Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The time machine

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Milehigh
    replied
    Dr Stanley Paris is a Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association, an Honorary Fellow of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy, an Honorary Life Member of the New Zealand Manual Therapy Association, an Honorary Life Member and Founders Award Recipient of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapy, a Fellow and Honorary Life Member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapy, and Member of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy in England
    Blah Blah Blah

    I love the fact he states in the interview that he treats as part of a medical model, that has not been proven reliable. He then makes a statement like it is a for gone conclusion that this will happen not if it can be done.

    Eric

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    Aren't there some St. Augustine students here?

    Have they nothing to say about what they've been obliged to "believe"?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ken Jakalski
    replied
    I remember my wife and I were so moved by the Olivier commercial that we almost bought the camera (200 bucks).

    Thank goodness we didn't have any money at the time.

    We still don't.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ken Jakalski
    replied
    Hey Barrett!

    Absent the business model we could sure use a celebrity spokesperson. Unfortunately, Paul Newman (an Ohio Boy) is no longer with us and the Kardashian's are busy otherwise.
    Or for some real credilbility, how about Lord Laurence Olivier?

    Remember when he did that Polaroid SX-70 commercial?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDB9Ty3WPBc

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    Absent the business model we could sure use a celebrity spokesperson. Unfortunately, Paul Newman (an Ohio Boy) is no longer with us and the Kardashian's are busy otherwise.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Newman
    replied
    Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
    I love the episode of Mad Men titled The Wheel. My favorite line:



    I feel like I entered one yesterday listening to this interview. I was transported to 1974 and then maybe a couple further but nothing past ’77. Knowledge and research seemed to have stopped by then.

    On its face, you’d think that we could easily compete with this antiquated, wrong-headed thinking. It includes theories and methods that have been roundly discredited, criticized and proven untrue.

    But we haven’t.

    Why not?
    My first thought is because we haven't created a business model and (sufficient) cultural artifacts that sustain such practice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon Newman
    replied
    Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
    Please note Paris' vehement insistance that he "seeks the CAUSE" of the pain and works to resolve that with postural instruction, mobilization and active, choreographed exercise.

    Am I missing anything?

    Haven't the problems inherent to this approach been discussed for years?

    What more can we say?

    Is anybody in Florida listening?
    Well it's part of his goal to maintain "the standard of manipulation as we know it." I presume this stands in contrast to teaching what comes to be revealed about it over time. Chiropractic has the same problem.

    I also noted that he doesn't have to update because, as he states, his school meets current CAPTE requirements.
    Last edited by Jon Newman; 21-12-2011, 08:20 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    You'd think, but this point seems to be lost on a lot of therapists.

    I worked with Stan for four years in the late 70s and he designated me the "senior clinician" of his clinic in Atlanta. Three years ago he kindly invited me to speak at his college and I tried my best to make some sort of impact.

    Nothin'

    What I find especially helpful here is the freshness of the recording. Stan speaks today as he did in Montreal in '74. Full of conviction, belief and stories he tells well. As charismatic as ever.

    I also think the fact that his name and accomplishments are not familiar to the vast majority of therapists I've met the past few years is a tragedy.
    Last edited by Barrett Dorko; 28-03-2012, 12:12 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackson
    replied
    Short lunch today, so I only made it to about the 9 minute mark. Here Dr. Paris talks about following the pathoanatomical medical diagnostic model, and treats based on this diagnosis. He then states there is no published research to reliably diagnose with this model, and that this is what research should be focusing on.

    Barrett, I'll admit that I wasn't around in 1974, but if we can't come with any reliable studies in 37 years, can we then say that this model is unofficially "unreliable?"

    Nick

    Leave a comment:


  • zimney3pt
    replied
    Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
    Please note Paris' vehement insistance that he "seeks the CAUSE" of the pain and works to resolve that with postural instruction, mobilization and active, choreographed exercise.

    Am I missing anything?

    Haven't the problems inherent to this approach been discussed for years?

    What more can we say?

    Is anybody in Florida listening?
    Speaking of time machines, how come an image of Sergeant Shultz comes to mind as he says...""I know nothing!", "I see nothing!" or "I hear nothing!"

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    replied
    Please note Paris' vehement insistance that he "seeks the CAUSE" of the pain and works to resolve that with postural instruction, mobilization and active, choreographed exercise.

    Am I missing anything?

    Haven't the problems inherent to this approach been discussed for years?

    What more can we say?

    Is anybody in Florida listening?

    Leave a comment:


  • Barrett Dorko
    started a topic The time machine

    The time machine

    I love the episode of Mad Men titled The Wheel. My favorite line:

    This isn’t a space ship, it’s a time machine.
    I feel like I entered one yesterday listening to this interview. I was transported to 1974 and then maybe a couple further but nothing past ’77. Knowledge and research seemed to have stopped by then.

    On its face, you’d think that we could easily compete with this antiquated, wrong-headed thinking. It includes theories and methods that have been roundly discredited, criticized and proven untrue.

    But we haven’t.

    Why not?
Working...
X