Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Against the zombification of PT

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by canuckpt View Post
    It's funny you posted this since I was thinking today about habits we develop and don't realize. This may seem odd but the paper towel has run out in the employee washroom at work and we have to buy a new supply. In the mean time I have placed a towel for myself to use. However, everyime I wash my hands I press the paper towel dispenser even though I know it's empty. I do this out of habit. I must have done this 10 times today. It made me realize how unconcious these habits are.

    It made me think about patients that are in chronic pain and how this has become a habit for lack of a better word. If I find it hard to break my paper towel habit then think of how hard it must be for tha patient to break the cycle of pain.
    In my work as a trainer, I do a lot of retraining of poor movement patterns. The first step is to bring conscious awareness to what it happening, so they can feel it. Then it becomes possible for them to understand how to correct it so progress can be made.
    Novice Woo Shoo Kung Foo practitioner. Experienced critic of Truthiness.
    "It used to be, everyone was entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts. But that's not the case anymore. Facts matter not at all...Truthiness is 'What I say is right, and [nothing] anyone else says could possibly be true.' " - Stephen Colbert

    Comment


    • #47
      The zombification of philosophy on Rationally speaking blog.
      Cory Blickenstaff, PT, OCS

      Pain Science and Sensibility Podcast
      Leaps and Bounds Blog
      My youtube channel

      Comment


      • #48
        Canuck,
        Perhaps you keep reaching for the paper towels that are not there because your brain knows that eventually they will be there again so it does not want to give up a "habit" that produces a desired result. It may be that the brain of many chronic pain patients also keeps up the short term relief habits for that desired effect, and it is only when a longer term relief habit is identified that the brain will change the habit. The complexities of the human brain seem to have no limits.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Diane View Post

          After a particularly brisk exchange over on MyPTSpace this past weekend (on a thread that is rapidly approaching 600 posts), some of these themes I've been thinking about lately congealed into another (heretical) thought: PTs act like zombies much of the time. They prefer to enact robotic protocols, robotically derived and robotically dished, robotically driven. They do NOT want to access their own life or creativity or access their own awareness, seem to prefer to act like zombies instead, cut off from their patients.
          Led here from the chiro-quack thread and this zombie reference applies to all professionals not just PTs involved in musculoskeletal pain (MP) management. Everyone wants protocols. There is a fear of the art of customizing care for each individual patient. Each MP patient has a unique history, sensitization, attitude & belief about pain, pain expectancy, habitual guarded behavior, etc..

          This zombie behavior makes PTs & others 'prisoners of protocols'. This certainly makes practice easier & more profitable but it does not allow care to be oriented towards the patients own activity (participation) goals, nor does it allow rehabilitation of the sensory-motor system.

          Zombie health care professionals sadly have crawled under the rock of their own dogma avoid the light of patient-centered care that is oriented towards the WHO goal of social participation & Independent Function.

          Comment


          • #50
            This is a fresh post on an old old thread.
            The zombie is devoid of consciousness and therefore unable to critique the system that has entrapped him. He’s labor without grievance. He works free and never goes on strike. You don’t have to feed him much.
            From this, A Zombie Is a Slave Forever
            Diane
            www.dermoneuromodulation.com
            SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
            HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
            Neurotonics PT Teamblog
            Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
            Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
            @PainPhysiosCan
            WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
            @WCPTPTPN
            Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

            @dfjpt
            SomaSimple on Facebook
            @somasimple

            "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

            “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

            “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

            "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

            "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

            Comment


            • #51
              Thanks for this Diane.

              Do you think it's a mere coincidence that zombies are often referred to as "the undead"?
              Barrett L. Dorko

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Barrett Dorko View Post
                Thanks for this Diane.

                Do you think it's a mere coincidence that zombies are often referred to as "the undead"?
                No.
                Diane
                www.dermoneuromodulation.com
                SensibleSolutionsPhysiotherapy
                HumanAntiGravitySuit blog
                Neurotonics PT Teamblog
                Canadian Physiotherapy Pain Science Division (Archived newsletters, paincasts)
                Canadian Physiotherapy Association Pain Science Division Facebook page
                @PainPhysiosCan
                WCPT PhysiotherapyPainNetwork on Facebook
                @WCPTPTPN
                Neuroscience and Pain Science for Manual PTs Facebook page

                @dfjpt
                SomaSimple on Facebook
                @somasimple

                "Rene Descartes was very very smart, but as it turned out, he was wrong." ~Lorimer Moseley

                “Comment is free, but the facts are sacred.” ~Charles Prestwich Scott, nephew of founder and editor (1872-1929) of The Guardian , in a 1921 Centenary editorial

                “If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you, but if you really make them think, they'll hate you." ~Don Marquis

                "In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists" ~Roland Barth

                "Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one."~Voltaire

                Comment


                • #53
                  It is a silly sidenote but I sort of doubt Nari on this. I too use my left hand on the lid to open jars, I suspect most right-handers do, this isn't because my left hand is stronger but because the real torquing is being done by the right hand. I suspect it mostly has to do with the righty-tighty, lefty-loosy nature of most things.

                  So Nari, now I have openly doubted you, what does your hand grip dynamometer say? You must have one lying around.

                  Edit: Sorry, I meant to quote Nari saying her left hand is stronger than her right.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    No, Randy, I have never possessed a hand dynamometer and rarely used one anyway.
                    You may be right about the torque effect of the right hand. That makes sense.

                    Nari

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Great thread, thanks for all the interesting links.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X