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Social "healing"

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  • VIS Social "healing"

    A sidebar to the A process approach thread, and the discussion of the word "healing"..
    My contention is that if we accept "pain" as a biopsychosocial phenomenon, then we have to reclaim and rehabilitate "healing" as a biopsychosocial phenomenon also.

    It's so big I don't even know where it begins. Maybe it doesn't. Maybe it's been there the whole time.

    Different meanings for "self" within culture, is a consideration. In some cultures self is completely intertwined with the culture. In our own, not so much. In our own, it seems to me, individuals are what are left over after the "we" of it all has been atomized since forever into replicating robots, programmed to eat/sleep/work/buy/pay taxes.

    The most poignant thing I saw all week was during the wrap-up of Canada's truth and reconciliation committee's hearings on aboriginal matters. A whole lot of first nations people gathered in every centre in Canada and poured out their stories of abuse and despair at being dislocated physically, culturally, spiritually, psycho-socially, away from their families, as children, for generations, and forced to go to "school" where they were subjected to all manner of abuse, and a lot of deprivation, for over 150 years. The last residential school closed in 1996, right here in Sask.

    Somehow even with all that cultural genocide they managed to keep it together.

    Symbols are hugely important in cultural referencing and, yes, social healing.

    A news clip showed a basket, being handed to another organizer. Inside were ashes. Apparently before the talks/hearings began, in Edmonton at least, a fire was started (and was kept alight perhaps, throughout). All the used tissues full of tears shed by the participants as they recounted their personal horror stories to the Canadian public were saved and burned in the fire. The basket contained ashes of that fire. The hope is that some day the basket of ashes will find a home in a museum or official centre that commemorates this ugly history of how native peoples were treated by colonialists so that no one can ever claim ignorance. The basket now holds the collective pain, leaving the individuals free to pursue their personal healing.
    I really like that idea. Exporting the social pain, making it sacred somehow, making it communal, probably makes it easier to deal with/heal from the personal pain.

    Here is the story of the basket.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Diane; 05-06-2015, 01:35 AM.
    Diane
    www.dermoneuromodulation.com
    SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
    HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
    Neurotonics PT Teamblog
    Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
    Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
    @PainPhysiosCan
    WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
    @WCPTPTPN
    Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

    @dfjpt
    SomaSimple on Facebook
    @somasimple

    "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

    “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

    “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

    "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

    "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

  • #2
    My contention is that if we accept "pain" as a biopsychosocial phenomenon, then we have to reclaim and rehabilitate "healing" as a biopsychosocial phenomenon also.
    Absolutely. Thank you for a beautiful post.
    Christine

    Comment


    • #3
      Open access so far: On the (f)utility of pain.
      “son, there are worse things than pain”.. “I want to be here for this”, he said with a sweep of his hand around the room, “even for the pain. Not really being here would make me suffer.”... my training as an anthropologist alerted me to something in Daniel's explanation: he had separated the concepts of pain and suffering in a way that was unusual in western biomedical contexts.
      When I pressed one clinician further about a patient who seemed to be in ongoing pain, he exclaimed: “You Americans are so concerned with comfort! Don't you think anything should be difficult? This patient is dying.” When I asked the patient about this, she explained: “Pain is necessary. It is a reality one needs to face. Running away from it is what leads to suffering.”
      I have changed my approach to pain management. I no longer ask “Is this patient in pain?” Instead, I ask “How do I relieve this person's suffering?” For some patients in severe pain, opiates are of clear benefit. But other patients have the impossible hope that opiates will obliterate rather than reduce their pain, a hope which might make them suffer more as they seek a pain-free existence. I now begin every conversation about pain management by acknowledging the reality of an individual's pain, expressing an alliance to reduce his or her suffering, and then discussing how relieving suffering may not always be the same thing as relieving pain.
      Diane
      www.dermoneuromodulation.com
      SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
      HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
      Neurotonics PT Teamblog
      Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
      Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
      @PainPhysiosCan
      WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
      @WCPTPTPN
      Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

      @dfjpt
      SomaSimple on Facebook
      @somasimple

      "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

      “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

      “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

      "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

      "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

      Comment


      • #4
        Last time I asked one of my expert ongoing complex pain patients about his feet, (erythromelagia) he said "I don't want to think about that right now, I've tuned it out". Quite right too! I'm here to help with what he has yet to work out for himself.
        Jo Bowyer
        Chartered Physiotherapist Registered Osteopath.
        "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,there is a field. I'll meet you there." Rumi

        Comment


        • #5
          Sometimes in order for us to be healed we must go out and socialize.

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