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  • #16
    Does anyone else have thoughts about how muscles contract when we're not consciously using them? How about when we're not able to use them? I've been asked on Facebook about it.

    My impression is that "body language" is always emerging, unless we're dead. Playing poker, which involves "holding movement in" and invisible to another's sight is potentially painful. I've been told that holding movement from unconsciously emerging is troublesome. If it isn't, that's because it wasn't needed as much. Of course, this is easy to say.

    To me, there's either alive or dead. Perhaps there's more.

    We change the amount of tension in the nervous tissue (and, of course, compression) accumulated as we acquire any position. This is why I wrote a three-part blog post titled In praise of recliners several years ago. Recliners give us more freedom to move unconsciously than other chairs. Fashion sometimes interferes with this.

    Over to you.
    Barrett L. Dorko

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
      Does anyone else have thoughts about how muscles contract when we're not consciously using them? How about when we're not able to use them? I've been asked on Facebook about it.

      Over to you.
      I do believe that full attentive processing can take place outside of awareness. I would think then that our unconscious muscular activity would be determined by the cognitive processing we are not aware of.

      Cognitive processing does not have to be conscious. Capabilities and behavior of the cognitive unconscious are not well understood. One idea is there are multiple cognitive centers, maybe to be thought of as secondary centers of consciousness.

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      • #18
        "Outside of awareness" tends to be something known a lot more about the last couple of years. Have you read any of Eagleman's work?

        I don't use the word "believe" at all. I understand that humans are comforted by believing in things, so I've decided to ask about the defense of what they "believe." I'm not all that popular for such a thing, and I risk being punched a lot.

        I don't know what the difference being "conscious" and "cognitive" is. I use planned and unplanned. Is "conscious" motion planned motion? I just don't know.
        Barrett L. Dorko

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        • #19
          Might tension in the nervous tissue add to an output of a complaint of pain by adding to the nociception received by the central nervous system? Would relieving that tension reduce a complaint of pain?
          Barrett L. Dorko

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
            Might tension in the nervous tissue add to an output of a complaint of pain by adding to the nociception received by the central nervous system? Would relieving that tension reduce a complaint of pain?


            Doubtful in most cases


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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            • #21
              Oh.

              A complaint of pain is multifactorial. That's why a lot of methods "work." People "love" their therapists because they try hard, are "likable" or some other things - I'll let you figure out other reasons.

              Somebody should tell Breig that he was mostly wrong about what could happen with tension.

              Of course, tension is just one of four origins of painful complaint. Perhaps I'm wrong about that too.

              What do you think?
              Barrett L. Dorko

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              • #22
                Tension

                Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
                Oh.



                A complaint of pain is multifactorial. That's why a lot of methods "work." People "love" their therapists because they try hard, are "likable" or some other things - I'll let you figure out other reasons.



                Somebody should tell Breig that he was mostly wrong about what could happen with tension.



                Of course, tension is just one of four origins of painful complaint. Perhaps I'm wrong about that too.



                What do you think?


                Yes I would say the tension is likely necessary but not sufficient for the painful experience.


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                Last edited by fallingreason; 10-06-2017, 07:15 PM.

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                • #23
                  fallingreason,

                  I think that there's a typo in your last reply. Please fix it or restate it so that I can see what your thinking.

                  I would say that if you mean that tension is "insufficient," I would say, "What of the twisted finger, the Hammerlock (referred to in the Dick the Bruiser post) or the Indian wrist burn?", recovered from quickly once an impediment to corrective movement occurs?

                  I use Simple Contact as a method to start a recovery ( and, sometimes complete) from painful origins because of the presence of ideomotion, our instinctive tendency to move correctively and the observations of Patrick Wall - which I've written endlessly about. What it does about the other origins of pain I can only speculate about, mainly because they're invisible. There's evidence though.

                  Simple Contact depends upon unconscious processes and neural tension as an underlying reason for its use. Understanding why you'd use it requires that the therapist understand a lot. Though the one bringing it actually does little (or nothing) they understand a lot.

                  What they understand is often boring. It's the epitome of simplicity lies on the far side of complexity.
                  Last edited by Barrett Dorko; 10-06-2017, 05:37 PM.
                  Barrett L. Dorko

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                  • #24
                    This thread came to me in a dream (okay, via Facebook) and I think it's relevant to this one. It was written in 2012.

                    For some reason, I pointed toward the second post, but I suggest that the whole thread be read.
                    Barrett L. Dorko

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