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  • Tension

    Mechanical tension never occurs without producing some compression (what is commonly called "pinching") and vice versa. I have never seen one occur without some of the other. It can't happen.

    This is as true of the nervous tissue as anything else, and since all pain is neurogenic and has multiple origins, well, you can see the point I've been trying to make all these years.

    I've a story about something that relieves neural tension, movement and treatment that accompanies this. It emphasizes several things about manual practice that I think are relevant to therapy.

    More soon.
    Barrett L. Dorko

  • #2
    A couple of years ago I was awakened at night with both my hands asleep. They were tingling and numb but these symptoms disappeared after stood.

    I eventually figured out what was going on. My work since 1980 had taught me what I needed.

    Any guesses?
    Barrett L. Dorko

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    • #3
      Let me try this: What happens to the nerves that support the hands when you stand?
      Barrett L. Dorko

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      • #4
        For any new members or lurkers: think about what happens when someone's head lies on your arm in bed, and you need to move to "bring feeling back or even muscle action!" (called paralyse d'amour in French). What really happens to that nerve?
        We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

        I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
        Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

        Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

        We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

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        • #5
          Bas,

          I probably should have said that I don't sleep with an arm beneath my head, I just flex my elbows. Of course, you could have just asked me.

          I use more than one pillow because I have a thick chest. It's genetic. Have I mentioned that?
          Barrett L. Dorko

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          • #6
            Barrett, I knew you were not referring to that paralyse d'amour, but I thought I use a more romantic example of ...well, you know. What happens to those nerves in those circumstances.
            Because I heard romance and sex sells.
            (iparalyse d'amour is called Saturday night palsy in English - obviously much less romantic)
            We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

            I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
            Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

            Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

            We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

            Comment


            • #7
              The basic idea behind much of what I think comes from Breig's text titled Adverse Mechanical Tension in the Central Nervous System. It was written in 1978 and I read it in 1980. I know, I know, that was a long time ago.

              Still, I said to my classes, "Breig was a Swedish neurosurgeon, and after twenty years concluded that tension would have produced the same symptoms as compression. He directed his technique toward relieving that tension."

              I understand that Shacklock has reproduced the book.
              Barrett L. Dorko

              Comment


              • #8
                Bas,

                You're right. Nothing beats amore in the title of something. I'm pretty sure some songs have been written about that.

                I'm being sarcastic.
                Barrett L. Dorko

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                • #9
                  Given that I DON'T involve more than the nerves that support the hands (ulnar and median ones) and that the tingling and/or numbness (commonly present prior to the output of pain occurring) was relieved without standing but by just extending the elbows - What might be concluded?
                  Barrett L. Dorko

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What might manual care have done for my "problem?"

                    What of strengthening?

                    What of other origins of symptoms, pain being one of them?
                    Barrett L. Dorko

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The entire hand was numb? Could be bilateral compression at the cubital tunnel with prolonged flexion.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No.

                        Often the ulnar aspect went numb first, often by itself (sometimes left, sometimes right) and the numbness wakened me at various times Elbow extension of the involved side resolved the symptom quickly.
                        Barrett L. Dorko

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          so, you thinking that the lack of tension through shoulder girdles when in lying creates a disturbance in your nervous system's default input? And the tingling is an altered output in effort to create awareness?

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                          • #14
                            I assume the tingling precedes any pain, and it doesn't occur when I don't flex my elbows for prolonged periods. I don't know how you'd defend it producing awareness. I think that I survive by waking.

                            I assume that my inability to tolerate as much tension in the relevant nervous tissue is for the same reasons I don't reach like I once did - I'm old.

                            Have I mentioned that?
                            Barrett L. Dorko

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm left to wonder what "tension" in the shoulder girdle has to do with numbness in my hands. Since when does "tension" (whatever that is) rise when I'm not lying down?
                              Barrett L. Dorko

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