Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Evolution, Embryology

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I made a new slide, inspired by what Barrett calls the Third Way.
    I turned the slide into a jpg.

    I'm hoping it is complete all in one diagram. Let me know if you think I left anything out that might be critical.
    Attached Files
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

    Comment


    • #17
      You're right Diane. The "third way" blends what we know and an emphasis on the ectodermal contribution only makes sense.
      Barrett L. Dorko

      Comment


      • #18
        I like it. I would like to see a comparison between what is actually done manually in the third way to put in comparison with the 1st and 2nd.

        This slide is a good conceptual comparison between Operator and Interactor.
        I think a slide with the practicle implications of that slide should go right after it.
        Frédéric Wellens, pht
        «We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the tone of voice in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.»
        «
        Those who cannot understand how to put their thoughts on ice should not enter into the heat of debate.
        »
        Friedrich Nietzsche
        www.physioaxis.ca
        chroniquesdedouleur blog

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Frédéric View Post
          I like it. I would like to see a comparison between what is actually done manually in the third way to put in comparison with the 1st and 2nd.
          What is "done manually" is put one's hands on a person and do stuff, same as in the other two. :angel:

          This slide is a good conceptual comparison between Operator and Interactor.
          I think a slide with the practicle implications of that slide should go right after it.
          What do you mean, practical implications, Fred?
          Diane
          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
          @PainPhysiosCan
          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
          @WCPTPTPN
          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

          @dfjpt
          SomaSimple on Facebook
          @somasimple

          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

          Comment


          • #20
            goodmorning Diane,

            Nice slide. What if the third way were not only pain but general proprioceptive problems as well. Pain is only one of the problems I treat.

            What I am finding, with the taping and bindegewebsmassage is that I am sending "messages", the brain(body) does something with. I am sure you are doing the same with DNM.
            By using the experience & knowledge already out there and bij keeping up with recent research, finding and influencing those parts of the skin (body´s outer brain) is most rewarding.

            Esther

            Comment


            • #21
              Hi Esther,
              I concur. With better information the brain can do a lot more. The Kinesthetic Senses paper (Gandevia) made that quite clear, I thought.
              Diane
              www.dermoneuromodulation.com
              SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
              HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
              Neurotonics PT Teamblog
              Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
              Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
              @PainPhysiosCan
              WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
              @WCPTPTPN
              Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

              @dfjpt
              SomaSimple on Facebook
              @somasimple

              "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

              “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

              “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

              "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

              "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

              Comment


              • #22
                Diane,

                Often, when I talk about this stuff with people, they will inevitably say :
                Then what to you DO to your patients?
                What does that mean clinically? Should I stop manipulating ?
                So basically, you're saying I can do whatever mobs I want, no matter what level or directions...
                ____________________________________
                What is "done manually" is put one's hands on a person and do stuff, same as in the other two
                I know that. Most people I talk to actually wonder what else can be done besides pushing/pulling hard, stretching until a pulling sensation is felt. Moving something stiff... You know, this kind of stuff.

                I think it would be good to see a slide that takes the PT by the hand to show him, briefly, what the implication of your aforementionned slide are on WHAT he actually will do in the clinic.

                Ideas : Rx that use less coercion, put more emphasis on actual instant pain relief, less focused on the «cause». Much gentler handling. That kind of clarification. Something simple that does not go into the details but concretly explains what Interactor stance means for a traditional Operator stance PT viewing the slide.

                That is of course all dependant on what kind of material this slide is associated with. If it only stays in the context of embryology maybe the clarification is less necessary.
                Frédéric Wellens, pht
                «We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the tone of voice in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.»
                «
                Those who cannot understand how to put their thoughts on ice should not enter into the heat of debate.
                »
                Friedrich Nietzsche
                www.physioaxis.ca
                chroniquesdedouleur blog

                Comment


                • #23
                  Fred, having built in the embryology, earlier in the slide show, I intend to finish it off with all the features of skin we should think about (slides not yet built).
                  I have reworked that slide already, by quite a bit. Show you later.
                  Diane
                  www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                  SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                  HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                  Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                  @PainPhysiosCan
                  WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                  @WCPTPTPN
                  Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                  @dfjpt
                  SomaSimple on Facebook
                  @somasimple

                  "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                  “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                  “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                  "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                  "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Origins and Properties of Dental, Thymic, and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells and Their Stem Cells

                    Origins and Properties of Dental, Thymic, and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells and Their Stem Cells

                    PLoS ONE, sorting out the stem cells that contribute to teeth, bone marrow etc. Plenty of neural crest in there. :thumbs_up
                    NC cells and mesenchyme cells work together.
                    Neural crest makes the entire peripheral NS, cranial nerves, Schwann cells, or peripheral glia.

