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  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    I'm also convinced that whether we like it or not, or do something about it, our nervous tissue's ability to move around within us (what I liken to "floating") decreases with age.

    Would you agree?

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    Ryan,

    I like what you've said because it recognizes the opposition to change both the public and the professions must face.

    To me, the culture's ability to order and "civilize" our existence is both limiting and full of freedom. It is also all around us, like water to a fish. It is essentially invisible. No wonder it remains so powerful.

    In order to pursue money (culture) it has become necessary for the corporations to turn my profession into something I hardly recognize, and from which I've been mainly exiled - mainly due to my own machinations.
    Last edited by Barrett Dorko; 18-12-2015, 02:05 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ryan A
    replied
    Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
    So, if we're self-corrective, what are therapists for?
    To be counter-cultural.

    At least when the dominant culture is one that promotes ignorance, fear, or movement further from resolution of a mechanical pain problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    When I wrote Are we self-corrective? in Four Questions I think that many therapists wondered (if that were true) why we even existed.

    What I didn't mention in that post was the power possessed by the culture to oppose correction of the mechanical deformation acquired as life is lived.

    So, if we're self-corrective, what are therapists for?

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    started a topic The previous two posts

    The previous two posts

    The previous blog posts, Four Questions and How I see the invisible didn't raise the ire within the therapy community I thought they might.

    Underlying both posts is the problem of invisibility.

    When something isn't readily seen with the naked eye or understood to exist in a certain way, humans speculate. We use things we're familiar with as metaphors. But the things that therapists have chosen aren't a whole lot like the person we actually treat.

    I've said that the nervous tissue “floats around” within us and it seems that regular pursuit of the desired task is a good idea.

    Mel Siff always advocated this.

    Thoughts?
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