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  • Not catchy enough

    Many of the things I've thought about in the realm of therapy have gone nowhere. I've been thinking about them lately because I spend more time on social media (especially Facebook) than I did in the past. This is a function of my aging, which I can't seem to escape. Drat!

    Anyway, this blog will be about the things I've read about or proposed in no particular order that don't seem reflected among those younger than I am. That includes almost all therapists. Those on social media are commonly more formally educated than I am.

    I'll begin. I've long understood that "all pain is neurogenic," which sounds a lot more intelligent than it actually is. It means that I can cut my nails without any complaint of pain. Whole shops, an industry in fact, is devoted to this. There's probably a national convention of nail salons.

    In any case, the treatment of painful complaint is not limited by this. It is thought to limit treatment.

    If a complaint of pain is the end result of enough nociceptive firing to result in it, and that firing is neurogenic in nature, why has this phrase (to me it's a relatively simple fact) never caught on?
    Barrett L. Dorko

  • #2
    If you want widespread acceptance of your ideas by colleagues and academics, you will have to give them what they really want. It's not about catchiness.

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    • #3
      EG,

      What people want isn't always what is offered or learned. You'd think that science always revealed what was imagined by humans. That's advertising, not science.

      I would certainly think that advertising is very powerful, but I'd prefer science. As Carl Sagan once said (paraphrased):

      I don't see things as I'd prefer them to be, but as they are.
      Barrett L. Dorko

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
        EG,

        What people want isn't always what is offered or learned.
        Right! So give them what they want and you'll find the widespread acceptance you desire.

        Everyone wants the same thing- therapists and patients alike. Underlying all surface level desires and concerns is the universal need to find and be ones true self. SC utilizes this theme. SC has a practitioner adopt the attitude of: "just do whatever feels good and throw caution to the wind. Don't defend, don't protect, just move spontaneously and according to need. I'll support you in that". That's why it works (not due to tissues untwisting).

        So if SC has a small uptake it's because it doesn't move practitioners in a way that feels good for them, or true for them. If you put aside theory and any concerns for the patient, how would you do treatment in a way which pleased you and you only? When you know this, compare it with what the patient wants and see if there's any overlap. Luckily there is, because as I said at the top, we all want the same things in life.

        [edited]
        Last edited by EG-Physio; 12-07-2017, 02:44 PM.

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        • #5
          EG,

          You have no actual understanding of Simple Contact.
          Barrett L. Dorko

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
            EG,

            You have no actual understanding of Simple Contact.
            That's possible, but I'm a pretty good observer.

            Have you ever tried just totally letting go, not thinking, not caring about outcome and just giving L5 a poke for 5 minutes then finishing treatment? It would be quite liberating for someone like you. Experiment and have fun with your own expression of therapy, rather than fitting it to the patient.
            Last edited by EG-Physio; 12-07-2017, 03:06 PM.

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            • #7
              EG,

              You seem to be able to read another's mind and "know" what they're feeling.

              I don't. I would contend that no one does.
              Barrett L. Dorko

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
                EG,

                You seem to be able to read another's mind and "know" what they're feeling.

                I don't. I would contend that no one does.
                I know deep down that's a compliment (and I know you'll deny it, that's ok).

                Thank you.

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                • #9
                  Another example of being able to read another's mind.
                  Barrett L. Dorko

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                  • #10
                    Honestly, reading this is like listening to the Trump administrations explanations of things. EG do you understand what Barrett knows about SC? If not, then I suggest you do some googling. You may be surprised to learn that Barrett Dorko is not the most common name.

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                    • #11
                      Mine is not a common name. In fact, I currently think that it's the only one on Google. Not that that is any recommendation however. Have I mentioned that my son works for them? Google I mean.

                      I wonder where my mother came up with the name of "Barrett." I would tell others that "it was an old boyfriend." Those who knew my mother probably guessed it wasn't true. She probably read it somewhere. I would also joke that my twin, named "Leah," was the undesirable sister of Rachel - which makes it biblical. That probably wasn't true either.

                      In any case, it's a strange name. I use it all the time.
                      Barrett L. Dorko

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                      • #12
                        If the push-back on the "all pain is neurogenic" thing isn't forthcoming, I have another thing built on that - the origins of pain. There are four and I've written of them endlessly.

                        Many of the methods assigned to the therapy community (for painful complaints), if not all of them, ignore this.

                        And it has certainly been ignored.
                        Last edited by Barrett Dorko; 13-07-2017, 12:35 AM.
                        Barrett L. Dorko

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post

                          In any case, it's a strange name. I use it all the time.

                          How about the guy who pronounced it "barrette"
                          Attached Files

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                          • #14
                            Ken,

                            Well, I've heard that. I used to correct the speaker, realizing they hadn't seen that used for a first name before. Heck, they'd probably never saw it.

                            Up until I moved to Boston in '75 I was referred to as Barry, including my whole family. I decided then to use my entire name. Sometimes a person will call me "Barry". I tell them my name is Barrett, but always add, "Many who love me, call me Barry."
                            Barrett L. Dorko

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
                              EG,

                              As Carl Sagan once said (paraphrased):
                              I was very much like that too. It's an uncomfortable way to live. Our experience of the world is our own and cannot be shared or experienced by anyone else. We create our experience by adding meaning to a bunch of sensory inputs. There's no 'how-it-is-objectivity', there's only 'how-I-choose-to-interpret-it-subjectivity'.

                              If you entered the treatment room and decided (as per SC guidelines) to just do whatever felt right for you, and found yourself spontaneously dancing and singing, then so long as you shared your energy with the patient, he would do very well. What I'm saying is if you can do treatment in a way which is pleasing for you it will be maximally effective.
                              Last edited by EG-Physio; 13-07-2017, 10:06 AM.

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