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  • angaho
    replied
    Hello, I am revisiting this thread while older and with more experience.

    And since my last visit I down-shifted to less working hours per week. The job is as physiotherapist for elderly people in a nursing home. I do quite a lot of tasks that has very little to do with physiotherapy, but a lot to do with managing the environment, both for the care givers and the residents.

    If care for elderly people in a nursing home allowed them to participate even more in their daily life, they would probably stay healthy longer and lose function slower.

    But the organization of care doesn’t really allow that much participation by the residents.
    It is the same problem as in healthcare in general:
    A lot of fancy wording about patient centered care, while big corporations with their own interests, financial or geopolitical, have most of the power and will follow through with their agenda, hiding behind cliches.

    Ok, I’m ranting. Old folks privilege.

    Just trying to get some fire and activity going in this place. Pouring any words in here, might help.
    And in the long run some struggling body workers that wants to learn about pain management might find their way here..





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  • nykinvic
    replied
    But when you deconstruct the actual movement required to go up some stairs, you have
    to admit that many still possess the strength and control required to complete the task.
    The Italians might because they do. A surprising number of the people I see in homecare have grown unable to roll themselves in their own beds, nevermind climb stairs...

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  • caro
    replied
    On a recent trip to Atrani, Italy, I was amazed at how the fact that most people, young and old, have to go up several flights of stairs to reach their homes. Probably several times a day. I observed closely how most, young and old, do it: they do it slowly. One. At. The. Time.

    When we first arrived, we took them two at the time. There were 130 steps to our apartment. We slowed down, local style, after a few copious meals.

    My mother, who is a spry, healthy 75 year old purchased her condo for that very reason: stairs or lack thereof.

    But when you deconstruct the actual movement required to go up some stairs, you have
    to admit that many still possess the strength and control required to complete the task.

    Perhaps what is lacking to most, is a comfortable rapport to the idea of how completing the task now takes more time, and what that might mean.
    Last edited by caro; 16-01-2016, 03:18 PM.

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  • chrislowndes
    replied
    Tom Hanna wrote about this myth of aging, structural issues aside which occur over time I would say a great deal is just the nervous system.

    I read somewhere and still to this day am trying to recall the book/article where a surgeon recalling a pre-operation appointment with an elderly man who shuffled into his office. At the conclusion of the appointment the patient shuffled to the door and the doctor said something to the patient who could not just turn his head but had to shuffle the whole rigid torso around to see the doctor.

    During the operation the surgeon recalled how the mans neck and limbs were free as you could wish for with no apparent restrictions that were apparent in the old mans waking state.

    Another example of this lack of freedom was when my brother an I were recently walking into a DIY store and in front of us was a lady in her early 60s, there was a small kerb onto the pavement and she was unable to move freely enough to take this into account and she was aware of it I saw her prepare, however she tripped but she didn't just collapse i.e. bend at knees, she fell like a statue, it shocked me the rigidity of her nervous system

    all

    the

    way

    down.

    We sometimes think we are our thoughts.

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  • angaho
    replied
    The previous two posts

    The beliefs we have about aging and movement are probably a big part of what we allow ourselves to do, outside of consciously exercising. A lot of our movement is done in order to communicate with others in a non-verbal way. The image or meme of old people being stiff, keeping things together, serious, might play a part in how the nervous tissue behaves.

    "Old people do not run to get to the bus in time." "Old people do not jump up and down and laugh loudly when they are happy." (If not drunk or mad.) "Old people do not flirt, walk or move in a sexy way, turn their head when someone attractive passes by." "Old people do not squat, lie on the floor or in the grass, flap their arms or legs etc etc"




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk. Welcome to www.sekito.se :-)
    Last edited by angaho; 15-01-2016, 01:43 PM.

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  • Ken Jakalski
    replied
    Hi Nari!

    Some never see any reason to slow down as they ease into the 7th decade and tend to remain functionally flexible.

    I don't know if it is dependent on personality, but it is still feasible for 60 -70 somethings to do a full squat and also touch toes in standing. Mind you, that doesn't help much if one's brain starts to fade....:angel:
    I agree with this. I occasionally get crap from my runners about being an "old man." This past fall I told them I could one-arm cold snatch a 45 pound Olympic bar to full overhead without the bar tipping. The length of the bar is what scares them, and makes them think it's harder than it really is. My balance point isn't perfect, but I haven't done this in a while.
    Attached Files

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  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    Genetics.

    My son told me it was the mayonnaise that precipitated my heart condition while I always figured it had more to do with my father and his six brothers.

    Leave a comment:


  • nari
    replied
    I think some people age faster than others because it is seems "inevitable" for them.
    Some never see any reason to slow down as they ease into the 7th decade and tend to remain functionally flexible.

    I don't know if it is dependent on personality, but it is still feasible for 60 -70 somethings to do a full squat and also touch toes in standing. Mind you, that doesn't help much if one's brain starts to fade....:angel:

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    Though I agree that dancing "freely" is an excellent idea, the image of Bas dancing I find disturbing. I need to get over that.

    In any case, there's a plethora of ways we might feel younger than our stated age, and ways of "looking" younger. This is a complicated thing and advertising certainly plays a role.

    My mother could get down on the floor with her grandchildren yet she was gray at an early age. The hair in my beard is now more "salt" than "pepper" yet I have no gray hair on top. Go figure.

    I certainly don't move as a once did. I blame this on the restricted motion of my nervous tissue. That seems reasonable.

    Any relevant studies on this?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ken Jakalski
    replied
    Hi Bas!

    I find I thrive when I can attend parties which involve dancing.
    We play music from the time teams start arriving at our big cross country invitational. Without fail, runners begin dancing. Often, as in the image below, rival teams get together to dance.
    Attached Files

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  • caro
    replied
    Also, Mo Johnson mentioned this book-written in 2003.

    She interviewed Wall and Melzack (here in Montréal!). Sapolsky is mentioned, as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • caro
    replied
    At the Spa where I work, I've been getting many clients who present with what you describe, Bas.

    ''Can you do something about the legs, we attended my X-mas party and danced all night. Holy crap am I ever sore!''

    They say it with a smile...

    Speaking of the Spa. It's a big place, many treatment rooms. We all pretty much finish at the same time, so there is a bunch of us waiting for the clients to emerge, in the dim hallways. You should see us, young and old, moving and expressing ourselves authentically. I spoke about this the other day, in the employee room.

    One of the young ones said: ''It's funny how we don't seem to mind that there are cameras, filming the hallways...''

    I use that one with clients a lot...
    Last edited by caro; 18-12-2015, 05:39 PM.

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  • Bas Asselbergs
    replied
    Barrett, I find I thrive when I can attend parties which involve dancing.

    After a few songs where my wife and I dance together (holding each other), we let go and dance "free" style.
    Even the next day we both still smile - our bodies tired but happy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    Thanks Bas. The desire to "lengthen," express and move grows in conjunction with the culture's admonition to do less as we age. It's confusing.

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  • Bas Asselbergs
    replied
    Yes. I find I crave lengthening motion more than ever.

    Leave a comment:

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