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  • We Are Tesla

    I’ve been searching for an idea for a new thread the past couple of weeks and found it while walking Buckeye this morning. This week on Studio 360 is the story of Nikola Tesla, the genius, inventor, obsessive and world class eccentric.

    I listened to it again as I raked the last of this year’s leaves and found that Tesla’s ideas, conflicts and isolation resonated with many of the more vocal members of the Soma Simple community. Or, at least, it seems so to me. One post after another came to mind and I decided to see if we couldn’t work through this together.

    If you get a chance, listen to the podcast or the program itself and consider the following:
    • “The War of the Currents” and its relation to mechanical and reflexive effect in manual care.
    • The “magical” aspects of advanced technology.
    • The conflict with Edison.
    • Why Tesla’s influence has endured but his notoriety has not.

    Well, that’s a start. Let’s see where this goes.
    Barrett L. Dorko

  • #2
    A great deal of what I say here will come from Kurt Anderson’s comments as well as the insights of Samantha Hunt, his guest for the show and author of a novel about Tesla and the monologue by Mike Daisy reviewed here.

    On the show I was taken especially by Daisy’s retelling of Tesla’s break with Edison over the issue of current. Simply put, Edison favored direct current. This was not only dangerous it was remarkably inefficient, needing a boost that required building a station – every two miles.

    Tesla developed alternating current; a way of transferring electricity distances beyond what they could imagine at the time.

    Many years ago I heard John Mennell M.D. say, “There are always two effects from manipulation – mechanical and reflexive."

    I think we can use the war of the currents here. More soon.
    Last edited by Barrett Dorko; 30-11-2008, 05:28 AM.
    Barrett L. Dorko

    Comment


    • #3
      Tesla was one of the greatest minds of both the 19th and 20th centuries. His contributions have revolutionized life as we know it for the entire world. Yet he was constantly dogged by critics and competitors, and did not officially receive proper credit until well after his death. There are compelling aspects to Tesla's story that may have some parallels here.

      However, Tesla was also famously bad with the details of his personal finances, business dealings in general, questionable and inconsistent documentation of his research and methods, given to whimsical and poetic outbursts, and frequently failed to make good on promises requiring completion of a project on time and within budget. So, when drawing upon Tesla for your inspiration, please be specific about the context of your comparisons.

      We wouldn't want to get the wrong impression...
      Novice Woo Shoo Kung Foo practitioner. Experienced critic of Truthiness.
      "It used to be, everyone was entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts. But that's not the case anymore. Facts matter not at all...Truthiness is 'What I say is right, and [nothing] anyone else says could possibly be true.' " - Stephen Colbert

      Comment


      • #4
        Jason,

        You’re not wrong about what Tesla struggled with personally, but I am under the impression that he wasn’t consciously in charge of his own behavior to the extent most of us are. There were certain things he simply could not make himself care about, or even pretend to care about. There’s no fixing that as far as I know. I have similar inclinations and whether these behaviors are seen as failings depends upon the culture’s judgment – a changeable thing.

        Daisy speaks of Edison as “a methodist” and states that he is not speaking of the Christian denomination but rather of his strong tendency to strike out toward a goal with a set method for achieving it in place. He never strayed from the method and was thus blinded to its limitations. He said famously that "genius is 10% inspiration and 90% perspiration" and there’s something to be said for that. He was, after all, an Ohio boy. But I think he was speaking of only one kind of genius.

        Tesla had visions, and it's not evident that he perspired much. Fully formed ideas and machines just showed up in his brain somewhere where he could see them and then commit them to paper.

        Who among the leaders in therapy are the methodists?
        Last edited by Barrett Dorko; 07-06-2015, 03:51 PM.
        Barrett L. Dorko

        Comment


        • #5
          One thing I picked up from listening to the podcast was that Edison leaned heavily into the direction he committed himself to, which also happened to be the one profiting him personally and financially (which made him even more blind and "methodist," perhaps, than he might have been) whereas Tesla cared not for wealth, it would seem, only about writing down his visions.
          Diane
          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
          @PainPhysiosCan
          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
          @WCPTPTPN
          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

          @dfjpt
          SomaSimple on Facebook
          @somasimple

          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

          Comment


          • #6
            Diane,

            So true. Years ago I read of The Duchess' Game within the context of play and business. I believe its one rule has its origins in Alice in Wonderland.

