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The immaterial

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  • The immaterial

    I heard about The Knick on a couple of podcasts and decided to watch it. I thought that there was something in this depiction of medicine’s advance in the year 1900 waiting for me to see.

    The next great fortunes will be a result of the immaterial, the unseen, buzzing all around us like electricity, and X-rays.

    A statement made by a wealthy man to the sleazy hospital administrator.
    I’ve been thinking a lot about how the invisibility of a complaint drives many to speculate, guess, violate physical law and make stuff up.

    Pain is many things, but, it’s also invisible.
    Barrett L. Dorko

  • #2
    I know of people that have recently gone through surgery for cancer, and people have said to them afterwards, "you look well".
    Registered osteopath
    Registered personal trainer
    http://twitter.com/NickEfthimiou

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    • #3
      Perhaps this is the root of physical therapy's problem with senseless treatment - the invisible.

      Many of the things we are expected to change with our methods can't be seen so we assign those findings we can see and measure all sorts of consequences we've since found have no relation to the problem. Abdominal muscle weakness and back pain, for instance.

      Calling our findings objective and adhering to the now discredited biomedical model has not helped. Remember, the vast majority of therapists actually treating patients read nothing.

      This has resulted in a century of lagging behind the scientific and counter cultural discoveries of medicine.

      Is it possible that such a thing has occurred?
      Barrett L. Dorko

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      • #4
        Nick,

        I think this thread addresses your comment.
        Barrett L. Dorko

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        • #5
          I have been listening avidly to Ginger Campbell's brain science podcasts.
          Some of them have revolutionised my thought. Jaak Panksepp is my new hero plus great talks on meditation,glial cells,the science of exercise,disgust,sleep and the evolution of the synapse. They are delivered by great minds who are surprised and pleased that someone is interested in their thoughts( and trying to sell their latest book).


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            Hi jazzyq,
            Please start a thread in the welcome forum to introduce yourself. A first name would be nice too.
            Diane
            www.dermoneuromodulation.com
            SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
            HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
            Neurotonics PT Teamblog
            Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
            Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
            @PainPhysiosCan
            WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
            @WCPTPTPN
            Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

            @dfjpt
            SomaSimple on Facebook
            @somasimple

            "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

            “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

            “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

            "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

            "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jazzyg View Post
              I have been listening avidly to Ginger Campbell's brain science podcasts.
              Some of them have revolutionised my thought. Jaak Panksepp is my new hero plus great talks on meditation,glial cells,the science of exercise,disgust,sleep and the evolution of the synapse. They are delivered by great minds who are surprised and pleased that someone is interested in their thoughts( and trying to sell their latest book).


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
              Yes major influence on me also.Loved Panksepp as well, Bud Craig, the one on Brain Rhythms, neural reuse, Ratey and meditation.
              Not forgetting all the Embodied Cognition talks.What a resource.I regularly direct questions at researchers and 9/10 reply.Jaak Panksepp wrote me a lovely long reply, he was excited that a physical therapist found his work useful.
              Although I believe Richard Davidson's and Tania Singers work on emotion is more pertinent,Panksepp had been delving into deep brain emotional underpinnings long before it became so trendy.
              I try to get every friend to listen to them. I do hope she continues for another few years.

              Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

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              • #8
                I might take this one step further, and since I'm working nights this month, I can say firmly another thing worth examining when we talk about pain is actual material conditions, not just material things within the body we can prove contribute to pain. We talk a lot here about how people's dissatisfying jobs and home lives can drive them toward somatization. One of the big studies on surgical resident work hours noted while 16-hour days vs 30-hour didn't change burnout rates, the residents working 30-hour shifts had more neck and back pain. Big surprise. These are material conditions too, at least in the philosophical sense if not the scientific.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mgallagh View Post
                  These are material conditions too, at least in the philosophical sense if not the scientific.
                  I think they would fit just fine into the science-based psychosocial /stress regulation aspects of a biopsychosocial model of pain.
                  Diane
                  www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                  SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                  HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                  Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                  Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                  @PainPhysiosCan
                  WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                  @WCPTPTPN
                  Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                  @dfjpt
                  SomaSimple on Facebook
                  @somasimple

                  "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                  “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                  “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                  "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                  "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                  Comment

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