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  • Put a Folk in Cognitive Decline: Eating Leafy Greens May Slow Brain Aging by 11 Years

    http://neurosciencenews.com/leafy-gr...in-aging-8225/
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

    Comment


    • Try Exercise to Improve Memory and Thinking

      http://neurosciencenews.com/exercise...thinking-8240/

      Mild cognitive impairment is an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more serious decline of dementia. Symptoms can involve problems with memory, language, thinking and judgment that are greater than normal age-related changes.

      Generally, these changes aren’t severe enough to significantly interfere with day-to-day life and usual activities. However, mild cognitive impairment may increase the risk of later progressing to dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other neurological conditions. But some people with mild cognitive impairment never get worse, and a few eventually get better.

      The academy’s guideline authors developed the updated recommendations on mild cognitive impairment after reviewing all available studies. Six-month studies showed twice-weekly workouts may help people with mild cognitive impairment as part of an overall approach to managing their symptoms.
      Jo Bowyer
      Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
      "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

      Comment


      • Interventions to improve the outcomes of frail people having surgery: A systematic review

        http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0190071
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • Reference data on reaction time and aging using the Nintendo Wii Balance Board: A cross-sectional study of 354 subjects from 20 to 99 years of age

          http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0189598
          Introduction

          “The world is facing a situation without precedent: We soon will have more older people than children and more people at extreme old age than ever before” [1]. Such is the beginning of the WHO report Global Health and Aging, highlighting the rapidly changing demography of the world population. It stresses the importance of a coordinated research effort to develop, improve, and provide innovative solutions to the upcoming challenges in public health [2]. Due to its high frequency and huge consequences in terms of health care service expenditure, morbidity, and mortality, falls among older people is one of these major challenges [35]. Tripping is the most commonly reported cause of falling [6], however, it is most often the result of an interaction between identifiable environmental hazards and the increased individual susceptibility [3]. Accordingly, home hazard assessment and modification together with individual multifactorial risk assessment and intervention are the mainstay of fall prevention in older adults [7].

          A well-documented risk factor of falls is increased reaction time (RT) in both upper and lower extremities [810]. This is thought to be because RT reflects neurocognitive processing speed and functioning. For instance, prospective studies have identified visual processing speed to independently predict injurious falls [11,12] and a recent review found that intraindividual RT variability has a greater predictive utility for falls than mean RT [13]. RT is also responsive to exercise interventions [14,15] and has been extensively tested in various populations, most commonly by measuring the time between a visual stimulus and hitting a response button [16]. However, due to the use of expensive laboratory equipment [1720], predominantly available at universities and hospitals, a clinically feasible cost-effective test of RT has yet to be developed [10]. Some methods have shown promising results [10, 20], while others have proven to be unreliable [21]. One promising new method is with the use of a standard Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB). With game-based assesment [22] or custom software, such as FysioMeter [23], developed at the geriatric department at Aalborg University Hospital, the WBB could become a relevant clinical tool for fall risk assessment. Firstly, the WBB is a widely available, inexpensive, and portable system. Secondly, it has demonstrated good within-day and between-day reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.76–0.87), and it is able to differentiate between young and older adults in both upper and lower limb RT tests [24]. Thirdly, WBB has shown similar or better reproducibility results for other clinically relevant parameters, such as isometric handgrip strength [25], balance assessment [26,27], and uni- [28] and bilateral [29] lower limb strength. Finally, it has successfully been used as intervention tool for enhancing balance control in older adults [30].

          However, studies using the WBB indicate that individual results on relevant clinical parameters are not directly interchangeable with other instruments, e.g. the Jamar handdynamometer [25] or stationary isometric dynamometers [29]. Moreover, the assessment of RT is susceptible to different experimental protocols and set-ups, and the result of one method is rarely interchangeable with another. Before using WBB to measure RT in a clinical setting, there is a need for valid reference data. So far, only smaller studies investigating the validity of WBB have been published. Therefore, the aims of this study are (1) to provide reference data on RT in a larger heterogeneous study-population and (2) to characterize the age-related changes in RT in both males and females.
          Jo Bowyer
          Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
          "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

          Comment


          • A successful backward step correlates with hip flexion moment of supporting limb in elderly people

            http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0190797

            Falls can cause elderly people to require nursing care, and therefore, prevention of falls is an important issue in this population. Moreover, methods of reducing, as much as possible, the impact of falls are necessary in order to decrease the severity of fractures and other injuries [1,2]. The step response involves taking a step to support the body when balance is lost in the standing position. The step response is considered an important postural response for preventing falls and reducing the impact of falls in elderly people. The step response dramatically increases the base of support, providing more dynamic stability than postural responses that correct the body’s alignment along the axis of the ankle or the hip [3]. In addition, the degenerative kyphosis that occurs with age increases the likelihood of elderly people losing their balance backwards [4,5]; thus, it is necessary to focus on the backward step response.

            Maki et al. reported that elderly people who took multiple successive steps after landing the step response were at high risk of falling [6]. When undertaking a kinematic investigation of the differences between stopping at one step and taking multiple successive steps after landing the backward step––that is, the factors that make up a successful step response––it is important to examine the relationship between the center of mass (COM) and the center of pressure (COP) of the stepping limb during step landing. In addition, attention needs to be paid to the supporting functions of the joints of the supporting limb to determine the factors needed to place the stepping leg in a more posterior position.

            The objective of this study was to determine the positional relationship between the COM and the COP at the time of step landing, and to examine their relationship with the joint moments exerted by the supporting leg, with regard to factors of the successful backward step response.
            Jo Bowyer
            Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
            "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

            Comment


            • Mediterranean diet may help protect older adults from becoming frail

              https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0111084950.htm
              Jo Bowyer
              Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
              "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

              Comment


              • Anxiety May Be An Early Indicator of Alzheimer’s

                http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-anxiety-8302/

                Several of my current patients had this as an early indicator, in some cases, it radically changed their personalities. They can become very difficult as their are so preoccupied with whatever is current on their anxiety radar, it is difficult to have a dialogue.
                Jo Bowyer
                Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                Comment


                • Neuron Loss Very Limited in Alzheimer’s

                  http://neurosciencenews.com/neuron-l...zheimers-8326/

                  Summary:
                  A new study challenges conventional belief about Alzheimer’s, finding very minor neuronal and synaptic loss in patients at various stages of the disease.
                  Jo Bowyer
                  Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
                  "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

                  Comment

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