            The rule:

            The more there is for me, the less there is for you


            No takers on my question about methodists? I'll give the first answer that comes to mind - Robin McKenzie.
            Barrett L. Dorko

            Comment


            • #7
              Barnes would be another.
              Diane
              www.dermoneuromodulation.com
              SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
              HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
              Neurotonics PT Teamblog
              Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
              Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
              @PainPhysiosCan
              WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
              @WCPTPTPN
              Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

              @dfjpt
              SomaSimple on Facebook
              @somasimple

              "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

              “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

              “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

              "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

              "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

              Comment


              • #8
                Barrett, Diane and you mentioned the two biggest we have at the moment. Mulligan, Sahrmann and others could be added.
                Basically ANYONE who espouses "method application" over "process understanding".
                We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are - Anais Nin

                I suppose it's easier to believe something than it is to understand it.
                Cmdr. Chris Hadfield on rise of poor / pseudo science

                Pain is a conscious correlate of the implicit perception of threat to body tissue - Lorimer Moseley

                We don't need a body to feel a body. Ronald Melzack

                Comment


                • #9
                  It seems to me that Kendall was the original and most influential methodist - basing her method on a false premise and then never straying from that despite all evidence to the contrary.

                  I heard in a podcast recently that the death of a "classical" education in our university system had to do with our reasoning becoming deductive i.e. we created a model of the world and then placed our observations within the model. This blinds us to observations the model cannot explain. Inductive reasoning wouldn't do this.

                  More about that soon.
                  Barrett L. Dorko

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Methodists list:
                    McKenzie, JB Barnes, Sahrmann, Kendall, Mulligan (though I think he suspected neurophysiology was involved), Cyriax, Maitland...it goes on and on for decades.

                    It makes it even more remarkable that inductivists like Butler, Shacklock, Dorko fought against this mesodermal mountain of methodology and have made some impact.

                    Nari

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Definitely Mulligan, Nari. He might have suspected, but he didn't "go there" did he? He plunked everything about his "method" firmly under the title of mesodermal construct.

                      Add Rolf to the list.

                      I think Nari, you meant JF Barnes, not JB.

                      The list of method-ologies (as opposed to method-ists): manip, core stabilizing ex., strengthening, MET, SCS, MFR, just about anything that has a piece of mesoderm in its title or in its construct, and, optionally, a name of someone who benefited financially attached. The chiros certainly took this option. I'm sure, going back to the Edison powerhouse every two miles metaphor, there would be a chiro amplification shed every two feet. No, make that every two centimeters.
                      Last edited by Diane; 01-12-2008, 06:44 PM.
                      Diane
                      www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                      SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                      HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                      Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                      Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                      @PainPhysiosCan
                      WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                      @WCPTPTPN
                      Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                      @dfjpt
                      SomaSimple on Facebook
                      @somasimple

                      "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                      “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                      “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                      "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                      "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wrote The Ignorance of Jed a long time ago and still base a lecture on it when I’m speaking. Methodists and methodologies seem quite consistently to be in the throes of mesodermal thinking. Others (us, for the most part) are ectodermally driven in our thinking, and we are driven there by the patient’s response to care, not on a preconceived and out-dated model of the human body. Our reasoning is inductive – not deductive.

                        The concept of reflexive effect seems to be what we’re edging toward here. I see it as akin to alternating current.
                        Barrett L. Dorko

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The term "interactive stance" would also be more along the lines of the metaphor of Tesla/alternating current, and the term "operator stance" more along the lines of Edison/DC/methodist/methodology/mesodigm models.
                          Last edited by Diane; 30-11-2008, 11:05 PM.
                          Diane
                          www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                          SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                          HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                          Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                          Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                          @PainPhysiosCan
                          WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                          @WCPTPTPN
                          Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                          @dfjpt
                          SomaSimple on Facebook
                          @somasimple

                          "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                          “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                          “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                          "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                          "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes, I think I meant to type JF. Slip of the mind/finger/s.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Another aspect of Tesla's peculiarity: he commonly allowed the electricity he loved to flow through him, producing a form of lightning to emerge from his hands. I don't think Edison did this.

                              Is there a connection here to the imposed limitations of a methodist?

                              On the show Hunt says, "He (Tesla) fancied himself a magician, but then insisted that what he did was not magic."

                              Sound familiar?
                              Barrett L. Dorko

                              Comment

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