in a fasting state, such as upon awakening or in the mid-afternoon, one is extra vulnerable to fructose due to a lessened ability to process it in the small intestine.

            Although the study was conducted in mice, Rabinowitz encourages "the most old-fashioned advice in the world" for humans. Limit sweets to moderate quantities after meals, and do not have sweet drinks away from meal time.
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • Causal effects of the microbiota on immune-mediated diseases

              http://immunology.sciencemag.org/con.../eaao1603.full

              The mammalian immune system has evolved in the presence of a complex community of indigenous microorganisms that constitutively colonize all barrier surfaces. This intimate relationship has resulted in the development of a vast array of reciprocal interactions between the microbiota and the host immune system, particularly in the intestine, where the density and diversity of indigenous microbes are greatest. Alterations in the gut microbiota have been correlated with almost every known immunological disease, but in most cases, it remains unclear whether these changes are a cause or effect of the disease or merely a reflection of epidemiological differences between groups. Here, we review recent efforts to demonstrate a causal role for the microbiota in health and disease, outline experimental advances that have made these studies possible, and highlight how changes in microbial composition may influence immune system function.
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • Drinking kefir may prompt brain-gut communication to lower blood pressure

                https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0425131909.htm
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • Gut check: Metabolites shed by intestinal microbiota keep inflammation at bay

                  https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0504103743.htm
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment


                  • Walnuts impact gut microbiome and improve health

                    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0503175033.htm
                    Jo Bowyer
                    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                    Comment


                    • How the Gut Influences Neurological Diseases

                      http://neurosciencenews.com/gut-neur...diseases-9065/
                      Jo Bowyer
                      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                      Comment

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