                    Mesenchymal cells arise from the neural crest (NC) or mesoderm. However, it is difficult to distinguish NC-derived cells from mesoderm-derived cells. Using double-transgenic mouse systems encoding P0-Cre, Wnt1-Cre, Mesp1-Cre, and Rosa26EYFP, which enabled us to trace NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells as YFP-expressing cells, we demonstrated for the first time that both NC-derived (P0- or Wnt1-labeled) and mesoderm-derived (Mesp1-labeled) cells contribute to the development of dental, thymic, and bone marrow (BM) mesenchyme from the fetal stage to the adult stage. Irrespective of the tissues involved, NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells contributed mainly to perivascular cells and endothelial cells, respectively. Dental and thymic mesenchyme were composed of either NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells, whereas half of the BM mesenchyme was composed of cells that were not derived from the NC or mesoderm. However, a colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay indicated that CFU-Fs in the dental pulp, thymus, and BM were composed of NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells. Secondary CFU-F assays were used to estimate the self-renewal potential, which showed that CFU-Fs in the teeth, thymus, and BM were entirely NC-derived cells, entirely mesoderm-derived cells, and mostly NC-derived cells, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited drastically by the addition of anti-platelet–derived growth factor receptor-β antibody, regardless of the tissue and its origin. Furthermore, dental mesenchyme expressed genes encoding critical hematopoietic factors, such as interleukin-7, stem cell factor, and cysteine-X-cysteine (CXC) chemokine ligand 12, which supports the differentiation of B lymphocytes and osteoclasts. Therefore, the mesenchymal stem cells found in these tissues had different origins, but similar properties in each organ.
                    Last edited by Diane; 28-03-2016, 04:03 PM. Reason: correction
                    Diane
                    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                    @PainPhysiosCan
                    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                    @WCPTPTPN
                    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                    @dfjpt
                    SomaSimple on Facebook
                    @somasimple

                    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Very interesting, the role of the cell's environment in stemcell differentiation

                      “We thought that, under the same conditions if the cells are identical, that both would differentiate the same way, but that is not what we found,” Jang said. “Cell fate is controlled by G1 lengthening, which extends cilia’s exposure to signals from their environment. That is one cool concept.”
                      Cillium machinery





                      From here
                      Last edited by marcel; 25-03-2016, 02:00 PM.
                      Marcel

                      "Evolution is a tinkerer not an engineer" F.Jacob
                      "Without imperfection neither you nor I would exist" Stephen Hawking

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        The origin and evolution of synaptic proteins – choanoflagellates lead the way
                        Pawel Burkhardt
                        Journal of Experimental Biology 2015


                        Abstract

                        The origin of neurons was a key event in evolution, allowing metazoans to evolve rapid behavioral responses to environmental cues. Reconstructing the origin of synaptic proteins promises to reveal their ancestral functions and might shed light on the evolution of the first neuron-like cells in metazoans. By analyzing the genomes of diverse metazoans and their closest relatives, the evolutionary history of diverse presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins has been reconstructed. These analyses revealed that choanoflagellates, the closest relatives of metazoans, possess diverse synaptic protein homologs. Recent studies have now begun to investigate their ancestral functions. A primordial neurosecretory apparatus in choanoflagellates was identified and it was found that the mechanism, by which presynaptic proteins required for secretion of neurotransmitters interact, is conserved in choanoflagellates and metazoans. Moreover, studies on the postsynaptic protein homolog Homer revealed unexpected localization patterns in choanoflagellates and new binding partners, both which are conserved in metazoans. These findings demonstrate that the study of choanoflagellates can uncover ancient and previously undescribed functions of synaptic proteins.
                        Most of our knowledge on the origin and evolution of metazoan synaptic proteins is at an early stage. It is now an exciting time to launch into this topic, a time with great promise for new insights into a pivotal event in metazoan history – the emergence of the first synapses and neurons. Choanoflagellates are beginning to emerge as model organisms to provide clues into the ancestry of synaptic proteins. The discovery in choanoflagellates (and in the filasterean C. owczarzaki) of protein family members that are integral to neuronal function in metazoans (Fig. 2B) underscores the relevance of these two groups to our understanding of the origin of synaptic proteins. While work on C. owczarzaki synaptic protein homologs is currently not available, the first studies on synaptic protein homologs have been conducted in choanoflagellates.


                        http://jeb.biologists.org/content/218/4/506
                        Last edited by marcel; 08-01-2017, 06:58 PM.
                        Marcel

                        "Evolution is a tinkerer not an engineer" F.Jacob
                        "Without imperfection neither you nor I would exist" Stephen Hawking

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X