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Have we overlooked the skin in manual therapy?

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  • #46
    then it will have more hard drive available to process its own interoception,
    The brain has ample hard drive. What happens will depend on how the salience networks are triggered and subsequent predictive coding.
    Jo Bowyer
    Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

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    • #47
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0826142315.htm

      Interesting one here. "cells only have 2 senses to interact with the environment, they cannot see or here, but they can feel mechanical forces and taste (chemical). I was thinking about feeling mechanical forces via the cytoskeleton, SC and DNM should do the same thing, as in another type of force on the cell.
      Last edited by smith; 27-08-2016, 04:55 PM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by smith View Post
        https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0826142315.htm

        Interesting one here. "cells only have 2 senses to interact with the environment, they cannot see or here, but they can feel mechanical forces and taste (chemical). I was thinking about feeling mechanical forces via the cytoskeleton, SC and DNM should do the same thing, as in another type of force on the cell.
        Transcription upregulation via force-induced direct stretching of chromatin
        http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v.../nmat4729.html

        Abstract
        Mechanical forces play critical roles in the function of living cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of how forces influence nuclear events remain elusive. Here, we show that chromatin deformation as well as force-induced transcription of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacterial-chromosome dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transgene can be visualized in a living cell by using three-dimensional magnetic twisting cytometry to apply local stresses on the cell surface via an Arg-Gly-Asp-coated magnetic bead. Chromatin stretching depended on loading direction. DHFR transcription upregulation was sensitive to load direction and proportional to the magnitude of chromatin stretching. Disrupting filamentous actin or inhibiting actomyosin contraction abrogated or attenuated force-induced DHFR transcription, whereas activating endogenous contraction upregulated force-induced DHFR transcription. Our findings suggest that local stresses applied to integrins propagate from the tensed actin cytoskeleton to the LINC complex and then through lamina–chromatin interactions to directly stretch chromatin and upregulate transcription.
        This is the abstract of the paper referenced.

        Can hands on methods affect gene expression by application of force?
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

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        • #49
          Originally posted by smith View Post
          https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0826142315.htm

          Interesting one here. "cells only have 2 senses to interact with the environment, they cannot see or here, but they can feel mechanical forces and taste (chemical). I was thinking about feeling mechanical forces via the cytoskeleton, SC and DNM should do the same thing, as in another type of force on the cell.
          Cells have large mechanical forces on them all the time. Sitting, moving, sleeping, gravity..
          The amount of any extra forces manual therapy could create would be ignored by cells, pretty sure, as their job is to hold the body together, and as there is a very thick force-dissipating skin organ between any manual therapist and any target tissue on the inside.
          Such pathetically puny manual therapy forces, denting skin, really, would also be ignored by the CNS, pretty sure, unless they were so strong or ballistic that a threat was perceived (via nociception and/or context).
          On the other hand, large low threshold sensory neurons with mechanoreceptors on the ends, and free-ending C-fibres that code for pleasurable touch, will for sure notice. They may well be able to stir up a new kind of descending modulation in the brain resulting in desirable descending modulation to the dorsal horn, and the large diameter fast fibres can activate inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal horn all by themselves via collaterals into the dorsal horn as they ascend with skinformation, up dorsal columns to the dorsal column nuclei.

          ALL of which is why tissue-based explanatory models for treatment should go the way of the dodo bird.
          Diane
          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
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